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  1. Awe or Horror: Differentiating Two Emotional Responses to Schema Incongruence.Pamela Marie Taylor & Yukiko Uchida - forthcoming - Cognition and Emotion:1-14.
    ABSTRACTExperiences that contradict one's core concepts elicit intense emotions. Such schema incongruence can elicit awe, wherein experiences that are too vast...
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  • Why Are People High in Dispositional Awe Happier? The Roles of Meaning in Life and Materialism.Huanhuan Zhao, Heyun Zhang, Yan Xu, Wen He & Jiamei Lu - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
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  • Collective Narcissism and In-Group Satisfaction Are Associated With Different Emotional Profiles and Psychological Wellbeing.Agnieszka Golec de Zavala - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
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  • Relation Between Awe and Environmentalism: The Role of Social Dominance Orientation.Huanhuan Zhao, Heyun Zhang, Yan Xu, Jiamei Lu & Wen He - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  • The Affective Core of Emotion: Linking Pleasure, Subjective Well-Being, and Optimal Metastability in the Brain.Morten L. Kringelbach & Kent C. Berridge - 2017 - Emotion Review 9 (3):191-199.
    Arguably, emotion is always valenced—either pleasant or unpleasant—and dependent on the pleasure system. This system serves adaptive evolutionary functions; relying on separable wanting, liking, and learning neural mechanisms mediated by mesocorticolimbic networks driving pleasure cycles with appetitive, consummatory, and satiation phases. Liking is generated in a small set of discrete hedonic hotspots and coldspots, while wanting is linked to dopamine and to larger distributed brain networks. Breakdown of the pleasure system can lead to anhedonia and other features of affective disorders. (...)
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  • Moving Through the Literature: What Is the Emotion Often Denoted Being Moved?Janis H. Zickfeld, Thomas W. Schubert, Beate Seibt & Alan P. Fiske - 2019 - Emotion Review 11 (2):123-139.
    When do people say that they are moved, and does this experience constitute a unique emotion? We review theory and empirical research on being moved across psychology and philosophy. We examine feeling labels, elicitors, valence, bodily sensations, and motivations. We find that the English lexeme being moved typically refers to a distinct and potent emotion that results in social bonding; often includes tears, piloerection, chills, or a warm feeling in the chest; and is often described as pleasurable, though sometimes as (...)
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  • The Nonverbal Communication of Positive Emotions: An Emotion Family Approach.Disa A. Sauter - 2017 - Emotion Review 9 (3):222-234.
    This review provides an overview of the research on nonverbal expressions of positive emotions, organised into emotion families, that is, clusters sharing common characteristics. Epistemological positive emotions are found to have distinct, recognisable displays via vocal or facial cues, while the agency-approach positive emotions appear to be associated with recognisable visual, but not auditory, cues. Evidence is less strong for the prosocial emotions in any modality other than touch, and there is little support for distinct recognisable signals of the savouring (...)
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  • Comment: Frameworks for Theory and Research on Positive Emotions.Ira J. Roseman - 2017 - Emotion Review 9 (3):238-244.
    Contributions to this special section on positive emotions are summarized and integrated within a framework for organizing theory and research on particular emotions. Emotions are conceptualized as evolved strategies for coping with crises and opportunities, elicited by situational and appraisal antecedents–with phenomenological, physiological, expressive, behavioral, and emotivational goal components. Within this framework, theories are compared, inconsistencies and gaps in knowledge are identified, and issues in emotion theory are discussed.
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  • Understudied Negative Emotions: What They Can Tell Us About the Nature of Emotions.Christine R. Harris - 2018 - Emotion Review 10 (4):269-271.
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  • Are You Awed Yet? How Virtual Reality Gives Us Awe and Goose Bumps.Denise Quesnel & Bernhard E. Riecke - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  • Comment: The Science of Positive Emotion: You’Ve Come a Long Way, Baby/There’s Still a Long Way to Go.Michelle N. Shiota - 2017 - Emotion Review 9 (3):235-237.
    After decades of neglect, positive emotion is now the focus of a rich, diverse, and rapidly growing field. Basic research has advanced understanding of positive emotions’ neural mechanisms, nonverbal expression, and implications for cognition and motivation, with increasing appreciation of positive emotion differentiation, as well as cultural and contextual moderators of positive emotions’ effects. Much research has also addressed ways positive emotions can be leveraged to improve the human condition, and the mechanisms by which interventions have beneficial effects. As always, (...)
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