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  1. Plato’s Creative Imagination: (Re)Membering the Chora(L) Love That We Are.Cheryl Lynch-Lawler - 2019 - Feminist Theology 28 (1):104-123.
    The Platonic chora, as the third, intermediating term, has been left in a state of virtual dereliction in the West. Its ternary logic transmutes oppositional logics of binarity, including the oppositions of interior and exterior, psyche and cosmos, human and divine. In this article I analyse the mytho-philosophical trajectory of the chora from Plato’s Timaeus, and Diotimaic love found in Plato’s Symposium. I argue that both the disruptive force of Diotimaic love, and the subversive chora with its ‘bastard reasoning’1 are (...)
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  • Diotima and Kuèsis in the Light of the Myths of the God’s Annexation of Pregnancy.Anne Gabrièle Wersinger - 2014 - Plato: The Internet Journal of the International Plato Society 14:23-38.
    Reported by a male, one of Diotima’s thesis seems rather surprising: men’ desire is to become pregnant. Scholars have pretended that kuèsis applied to males must be interpreted in a metaphorical sense, but this prohibits understanding why Diotima chooses this metaphor rather than another. In the light of the mythological traditions going back to Hesiod, Orpheus, and the New Musicians who emphasize the novelty of their music while considering themselves as begetting a newborn child, it seems reasonable to assume that (...)
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  • Irigaray and Lyotard: Birth, Infancy, and Metaphysics.Rachel Jones - 2012 - Hypatia 27 (1):139-162.
    This paper examines the ways in which Luce Irigaray and Jean-François Lyotard critique western metaphysics by drawing on notions of birth and infancy. It shows how both thinkers position birth as an event of beginning that can be reaffirmed in every act of initiation and recommencement. Irigaray's reading of Diotima's speech from Plato's Symposium is positioned as a key text for this project alongside a number of essays by Lyotard in which he explores the potency of infancy as the condition (...)
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