Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Going Against the Interactional Tide: The Accomplishment of Dialogic Moments From a Conversation Analytic Perspective.Geoffrey Raymond, Hedwig te Molder & Lotte van Burgsteden - 2022 - Discourse Studies 24 (4):471-490.
    This article addresses a vital concern in current society by showing what participants themselves may treat as ways to transcend their differences. Actors’ shared understanding has been of longstanding interest across the social sciences. Conversation analysis treats the procedural infrastructure of interaction as the basis for participants to manage intersubjectivity. The field of dialogue studies has made occasions in which people transform their relationship by discussing their differences, central to their research project, and called them “dialogic moments.” This study draws (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Improvisations in the Embodied Interactions of a Non-Speaking Autistic Child and His Mother: Practices for Creating Intersubjective Understanding.Rachel S. Y. Chen - 2022 - Cognitive Linguistics 33 (1):155-191.
    The human capacity for intersubjective engagement is present, even when one is limited in speaking, pointing, and coordinating gaze. This paper examines the everyday social interactions of two differently-disposed actors—a non-speaking autistic child and his speaking, neurotypical mother—who participate in shared attention through dialogic turn-taking. In the collaborative pursuit of activities, the participants coordinate across multiple turns, producing multi-turn constructions that accomplish specific goals. The paper asks two questions about these collaborative constructions: 1) What are their linguistic and discursive structures? (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Occasioned Semantics: A Systematic Approach to Meaning in Talk. [REVIEW]Jack Bilmes - 2011 - Human Studies 34 (2):129-153.
    This paper puts forward an argument for a systematic, technical approach to formulation in verbal interaction. I see this as a kind of expansion of Sacks’ membership categorization analysis, and as something that is not offered (at least not in a fully developed form) by sequential analysis, the currently dominant form of conversation analysis. In particular, I suggest a technique for the study of “occasioned semantics,” that is, the study of structures of meaningful expressions in actual occasions of conversation. I (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • Generalization: A Practice of Situated Categorization in Talk. [REVIEW]Eric Hauser - 2011 - Human Studies 34 (2):183-198.
    This paper analyzes four instances in talk of generalization about people, that is, of using statements about one or more people as the basis of stating something about a category. Generalization can be seen as a categorization practice which involves a reflexive relationship between the generalized-from person or people and the generalized-to category. One thing that is accomplished through generalization is instruction in how to understand the identity of the generalized-from person or people, so in addition to being understood as (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Action Formation and its Epistemic (and Other) Backgrounds.John Heritage - 2013 - Discourse Studies 15 (5):551-578.
    This article reviews arguments that, in the process of action formation and ascription, the relative status of the participants with respect to a projected action can adjust or trump the action stance conveyed by the linguistic form of the utterance. In general, congruency between status and stance is preferred, and linguistic form is a fairly reliable guide to action ascription. However incongruities between stance and status result in action ascriptions that are at variance with the action stance that is otherwise (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   22 citations  
  • ‘Why Do These People’s Opinions Matter?’ Positioning Known Referents as Unnameable Others.Clare Jackson - 2013 - Discourse Studies 15 (3):299-317.
    The way we refer to third parties in talk is one means through which relationships between speaker, recipients and referents are made relevant. A range of referring expressions is available and any number of expressions might correctly refer to a referent. One guide to selection is the preference for achieving recognition and the default practice is, where possible, to use a name. This conversation analytic article describes a practice that does not fit the default pattern. In this practice, speakers select (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • (De)Constructing the Sociological Imagination? Media Discourse, Intellectuals and the Challenge of Public Engagement.Frederick T. Attenborough - 2016 - Discourse and Communication 10 (5):437-457.
    This article explores the interrelationships and tensions between public engagement in higher education and media discourse. It tracks the mediated trajectory of an attempt by a group of academics to connect with audiences beyond academia, comparing a magazine article in which their opinions first became public, to its recontextualisation across various UK newspapers and their Internet spin-offs. A mediated stylistic analysis reveals the discursive, rhetorical and performative techniques via which a sociologically imaginative attempt to transform a seemingly-personal-trouble into a definitively-public-issue (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Ubiquity of Epistemics: A Rebuttal to the ‘Epistemics of Epistemics’ Group.John Heritage - 2018 - Discourse Studies 20 (1):14-56.
    In 2016, Discourse Studies published a special issue on the ‘epistemics of epistemics’ comprising six papers, all of which took issue with a strand of my research on how knowledge claims are asserted, implemented and contested through facets of turn design and sequence organization. Apparently coordinated through some years of discussion, the critique is nonetheless somewhat confused and confusing. In this article, I take up some of more prominent elements of the critique: my work is ‘cognitivist’ substituting causal psychological analysis (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Brains, Genes, and Language Evolution: A New Synthesis.Morten H. Christiansen & Nick Chater - 2008 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (5):537-558.
    Our target article argued that a genetically specified Universal Grammar (UG), capturing arbitrary properties of languages, is not tenable on evolutionary grounds, and that the close fit between language and language learners arises because language is shaped by the brain, rather than the reverse. Few commentaries defend a genetically specified UG. Some commentators argue that we underestimate the importance of processes of cultural transmission; some propose additional cognitive and brain mechanisms that may constrain language and perhaps differentiate humans from nonhuman (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Exploring the Cognitive Infrastructure of Communication.Jan Peter de Ruiter, Matthijs L. Noordzij, Sarah Newman-Norlund, Roger Newman-Norlund, Peter Hagoort, Stephen C. Levinson & Ivan Toni - 2010 - Interaction Studies 11 (1):51-77.
    Human communication is often thought about in terms of transmitted messages in a conventional code like a language. But communication requires a specialized interactive intelligence. Senders have to be able to perform recipient design, while receivers need to be able to do intention recognition, knowing that recipient design has taken place. To study this interactive intelligence in the lab, we developed a new task that taps directly into the underlying abilities to communicate in the absence of a conventional code. We (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Self-Description in Everyday Interaction: Generalizations About Oneself as Accounts of Behavior.Laura Visapää - 2021 - Discourse Studies 23 (3):339-364.
    This article suggests that there are systematic ways in which the identity of the ‘self’, as created and performed through first-person markers, can be made relevant and consequential in particular episodes of interaction. More specifically, the study looks at generalizations that people present about themselves in local interactional contexts: displays of the types of people they are and the ways in which they always or never behave. It will be shown that such self-generalizations are typically used to account for one’s (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Acknowledging or Denying Membership: Reviewers’ Responses to Non-Anglophone Scientists’ Manuscripts.Guadalupe López-Bonilla & Karen Englander - 2011 - Discourse Studies 13 (4):395-416.
    Publishing scientific articles is a crucial activity performed by a scientist to demonstrate inclusion as part of the community of scientists: a community constituted by journal editors, reviewers, authors and readers. A manuscript submitted to journals is first read by reviewers, and their decision to accept it creates membership in the community for the author with its attendant privileges of ingroup status. Rejection bars such membership. In this article we examine the language used by this powerful individual — the journal (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Introduction: Person-Reference in Conversation Analytic Research.Celia Kitzinger & Gene H. Lerner - 2007 - Discourse Studies 9 (4):427-432.
    In this introduction to the special issue of Discourse Studies on `Referring to Self and Others in Conversation' we briefly survey the history of conversation analytic work on reference to persons from Sacks and Schegloff's pioneering seven-page paper to the most recently published work. We then introduce the contributions to the special issue.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Language as Shaped by Social Interaction.N. J. Enfield - 2008 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (5):519-520.
    Language is shaped by its environment, which includes not only the brain, but also the public context in which speech acts are effected. To fully account for why language has the shape it has, we need to examine the constraints imposed by language use as a sequentially organized joint activity, and as the very conduit for linguistic diffusion and change.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations