Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. On Reasons We Want Teachers to Care.Jade Nguyen - 2016 - Ethics and Education 11 (3):286-298.
    Much of the literature supports the moral development theory as a justification for teachers to care, where teachers should care for their students because it contributes to their moral education as caring persons. If no causal relationship can be established, the question remains whether we would want teachers to care, preferably one that does not merely import its external normative significance into teaching. I argue that an understanding of teaching, and moreover, of good teaching already has embedded within it conceptions (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • No Man’s Land: Exploring the Space Between Gilligan and Kohlberg. [REVIEW]Gabriel D. Donleavy - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 80 (4):807 - 822.
    The Kohlberg Gilligan Controversy has received intermittent but inconclusive attention for many years, perhaps reflecting the difficulty of bridging the two positions. This article explores the published evidence for Gilligan’s claims of gender difference, gender identity difference, and role of caring in people’s ethics. It seems that the evidence for pronounced gender differences in ethical attitudes within business is weak, even if gender identity is used instead of physical gender. The main propositions of Care Theory and recent advances in its (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  • Abstraction and Justification in Moral Theory.Cynthia A. Stark - 2010 - Hypatia 25 (4):825-833.
    Ethicists of care have objected to traditional moral philosophy's reliance upon abstract universal principles. They claim that the use of abstraction renders traditional theories incapable of capturing morally relevant, particular features of situations. I argue that this objection sometimes conflates two different levels of moral thinking: the level of justification and the level of deliberation. Specifically, I claim that abstraction or attention to context at the level of justification does not entail, as some critics seem to think, a commitment to (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Implementation and Evaluation of a Nursing Ethics Course at Turkish Doctoral Nursing Programs.Leyla Dinç - 2015 - Journal of Academic Ethics 13 (4):375-387.
    Graduate nursing students should have a strong ethical theoretical foundation to identify and explore scientific and technological ethical issues impacting nursing care, to assume leadership positions in practice and education, and to conduct research contributing to nursing’s knowledge base. This paper reports the implementation and evaluation of a new ethics course at Turkish doctoral nursing programs. The first section describes course design and implementation. The second section evaluates the course and discusses results. Students’ evaluations indicated that the concept of caring (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Care Ethics and Animal Welfare.Daniel Engster - 2006 - Journal of Social Philosophy 37 (4):521–536.
  • The Commodification of Care.Rutger Claassen - 2011 - Hypatia 26 (1):43-64.
    This paper discusses the question whether care work for dependent persons (children, the elderly, and disabled persons) may be entrusted to the market; that is, whether and to what extent there is a normative justification for the “commodification of care.” It first proposes a capability theory for care that raises two relevant demands: a basic capability for receiving care and a capability for giving care. Next it discusses and rejects two objections that aim to show that market-based care undermines the (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Why Patients Have a Moral Obligation to Give Care to Clinicians.Stephen Buetow - 2014 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 20 (6):890-895.
  • Affirmation and Care: A Feminist Account of Bullying and Bullying Prevention.Tim R. Johnston - 2015 - Hypatia 30 (2):403-417.
    Despite the amount of attention that activists, educators, psychologists, and the media place on bullying and bullying prevention, there has been no sustained philosophical reflection on bullying, nor has there been a feminist analysis of the growing literature on bullying. This essay seeks to satisfy those two needs. The first section is a broad introduction to the literature on bullying. I define bullying and distinguish it from teasing, sassing, roughhousing, and other more benign interactions. I also outline two common solutions (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Reassembling Political Assemblies: Care Ethics and Political Agency.Maureen Sander-Staudt - 2008 - Journal of Social Philosophy 39 (2):269–290.
  • Care and Commitment in Ethical Consumption: An Exploration of the ‘Attitude–Behaviour Gap’.Deirdre Shaw, Robert McMaster & Terry Newholm - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 136 (2):251-265.
    In this paper we argue that greater attention must be given to peoples’ expression of “care” in relation to consumption. We suggest that “caring about” does not necessarily lead to “care-giving,” as conceptualising an attitude–behaviour gap might imply, but that a closer examination of the intensity, morality, and articulation of care can lead to a greater understanding of consumer narratives and, thus, behaviour. To examine this proposition, a purposive sample of self-identified ethical consumers was interviewed. Care is expressed by the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • Aquinas and the Obligations of Mercy.Shawn Floyd - 2009 - Journal of Religious Ethics 37 (3):449-471.
    Contemporary philosophers often construe mercy as a supererogatory notion or a matter of punitive leniency. Yet it is false that no merciful actions are obligatory. Further, it is questionable whether mercy is really about punitive leniency, either exclusively or primarily. As an alternative to these accounts, I consider the view offered by St. Thomas Aquinas. He rejects the claim that we are never obligated to be merciful. Also, his view of mercy is not restricted to legal contexts. For him, mercy's (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Caring About the Clinician Who Seems Uncaring: The ‘as If’ Approach.Stephen Buetow - 2014 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 20 (6):957-960.