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  1. How Literature Expands Your Imagination.Antonia Peacocke - forthcoming - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research.
    Philosophy and Phenomenological Research, EarlyView.
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  • Nostalgia.S. A. Howard - 2012 - Analysis 72 (4):641-650.
    Next SectionThis article argues against two dominant accounts of the nature of nostalgia. These views assume that nostalgia depends, in some way, on comparing a present situation with a past one. However, neither does justice to the full range of recognizably nostalgic experiences available to us – in particular, ‘Proustian’ nostalgia directed at involuntary autobiographical memories. Therefore, the accounts in question fail. I conclude by considering an evaluative puzzle raised by Proustian nostalgia when it is directed at memories that the (...)
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  • Art as a Metaphor of the Mind: A Neo-Jamesian Aesthetics Embracing Phenomenology, Neuroscience, and Evolution.Andrea Lavazza - 2008 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 8 (2):159-182.
    This paper focuses on the emergent neo-Jamesian perspective concerning the phenomenology of art and aesthetic experience. Starting from the distinction between nucleus and fringe in the stream of thought described by William James, it can be argued that our appreciation of a work of art is guided by a vague and blurred perception of a much more powerful content, of which we are not fully aware. Accordingly, a work of art is seen as a kind of metaphor of our mental (...)
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  • Neurocognitive Poetics: Methods and Models for Investigating the Neuronal and Cognitive-Affective Bases of Literature Reception.Arthur M. Jacobs - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  • Flash Aesthesis: A Neurophilosophy of Aesthetic Experience.Ronaldo Bispo - 2004 - Trans/Form/Ação 27 (2):113-142.
    Following text places in dialogue or applies to a certain conception of aesthetic experience a vast set of experimental evidences extracted from the inquiry of other mental phenomena, in particular the subjective experience of emotions and feelings. Comimg from António Damásio the beam master, the skeleton, the base, the structure of all my argument. My main hypothesis is that certain objects and situations activate cerebral dispositional hyper-spaces associated to the ocurrence of phenomena like sensation of beauty, pleasure and joy. I (...)
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  • Aesthetic Experience: Marcel Proust and the Neo-Jamesian Structure of Awareness.David Galin - 2004 - Consciousness and Cognition 13 (2):241-253.
  • Emotion and Narrative Fiction: Interactive Influences Before, During, and After Reading.Raymond A. Mar, Keith Oatley, Maja Djikic & Justin Mullin - 2011 - Cognition and Emotion 25 (5):818-833.
  • An Externalist Approach to Creativity: Discovery Versus Recombination.Andrea Lavazza & Riccardo Manzotti - 2013 - Mind and Society 12 (1):61-72.
    What is the goal of creativity? Is it just a symbolic reshuffling or a moment of semantic extension? Similar to the contrast between syntax and semantics, creativity has an internal and an external aspect. Contrary to the widespread view that emphasises the problem-solving role of creativity, here we consider whether creativity represents an authentic moment of ontological discovery and semantic openness like Schopenhauer and Picasso suggested. To address the semantic aspect of creativity, we take advantage of recent externalist models of (...)
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