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  1. FY1 Doctors' Ethicolegal Challenges in Their First Year of Clinical Practice: An Interview Study.Pirashanthie Vivekananda-Schmidt & Bryan Vernon - 2014 - Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (4):277-281.
    Background There is little evidence of junior trainee perspectives in the design and implementation of medical ethics and law curriculum in UK medical schools.Aim To determine the ethical issues the foundation year 1 doctors encountered during clinical practice and the skills and knowledge of MEL, which were useful in informing MEL curriculum development.Method The National Research Ethics Service gave ethical approval. Eighteen one-to-one interviews were conducted in each school with FY1 doctors.Analysis Interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim; a thematic analysis (...)
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  • Ethical Decision-Making About Older Adults and Moral Intensity: An International Study of Physicians.D. C. Malloy, J. Williams, T. Hadjistavropoulos, B. Krishnan, M. Jeyaraj, E. F. McCarthy, M. Murakami, S. Paholpak, J. Mafukidze & B. Hillis - 2008 - Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (4):285-296.
    Through discourse with international groups of physicians, we conducted a cross-cultural analysis of the types of ethical dilemmas physicians face. Qualitative analysis was used to categorise the dilemmas into seven themes, which we compared among the physicians by country of practice. These themes were a-theoretically-driven and grounded heavily within the text. We then subjected the dilemmas to an analysis of moral intensity, which represents an important theoretical perspective of ethical decision making. These constructs represent salient determinants of ethical behaviour and (...)
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  • Ethics Briefings.M. Davies, S. Brannan, E. Chrispin, V. English, R. Mussell & J. C. Sheather - 2012 - Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (7):446-448.
  • Mandatory Disclosure and Medical Paternalism.Emma C. Bullock - 2016 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 19 (2):409-424.
    Medical practitioners are duty-bound to tell their patients the truth about their medical conditions, along with the risks and benefits of proposed treatments. Some patients, however, would rather not receive medical information. A recent response to this tension has been to argue that that the disclosure of medical information is not optional. As such, patients do not have permission to refuse medical information. In this paper I argue that, depending on the context, the disclosure of medical information can undermine the (...)
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  • Free Choice and Patient Best Interests.Emma C. Bullock - 2016 - Health Care Analysis 24 (4):374-392.
    In medical practice, the doctrine of informed consent is generally understood to have priority over the medical practitioner’s duty of care to her patient. A common consequentialist argument for the prioritisation of informed consent above the duty of care involves the claim that respect for a patient’s free choice is the best way of protecting that patient’s best interests; since the patient has a special expertise over her values and preferences regarding non-medical goods she is ideally placed to make a (...)
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  • A Framework for Luck Egalitarianism in Health and Healthcare.A. Albertsen & C. Knight - 2015 - Journal of Medical Ethics 41 (2):165-169.
    Several attempts have been made to apply the choice-sensitive theory of distributive justice, luck egalitarianism, in the context of health and healthcare. This article presents a framework for this discussion by highlighting different normative decisions to be made in such an application, some of the objections to which luck egalitarians must provide answers and some of the practical implications associated with applying such an approach in the real world. It is argued that luck egalitarians should address distributions of health rather (...)
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