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  1. The Nature of Perceptual Constancies.Peter Schulte - 2021 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 103 (1):3-20.
    Perceptual constancies have been studied by psychologists for decades, but in recent years, they have also become a major topic in the philosophy of mind. One reason for this surge of interest is Tyler Burge’s (2010) influential claim that constancy mechanisms mark the difference between perception and mere sensitivity, and thereby also the difference between organisms with genuine representational capacities and ‘mindless’ beings. Burge’s claim has been the subject of intense debate. It is becoming increasingly clear, however, that we cannot (...)
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  • Psychosemantics and the Rich/Thin Debate1.E. J. Green - 2017 - Philosophical Perspectives 31 (1):153-186.
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  • Numerosities and Other Magnitudes in the Brains: A Comparative View.Elena Lorenzi, Matilde Perrino & Giorgio Vallortigara - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
    The ability to represent, discriminate, and perform arithmetic operations on discrete quantities has been documented in a variety of species of different taxonomic groups, both vertebrates and invertebrates. We do not know, however, to what extent similarity in behavioral data corresponds to basic similarity in underlying neural mechanisms. Here, we review evidence for magnitude representation, both discrete and continuous, following the sensory input path from primary sensory systems to associative pallial territories in the vertebrate brains. We also speculate on possible (...)
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  • Consciousness, Explanatory Inversion and Cognitive Science.John R. Searle - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):585-642.
    Cognitive science typically postulates unconscious mental phenomena, computational or otherwise, to explain cognitive capacities. The mental phenomena in question are supposed to be inaccessible in principle to consciousness. I try to show that this is a mistake, because all unconscious intentionality must be accessible in principle to consciousness; we have no notion of intrinsic intentionality except in terms of its accessibility to consciousness. I call this claim the The argument for it proceeds in six steps. The essential point is that (...)
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  • Emotion and the Interactive Brain: Insights From Comparative Neuroanatomy and Complex Systems.Luiz Pessoa - 2018 - Emotion Review 10 (3):204-216.
    Although emotion is closely associated with motivation, and interacts with perception, cognition, and action, many conceptualizations still treat emotion as separate from these domains. Here, a comparative/evolutionary anatomy framework is presented to motivate the idea that long-range, distributed circuits involving the midbrain, thalamus, and forebrain are central to emotional processing. It is proposed that emotion can be understood in terms of large-scale network interactions spanning the neuroaxis that form “functionally integrated systems.” At the broadest level, the argument is made that (...)
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  • The Objects of Action and Perception.Melvyn A. Goodale & G. Keith Humphrey - 1998 - Cognition 67 (1-2):181-207.
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  • The Objects of Action and Perception.M. A. Goodale & G. K. Humphrey - 1998 - Cognition 67 (1-2):181-207.
    Two major functions of the visual system are discussed and contrasted. One function of vision is the creation of an internal model or percept of the external world. Most research in object perception has concentrated on this aspect of vision. Vision also guides the control of object-directed action. In the latter case, vision directs our actions with respect to the world by transforming visual inputs into appropriate motor outputs. We argue that separate, but interactive, visual systems have evolved for the (...)
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  • Consciousness, Explanatory Inversion and Cognitive Science.John R. Searle - 1993 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (1):189-189.
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  • Logical Adaptationism.Ron Amundson - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (3):505.
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  • Animal Suffering, Critical Anthropomorphism, and Reproductive Rights.Gordon M. Burghardt - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):14-15.
  • Natural and Unnatural Justice in Animal Care.Stephen Walker - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):43-43.
  • Content and Action: The Guidance Theory of Representation.Gregg H. Rosenberg & Michael L. Anderson - 2008 - Journal of Mind and Behavior 29 (1-2):55-86.
    The current essay introduces the guidance theory of representation, according to which the content and intentionality of representations can be accounted for in terms of the way they provide guidance for action. The guidance theory offers a way of fixing representational content that gives the causal and evolutionary history of the subject only an indirect role, and an account of representational error, based on failure of action, that does not rely on any such notions as proper functions, ideal conditions, or (...)
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  • A Dilemma for Searle's Argument for the Connection Principle.Kirk Ludwig - 1993 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (1):194-5.
    Objections to Searle's argument for the Connection Principle and its consequences (Searle 1990a) fall roughly into three categories: (1) those that focus on problems with the _argument_ for the Connection Principle; (2) those that focus on problems in understanding the _conclusion_ of this argument; (3) those that focus on whether the conclusion has the _consequences_ Searle claims for it. I think the Connection Principle is both true and important, but I do not think that Searle's argument establishes it. The problem (...)
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  • In Defence of Speciesism.J. A. Gray - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):22-23.
  • Why Vision is More Than Seeing.Melvyn A. Goodale - 2001 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 31 (sup1):186-214.
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  • Paradoxical Experimental Outcomes and Animal Suffering.Jaylan Sheila Turkkan - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):42-43.
  • Pain, Suffering, and Distress.Aubrey Townsend - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):41-42.
  • Broadening the Welfare Index.Frederick Toates - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):40-41.
  • The Attribution of Suffering.William Timberlake - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):38-40.
  • From One Subjectivity to Another.S. J. Shettleworth & N. Mrosovsky - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):37-38.
  • Animal Well-Being: There Are Many Paths to Enlightenment.Evalyn F. Segal - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):36-37.
  • The Meaning of Speciesism and the Forms of Animal Suffering.S. F. Sapontzis - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):35-36.
  • Emotion, Empathy, and Suffering.Eric A. Salzen - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):34-35.
  • To Suffer, or Not to Suffer? That is the Question.Andrew N. Rowan - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):33-34.
  • Science and Value.Bernard E. Rollin - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):32-33.
  • Suffering as a Behaviourist Views It.Howard Rachlin - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):32-32.
  • Seeking the Sources of Simian Suffering.Melinda A. Novak & Jerrold S. Meyer - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):31-32.
  • The Case for and Difficulties in Using “Demand Areas” to Measure Changes in Well-Being.Yew-Kwang Ng - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):30-31.
  • Consumer Demand: Can We Deal with Differing Priorities?P. Monaghan - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):29-30.
  • Development Experience and the Potential for Suffering: Does “Out of Experience” Mean “Out of Mind”?Michael Mendl - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):28-29.
  • Consumer Demand Theory and Social Behavior: All Chickens Are Not Equal.Joy A. Mench & W. Ray Stricklin - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):28-28.
  • Suffering by Analogy.David McFarland - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):27-27.
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  • Obtaining and Applying Objective Criteria in Animal Welfare.Anne E. Magurran - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):26-27.
  • Hidden Adaptationism.David Magnus & Peter Thiel - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):26-26.
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  • Science and Subjective Feelings.Dale Jamieson - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):25-26.
  • Singer's Intermediate Conclusion.Frank Jackson - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):24-25.
  • Experimental Investigation of Animal Suffering.B. O. Hughes & J. C. Petherick - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):23-24.
  • Animals, Science, and Morality.R. G. Frey - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):22-22.
  • Concepts of Suffering in Veterinary Science.Andrew F. Fraser - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):21-22.
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  • Taking the Animal's Viewpoint Seriously.Michael Allen Fox - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):20-21.
  • The Philosophical Foundations of Animal Welfare.John Dupré - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):19-20.
  • Epistemology, Ethics, and Evolution.Strachan Donnelley - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):18-19.
  • On Singer: More Argument, Less Prescriptivism.David DeGrazia - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):18-18.
  • Animal Suffering: The Practical Way Forward.Robert Dantzer - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):17-18.
  • On the Neurobiological Basis of Suffering.C. Richard Chapman - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):16-17.
  • Having the Imagination to Suffer, and to Prevent Suffering.Richard W. Byrne - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):15-16.
  • The Importance of Measures of Poor Welfare.D. M. Broom - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):14-14.
  • The Significance of Seeking the Animal's Perspective.Arnold Arluke - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):13-14.
  • Ethological Motivational Theory as a Basis for Assessing Animal Suffering.John Archer - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):12-13.
  • The Significance of Animal Suffering.Peter Singer - 1990 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (1):9-12.