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Ruth R. Faden & Tom L. Beauchamp (1988). A History and Theory of Informed Consent.

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  1. The Right to Accessible and Acceptable Healthcare Services. Negotiating Rules and Solutions With Members of Ethnocultural Minorities.Fabio Macioce - forthcoming - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry:1-10.
    The right to health implies, among other things, that individuals and communities must be allowed to have a voice in decisions concerning the definition of their well-being. The article argues for a more active participation of ethnocultural minorities in healthcare decisions and highlights the relevance of strategies aimed at creating a bottom-up engagement of people and groups, as well as of measures aimed at a broader organizational flexibility, in order to meet migrants’ and minorities’ needs. Finally, the article clarifies that (...)
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  2.  16
    Pow(D)Er to the People? Voter Manipulation, Legitimacy, and the Relevance of Moral Psychology for Democratic Theory.Norbert Paulo & Christoph Bublitz - forthcoming - Neuroethics:1-17.
    What should we do if climate change or global injustice require radical policy changes not supported by the majority of citizens? And what if science shows that the lacking support is largely due to shortcomings in citizens’ individual psychology such as cognitive biases that lead to temporal and geographical parochialism? Could then a plausible case for enhancing the morality of the electorate—even against their will –be made? But can a democratic government manipulate the will of the people without losing democratic (...)
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  3.  10
    Should Neuroscience Inform Judgements of Decision-Making Capacity?Andrew Peterson - forthcoming - Neuroethics:1-19.
    In this article, I present an argument that suggests neuroscience should inform judgments of decision-making capacity. First, I review key behavioral and neurocognitive data to demonstrate that neuroscientific tests might be predictive of decision-making capacity, and that these tests might inform clinical judgments of capacity. Second, I argue that, consistent with the principles of autonomy and justice, such data should inform judgements of decision-making capacity. While the neuroscience of decision-making capacity still requires time to mature, there is strong reason to (...)
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  4.  6
    Lost in ‘Culturation’: Medical Informed Consent in China.Vera Lúcia Raposo - forthcoming - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy.
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  5.  3
    When Religion and Medicine Clash: Non-Beneficial Treatments and Hope for a Miracle.Philip M. Rosoff - forthcoming - HEC Forum:1-21.
    Patient and family demands for the initiation or continuation of life-sustaining medically non-beneficial treatments continues to be a major issue. This is especially relevant in intensive care units, but is also a challenge in other settings, most notably with cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Differences of opinion between physicians and patients/families about what are appropriate interventions in specific clinical situations are often fraught with highly strained emotions, and perhaps none more so when the family bases their desires on religious belief. In this essay, (...)
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  6.  4
    Myth or Magic? Towards a Revised Theory of Informed Consent in Medical Research.Bert Heinrichs - 2019 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 44 (1):33-49.
    Although the principle of informed consent is well established and its importance widely acknowledged, it has met with criticism for decades. Doubts have been raised for a number of different reasons. In particular, empirical data show that people regularly fail to reproduce the information provided to them. Many critics agree, therefore, that the received concept of informed consent is no more than a myth. Strategies to overcome this problem often rest on a flawed concept of informed consent. In this paper, (...)
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  7.  1
    Why Prohibiting Donor Compensation Can Prevent Plasma Donors From Giving Their Informed Consent to Donate.James Stacey Taylor - 2019 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 44 (1):10-32.
    In recent years, there has been a considerable increase in the degree of philosophical attention devoted to the question of the morality of offering financial compensation in an attempt to increase the medical supply of human body parts and products, such as plasma. This paper will argue not only that donor compensation is ethically acceptable, but that plasma donors should not be prohibited from being offered compensation if they are to give their informed consent to donate. Regulatory regimes that prohibit (...)
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  8.  24
    The Impossibility of Reliably Determining the Authenticity of Desires: Implications for Informed Consent.Jesper Ahlin - 2018 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 21 (1):43-50.
    It is sometimes argued that autonomous decision-making requires that the decision-maker’s desires are authentic, i.e., “genuine,” “truly her own,” “not out of character,” or similar. In this article, it is argued that a method to reliably determine the authenticity (or inauthenticity) of a desire cannot be developed. A taxonomy of characteristics displayed by different theories of authenticity is introduced and applied to evaluate such theories categorically, in contrast to the prior approach of treating them individually. The conclusion is drawn that, (...)
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  9.  4
    In Defense of “Denial”: Difficulty Knowing When Beliefs Are Unrealistic and Whether Unrealistic Beliefs Are Bad.J. S. Blumenthal-Barby & Peter A. Ubel - 2018 - American Journal of Bioethics 18 (9):4-15.
    Bioethicists often draw sharp distinctions between hope and states like denial, self-deception, and unrealistic optimism. But what, exactly, is the difference between hope and its more suspect cousins? One common way of drawing the distinction focuses on accuracy of belief about the desired outcome: Hope, though perhaps sometimes misplaced, does not involve inaccuracy in the way that these other states do. Because inaccurate beliefs are thought to compromise informed decision making, bioethicists have considered these states to be ones where intervention (...)
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  10.  29
    Manipulation and Deception.Shlomo Cohen - 2018 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 96 (3):483-497.
    ABSTRACTThis paper introduces the category of ‘non-deceptive manipulation that causes false beliefs’, analyzes how it narrows the traditional scope of ‘deception’, and draws moral implications.
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  11.  5
    Intersexual Births: The Epistemology of Sex and Ethics of Sex Assignment.Matteo Cresti, Elena Nave & Roberto Lala - 2018 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 15 (4):557-568.
    This article aims to analyse a possible manner of approaching the birth of intersexual children. We start out by summing up what intersexuality is and how it is faced in the dominant clinical practice. We then argue against this paradigm, in favour of a postponement of genital surgery. In the second part of this paper, we take into consideration the general question of whether only two existing sexes are to be recognized, arguing in favour of an expansion of sex categories. (...)
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  12.  5
    Ethical Considerations for HIV Cure-Related Research at the End of Life.Karine Dubé, Sara Gianella, Susan Concha-Garcia, Susan J. Little, Andy Kaytes, Jeff Taylor, Kushagra Mathur, Sogol Javadi, Anshula Nathan, Hursch Patel, Stuart Luter, Sean Philpott-Jones, Brandon Brown & Davey Smith - 2018 - BMC Medical Ethics 19 (1):83.
    The U.S. National Institute of Allergies and Infectious Diseases and the National Institute of Mental Health have a new research priority: inclusion of terminally ill persons living with HIV in HIV cure-related research. For example, the Last Gift is a clinical research study at the University of California San Diego for PLWHIV who have a terminal illness, with a prognosis of less than 6 months. As end-of-life HIV cure research is relatively new, the scientific community has a timely opportunity to (...)
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  13.  2
    The Ethics of Relationality in Implementation and Evaluation Research in Global Health: Reflections From the Dream-A-World Program in Kingston, Jamaica.Nicole A. D’Souza, Jaswant Guzder, Frederick Hickling & Danielle Groleau - 2018 - BMC Medical Ethics 19 (S1).
    Background Despite recent developments aimed at creating international guidelines for ethical global health research, critical disconnections remain between how global health research is conducted in the field and the institutional ethics frameworks intended to guide research practice. Discussion In this paper we attempt to map out the ethical tensions likely to arise in global health fieldwork as researchers negotiate the challenges of balancing ethics committees’ rules and bureaucracies with actual fieldwork processes in local contexts. Drawing from our research experiences with (...)
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  14. Moving Forward on Consent Practices in Australia.Rebekah E. McWhirter & Lisa Eckstein - 2018 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 15 (2):243-257.
    Allowing persons to make an informed choice about their participation in research is a pre-eminent ethical and legal requirement. Almost universally, this requirement has been addressed through the provision of written patient information sheets and consent forms. Researchers and others have raised concerns about the extent to which such forms—particularly given their frequent lengthiness and complexity—provide participants with the tools and knowledge necessary for autonomous decision-making. Concerns are especially pronounced for certain participant groups, such as persons with low literacy and (...)
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  15.  4
    Forget Evil: Autonomy, the Physician–Patient Relationship, and the Duty to Refer.Jake Greenblum & T. J. Kasperbauer - 2018 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 15 (3):313-317.
    Aulisio and Arora argue that the moral significance of value imposition explains the moral distinction between traditional conscientious objection and non-traditional conscientious objection. The former objects to directly performing actions, whereas the latter objects to indirectly assisting actions on the grounds that indirectly assisting makes the actor morally complicit. Examples of non-traditional conscientious objection include objections to the duty to refer. Typically, we expect physicians who object to a practice to refer, but the non-traditional conscientious objector physician refuses to refer. (...)
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  16.  2
    ‘He Didn’T Want to Let His Team Down’: The Challenge of Dual Loyalty for Team Physicians.Stephen S. Hanson - 2018 - Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 45 (3):215-227.
    ABSTRACTTeam physicians have a complicated job that involves potentially conflicting obligations to multiple entities. Though responsible for the medical care of the athletes as individuals, they also have obligations to the team that employs them which can include returning athletes to play who are at heightened risk of re-injury. The fact that the athletes and owners have some overlapping interests only complicates this issue. Further, there are strong financial incentives to do what is necessary to obtain and keep a position (...)
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  17.  2
    Error Trawling and Fringe Decision Competence: Ethical Hazards in Monitoring and Address Patient Decision Capacity in Clinical Practice.Thomas Hartvigsson, Christian Munthe & Gun Forsander - 2018 - Clinical Ethics 13 (3):126-136.
    This article addresses how health professionals should monitor and safeguard their patients’ ability to participate in making clinical decisions and making subsequent decisions regarding the implementation of their treatment plan. Patient participation in clinical decision-making is essential, e.g. in self-care, where patients are responsible for most ongoing care. We argue that one common, fact-oriented patient education strategy may in practice easily tend to take a destructive form that we call error trawling. Illustrating with empirical findings from a video study of (...)
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  18.  2
    Taking Respect Seriously: Clinical Research and the Demands of Informed Consent.Lynn A. Jansen - 2018 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 43 (3):342-360.
    There is broad agreement among research ethicists that investigators have a duty to obtain the informed consent of all subjects who participate in their research trials. On a common view, the duty to obtain this informed consent follows from the need to respect persons and their autonomous decisions. However, the nature of informed consent and the demands it places on investigators are open to dispute and recently have been challenged. Respect for persons, it has been claimed, does not require investigators (...)
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  19.  1
    “I Didn’T Have Anything to Decide, I Wanted to Help My Kids”—An Interview-Based Study of Consent Procedures for Sampling Human Biological Material for Genetic Research in Rural Pakistan.Nana Cecilie Halmsted Kongsholm, Jesper Lassen & Peter Sandøe - 2018 - Ajob Empirical Bioethics 9 (3):113-127.
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  20.  6
    Educational Video-Assisted Versus Conventional Informed Consent for Trauma-Related Debridement Surgery: A Parallel Group Randomized Controlled Trial.Yen-Ko Lin, Chao-Wen Chen, Wei-Che Lee, Yuan-Chia Cheng, Tsung-Ying Lin, Chia-Ju Lin, Leiyu Shi, Yin-Chun Tien & Liang-Chi Kuo - 2018 - BMC Medical Ethics 19 (1):23.
    We investigated whether, in the emergency department, educational video-assisted informed consent is superior to the conventional consent process, to inform trauma patients undergoing surgery about the procedure, benefits, risks, alternatives, and postoperative care. We conducted a prospective randomized controlled trial, with superiority study design. All trauma patients scheduled to receive trauma-related debridement surgery in the ED of Kaohsiung Medical University Hospital were included. Patients were assigned to one of two education protocols. Participants in the intervention group watched an educational video (...)
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  21.  12
    Building a Trustworthy Precision Health Research Enterprise.David Magnus & Jason N. Batten - 2018 - American Journal of Bioethics 18 (4):1-2.
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  22.  1
    Autonomy, Well-Being, and the Value of Genetic Testing for Adopted Persons.Thomas May & Harold Grotevant - 2018 - HEC Forum 30 (3):283-295.
    This paper argues that the value of genetic-relative family health history information and the notion that lack of this information is a disadvantage can be established through its role as a nested goal in comprehensive life projects independent of documentation of particular health outcomes. Health information often plays a significant role in a person's formulation of life goals and projects, as well as in identification of plausible effective means to realize these goals. If health outcomes are valuable in part because (...)
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  23.  5
    Community Engagement and Field Trials of Genetically Modified Insects and Animals.Carolyn P. Neuhaus - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (1):25-36.
    New techniques for the genetic modification of organisms are creating new strategies for addressing persistent public health challenges. For example, the company Oxitec has conducted field trials internationally—and has attempted to conduct field trials in the United States—of a genetically modified mosquito that can be used to control dengue, Zika, and some other mosquito-borne diseases. In 2016, a report commissioned by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine discussed the potential benefits and risks of another strategy, using gene drives. (...)
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  24.  2
    Physicians’ Framing and Recommendations. Are They Nudging? And Do They Violate the Requirements of Informed Consent?Thomas Ploug - 2018 - Journal of Medical Ethics 44 (8):543-544.
    In his recent article ‘Nudging, Informed Consent and Bullshit’, William Simkulet1 convincingly argues that certain types of nudging satisfy Frankfurt’s criteria of bullshit. As a prelude to this argument, Simkulet considers whether recommendations and framing are types of nudging and whether they satisfy the requirement of adequate disclosure essential for a valid informed consent. He defines nudging as the systematic attempt at altering behaviour by non-rational means, and describes adequate disclosure as providing the patient with true information that enables an (...)
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  25.  9
    Public Mental Health and Prevention.Jennifer Radden - 2018 - Public Health Ethics 11 (2):126-138.
    Although employed throughout health-related rhetoric and research today, prevention it is an ambiguous and complicated category when applied to mental and behavioral health. It is analyzed here, along with four ethical issues arising when public health preventative methods and goals involve mental health: age of intervention; resource priorities between prevention and treatment; substantive issues in preventive pedagogies and trade-offs framed by differences of approach. Illustrations include some of the most widespread and ambitious recent preventive models: those aiming to avert subsequent (...)
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  26.  3
    Autonomy, Competence and Non-Interference.Joseph T. F. Roberts - 2018 - HEC Forum 30 (3):235-252.
    In light of the variety of uses of the term autonomy in recent bioethics literature, in this paper, I suggest that competence, not being as contested, is better placed to play the anti-paternalistic role currently assigned to autonomy. The demonstration of competence, I will argue, can provide individuals with robust spheres of non-interference in which they can pursue their lives in accordance with their own values. This protection from paternalism is achieved by granting individuals rights to non-interference upon demonstration of (...)
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  27.  20
    The History of Autonomy in Medicine From Antiquity to Principlism.Toni C. Saad - 2018 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 21 (1):125-137.
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  28.  31
    The Need for Donor Consent in Mitochondrial Replacement.G. Owen Schaefer - 2018 - Journal of Medical Ethics 44 (12):825-829.
    Mitochondrial replacement therapy requires oocytes of women whose mitochondrial DNA will be transmitted to resultant children. These techniques are scientifically, ethically and socially controversial; it is likely that some women who donate their oocytes for general in vitro fertilisation usage would nevertheless oppose their genetic material being used in MRT. The possibility of oocytes being used in MRT is therefore relevant to oocyte donation and should be included in the consent process when applicable. In present circumstances, specific consent should be (...)
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  29.  4
    Recent Insights Into Decision-Making and Their Implications for Informed Consent.Irene M. L. Vos, Maartje H. N. Schermer & Ineke L. L. E. Bolt - 2018 - Journal of Medical Ethics 44 (11):734-738.
    Research from behavioural sciences shows that people reach decisions in a much less rational and well-considered way than was often assumed. The doctrine of informed consent, which is an important ethical principle and legal requirement in medical practice, is being challenged by these insights into decision-making and real-world choice behaviour. This article discusses the implications of recent insights of research on decision-making behaviour for the informed consent doctrine. It concludes that there is a significant tension between the often non-rational choice (...)
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  30.  70
    The Need for Authenticity-Based Autonomy in Medical Ethics.Lucie White - 2018 - HEC Forum 30 (3):191-209.
    The notion of respect for autonomy dominates bioethical discussion, though what qualifies precisely as autonomous action is notoriously elusive. In recent decades, the notion of autonomy in medical contexts has often been defined in opposition to the notion of autonomy favoured by theoretical philosophers. Where many contemporary theoretical accounts of autonomy place emphasis on a condition of “authenticity”, the special relation a desire must have to the self, bioethicists often regard such a focus as irrelevant to the concerns of medical (...)
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  31.  3
    Addressing Vaccine Hesitancy Requires an Ethically Consistent Health Strategy.Laura Williamson & Hannah Glaab - 2018 - BMC Medical Ethics 19 (1):84.
    Vaccine hesitancy is a growing threat to public health. The reasons are complex but linked inextricably to a lack of trust in vaccines, expertise and traditional sources of authority. Efforts to increase immunization uptake in children in many countries that have seen a fall in vaccination rates are two-fold: addressing hesitancy by improving healthcare professional-parent exchange and information provision in the clinic; and, secondly, public health strategies that can override parental concerns and values with coercive measures such as mandatory and (...)
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  32.  8
    Stay Out of the Sunbed! Paternalistic Reasons for Restricting the Use of Sunbeds.Didde Boisen Andersen & Søren Flinch Midtgaard - 2017 - Public Health Ethics 10 (3).
    The use of tanning beds has been identified as being among the most significant causes of melanoma and non-melanoma skin cancer. Accordingly, the activity is properly seen as one that involves profound harm to self. The article examines paternalistic reasons for restricting sunbed usage. We argue that both so-called soft and hard paternalistic arguments support prohibiting the use of sunbeds. We make the following three arguments: an argument from oppressive patterns of socialization suggesting that the autonomous nature of the conduct (...)
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  33.  3
    Informed Consent: A Study of Patients with Life-Threatening Illnesses.Montserrat Busquets & Jordi Caïs - 2017 - Nursing Ethics 24 (4):430-440.
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  34.  17
    Therapy, Enhancement, and Medicine: Challenges for the Doctor–Patient Relationship and Patient Safety.James J. Delaney & David Martin - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 146 (4):831-844.
    There are ethical guidelines that form the foundation of the traditional doctor–patient relationship in medicine. Health care providers are under special obligations to their patients. These include obligations to disclose information, to propose alternative treatments that allow patients to make decisions based on their own values, and to have special concern for patients’ best interests. Furthermore, patients know that these obligations exist and so come to their physicians with a significant level of trust. In this sense, therapeutic medicine significantly differs (...)
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  35.  16
    Relevant Information and Informed Consent in Research: In Defense of the Subjective Standard of Disclosure.Vilius Dranseika, Jan Piasecki & Marcin Waligora - 2017 - Science and Engineering Ethics 23 (1):215-225.
    In this article, we seek to contribute to the debate on the requirement of disclosure in the context of informed consent for research. We defend the subjective standard of disclosure and describe ways to implement this standard in research practice. We claim that the researcher should make an effort to find out what kinds of information are likely to be relevant for those consenting to research. This invites researchers to take empirical survey information seriously, attempt to understand the cultural context, (...)
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  36.  8
    Ethics of Patient Activation: Exploring its Relation to Personal Responsibility, Autonomy and Health Disparities.S. H. Gibert, D. DeGrazia & M. Danis - 2017 - Journal of Medical Ethics 43 (10):670-675.
    Discussions of patient-centred care and patient autonomy in bioethics have tended to focus on the decision-making context and the process of obtaining informed consent, leaving open the question of how patients ought to be counselled in the daily maintenance of their health and management of chronic disease. Patient activation is an increasingly prominent counselling approach and measurement tool that aims to improve patients’ confidence and skills in managing their own health conditions. The strategy, which has received little conceptual or ethical (...)
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  37.  4
    Living Organ Donation and Informed Consent in the United States: Strategies to Improve the Process.Macey L. Henderson & Jed Adam Gross - 2017 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 45 (1):66-76.
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  38.  17
    Reframing Consent for Clinical Research: A Function-Based Approach.Scott Y. H. Kim, David Wendler, Kevin P. Weinfurt, Robert Silbergleit, Rebecca D. Pentz, Franklin G. Miller, Bernard Lo, Steven Joffe, Christine Grady, Sara F. Goldkind, Nir Eyal & Neal W. Dickert - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics 17 (12):3-11.
    Although informed consent is important in clinical research, questions persist regarding when it is necessary, what it requires, and how it should be obtained. The standard view in research ethics is that the function of informed consent is to respect individual autonomy. However, consent processes are multidimensional and serve other ethical functions as well. These functions deserve particular attention when barriers to consent exist. We argue that consent serves seven ethically important and conceptually distinct functions. The first four functions pertain (...)
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  39.  13
    Development and Pilot Testing of an Informed Consent Video for Patients with Limb Trauma Prior to Debridement Surgery Using a Modified Delphi Technique.Yen-Ko Lin, Chao-Wen Chen, Wei-Che Lee, Tsung-Ying Lin, Liang-Chi Kuo, Chia-Ju Lin, Leiyu Shi, Yin-Chun Tien & Yuan-Chia Cheng - 2017 - BMC Medical Ethics 18 (1):1-12.
    Background Ensuring adequate informed consent for surgery in a trauma setting is challenging. We developed and pilot tested an educational video containing information regarding the informed consent process for surgery in trauma patients and a knowledge measure instrument and evaluated whether the audiovisual presentation improved the patients’ knowledge regarding their procedure and aftercare and their satisfaction with the informed consent process. Methods A modified Delphi technique in which a panel of experts participated in successive rounds of shared scoring of items (...)
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  40. Informed Consent in Dentistry.Kevin I. Reid - 2017 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 45 (1):77-94.
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  41.  5
    Omnipresent Health Checks May Result in Over-Responsibilization.Yrrah H. Stol, Maartje H. N. Schermer & Eva C. A. Asscher - 2017 - Public Health Ethics 10 (1).
    Health checks identify disease in individuals without a medical indication. More and more checks are offered by more providers on more risk factors and diseases, so we may speak of an omnipresence of health checks. Current ethical evaluation of health checks considers checks on an individual basis only. However, omnipresent checks have effects over and above the effects of individual health checks. They might give the impression that health is entirely manageable by individual actions and strengthen the norm of individual (...)
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  42.  3
    Research Ethics, Informed Consent and the Disempowerment of First Nation Peoples.Juan M. Tauri - 2017 - Research Ethics 14 (3):1-14.
    Recently, Indigenous commentators have begun to analyse the way in which institutional Research Ethics Boards engage with Indigenous researchers and participants, respond to Indigenous peoples’ concerns with academic research activities, and scrutinise the ethics proposals of Indigenous scholars. Of particular concern for Indigenous commentators is that the work of REBs often results in the marginalisation of Indigenous approaches to knowledge construction and dissemination, especially in relation to the vexed issue of informed consent. Based on analysis of the results of research (...)
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  43.  2
    Does Consent Form Follow Function?Charles Weijer, Jamie Brehaut & Cory E. Goldstein - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics 17 (12):29-31.
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  44.  11
    Why is Coerced Consent Worse Than No Consent and Deceived Consent?David Wendler & Alan Wertheimer - 2017 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 42 (2):114-131.
    The Standard View in research ethics maintains that, under certain conditions, investigators may deceive subjects and may enroll subjects without their consent. In contrast, it is always impermissible to coerce subjects to enroll, even when the same conditions are satisfied. This view raises a question that, as far as we are aware, has received no attention in the literature. Why is it always impermissible to undermine the validity of subjects’ consent through coercion, but it can be permissible to undermine the (...)
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  45.  5
    Attending to the Interrelatedness of the Functions of Consent.Benjamin S. Wilfond & Stephanie A. Kraft - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics 17 (12):12-13.
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  46.  2
    Experimental Subjects and Partial Truth Telling During Technological Change in Radiotherapy.Lisa Anne Wood - 2017 - Nursing Ethics 24 (4):441-451.
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  47.  22
    Feeling Is Believing: Evaluative Conditioning and the Ethics of Pharmaceutical Advertising.Paul Biegler & Patrick Vargas - 2016 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 13 (2):271-279.
    A central goal in regulating direct-to-consumer advertising of prescription pharmaceuticals is to ensure that explicit drug claims are truthful. Yet imagery can also alter viewer attitudes, and the degree to which this occurs in DTCA is uncertain. Addressing this data gap, we provide evidence that positive feelings produced by images can promote favourable beliefs about pharmaceuticals. We had participants view a fictitious anti-influenza drug paired with unrelated images that elicited either positive, neutral or negative feelings. Participants who viewed positive images (...)
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  48.  2
    Moral Implications of Obstetric Technologies for Pregnancy and Motherhood.Susanne Brauer - 2016 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 19 (1):45-54.
  49.  50
    Free Choice and Patient Best Interests.Emma Bullock - 2016 - Health Care Analysis 24 (4):374-392.
    In medical practice, the doctrine of informed consent is generally understood to have priority over the medical practitioner’s duty of care to her patient. A common consequentialist argument for the prioritisation of informed consent above the duty of care involves the claim that respect for a patient’s free choice is the best way of protecting that patient’s best interests; since the patient has a special expertise over her values and preferences regarding non-medical goods she is ideally placed to make a (...)
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    Managing Ethical Challenges to Mental Health Research in Post‐Conflict Settings.Anna Chiumento, Muhammad Naseem Khan, Atif Rahman & Lucy Frith - 2016 - Developing World Bioethics 16 (1):15-28.
    Recently the World Health Organization has highlighted the need to strengthen mental health systems following emergencies, including natural and manmade disasters. Mental health services need to be informed by culturally attuned evidence that is developed through research. Therefore, there is an urgent need to establish rigorous ethical research practice to underpin the evidence-base for mental health services delivered during and following emergencies.
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