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  1. Do You Have a “Syndrome” If You Have a Flat-Shaped Head?Adam Omelianchuk - 2018 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 43 (4):369-380.
    The themes of this issue—which include the meaning of our health and disease concepts, the so-called “medical gaze” and its embedded power relations, and the epistemic value of mixing therapy with research—are introduced by reflecting on a case about an infant girl whose head is observed to be somewhat flat.
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  • Health, Homeostasis, and the Situation-Specificity of Normality.Antoine C. Dussault & Anne-Marie Gagné-Julien - 2015 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 36 (1):61-81.
    Christopher Boorse’s Biostatistical Theory of Health has been the main contender among naturalistic accounts of health for the last 40 years. Yet, a recent criticism of this theory, presented by Elselijn Kingma, identifies a dilemma resulting from the BST’s conceptual linking of health and statistical typicality. Kingma argues that the BST either cannot accommodate the situation- specificity of many normal functions or cannot account for many situation-specific diseases. In this article, we expand upon with Daniel Hausman’s response to Kingma’s dilemma. (...)
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  • Boorse’s Theory of Disease: Do Values Matter?Brent M. Kious - 2018 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 43 (4):421-438.
    There has been much debate about whether the concept of disease articulated in Boorse’s biostatistical theory is value-neutral or value-laden. Here, I want to examine whether this debate matters. I suggest that there are two basic respects in which value-ladenness might be important: it could threaten either scientific legitimacy or moral permissibility. I argue that value-ladenness does not threaten the scientific legitimacy of our disease-concept because the concept makes little difference to the formulation and testing of scientific hypotheses. Likewise, even (...)
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  • Health as a Secondary Property.Alex Broadbent - forthcoming - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science.
    In the literature on health, naturalism and normativism are typically characterized as espousing and rejecting, respectively, the view that health is objective and value-free. This article points out that there are two distinct dimensions of disagreement, regarding objectivity and value-ladenness, and thus arranges naturalism and normativism as diagonal opposites on a two-by-two matrix of possible positions. One of the remaining quadrants is occupied by value-dependent realism, holding that health facts are value-laden and objective. The remaining quadrant, which holds that they (...)
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  • Medical Knowledge in a Social World: Introduction to the Special Issue.Bennett Holman, Sven Bernecker & Luciana Garbayo - forthcoming - Synthese.
    Philosophy of medicine has traditionally examined two issues: the scientific ontology for medicine and the epistemic significance of the types of evidence used in medical research. In answering each question, philosophers have typically brought to bear tools from traditional analytic philosophy. In contrast, this volume explores medical knowledge from the perspective offered by social epistemology.While many of the same issues are addressed, the approach to these issues generates both fresh questions and new insights into old debates. In addition, the broader (...)
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  • The Overdiagnosis of What? On the Relationship Between the Concepts of Overdiagnosis, Disease, and Diagnosis.Bjørn Hofmann - 2017 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 20 (4):453-464.
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  • Health, Justice and Happiness During Childhood.María del Mar Cabezas Hernández, Gunter Graf & Gottfried Schweiger - 2014 - South African Journal of Philosophy 33 (4):501-511.
  • The Case for a Meta-Nosological Investigation of Pragmatic Disease Definition and Classification.Jonathan Livingstone-Banks - 2018 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 24 (5):1013-1018.
    Nosology is the science of defining and classifying diseases. Meta‐nosology is the study of how we do this, on what principles nosological practices are based, the quality of the resulting medical taxonomy, and primarily whether/how diseases can be defined better than they are now. In modern Western medicine, there are a wide variety of ways in which diseases are defined and categorized. Examples include by the symptoms they present with (syndromic), their underlying causes (etiological), the biological mechanisms involved (pathogenetic), available (...)
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  • Disorders of Inattention and Hyperactivity: The Production of Responsible Subjects.G. Bowden - 2014 - History of the Human Sciences 27 (1):88-107.
    This article explores some of the normative commitments which persist in the literature on behavioural interventions for disorders of inattention and hyperactivity. These programmatic texts grapple with a contradiction: on one hand, they posit individuals who cannot be held responsible for their behaviour on the grounds that it is pathological, rather than wilful; on the other hand, these texts are written for individuals diagnosed with these disorders and for related authorities, obliged to mitigate said behaviour on the grounds that it (...)
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  • Two Kinds of Autism: A Comparison of Distinct Understandings of Psychiatric Disease.Berend Verhoeff - 2016 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 19 (1):111-123.
  • An Analysis of Potential Ethical Justifications for Mammoth De-Extinction And a Call for Empirical Research.Yasha Rohwer & Emma Marris - 2018 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 21 (1):127-142.
    We argue that the de-extinction of the mammoth cannot be ethically grounded by duties to the extinct mammoth, to ecosystem health or to individual organisms in ecosystems missing the mammoth. However, the action can be shown to be morally permissible via the goods it will afford humans, including advances in scientific knowledge, valuable experiences of awe and pleasure, and perhaps improvements to our moral character or behaviour—if and only if suffering is minimal. Finally, we call for empirical research into how (...)
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  • Resisting Moralisation in Health Promotion.Rebecca Brown - 2018 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 21 (4):997-1011.
    Health promotion efforts are commonly directed towards encouraging people to discard ‘unhealthy’ and adopt ‘healthy’ behaviours in order to tackle chronic disease. Typical targets for behaviour change interventions include diet, physical activity, smoking and alcohol consumption, sometimes described as ‘lifestyle behaviours.’ In this paper, I discuss how efforts to raise awareness of the impact of lifestyles on health, in seeking to communicate the need for people to change their behaviour, can contribute to a climate of ‘healthism’ and promote the moralisation (...)
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  • On Illness, Disease, and Priority: A Framework for More Fruitful Debates.Anke Bueter - forthcoming - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy.
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  • Human Enhancement: Enhancing Health or Harnessing Happiness?Bjørn Hofmann - forthcoming - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-12.
    Human enhancement is ontologically, epistemologically, and ethically challenging and has stirred a wide range of scholarly and public debates. This article focuses on some conceptual issues with HE that have important ethical implications. In particular it scrutinizes how the concept of human enhancement relates to and challenges the concept of health. In order to do so, it addresses three specific questions: Q1. What do conceptions of HE say about health? Q2. Does HE challenge traditional conceptions of health? Q3. Do concepts (...)
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  • On a Naturalist Theory of Health: A Critique.J. David Guerrero - 2010 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 41 (3):272-278.
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  • Testing Conscientious Objection by the Norm of Medicine.Toni C. Saad & Gregory Jackson - 2018 - Clinical Ethics 13 (1):9-16.
    Debate persists over the place of conscience in medicine. Some argue for the complete exclusion of conscientious objection, while others claim an absolute right of refusal. This paper proposes that claims of conscientious objection can and should be permitted if they concern kinds of actions which fall outside of the normative standard of medicine, which is the pursuit of health. Medical practice which meets this criterion we call medicine qua medicine. If conscientious refusal concerns something consonant with the health-restoring aims (...)
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  • Rethinking Health: Healthy or Healthier Than?S. Andrew Schroeder - 2013 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 64 (1):131-159.
    Theorists of health have, to this point, focused exclusively on trying to define a state—health—that an organism might be in. I argue that they have overlooked the possibility of a comparativist theory of health, which would begin by defining a relation—healthier than—that holds between two organisms or two possible states of the same organism. I show that a comparativist approach to health has a number of attractive features, and has important implications for philosophers of medicine, bioethicists, health economists, and policy (...)
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  • ¿Normal o patológico? El enfermo imaginario en tierra de nadie.Alberto Molina Pérez - 2013 - Arbor 189 (763):a068.
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