Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Lost in ‘Culturation’: Medical Informed Consent in China.Vera Lúcia Raposo - 2019 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 22 (1):17-30.
    Although Chinese law imposes informed consent for medical treatments, the Chinese understanding of this requirement is very different from the European one, mostly due to the influence of Confucianism. Chinese doctors and relatives are primarily interested in protecting the patient, even from the truth; thus, patients are commonly uninformed of their medical conditions, often at the family’s request. The family plays an important role in health care decisions, even substituting their decisions for the patient’s. Accordingly, instead of personal informed consent, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The History of Autonomy in Medicine From Antiquity to Principlism.Toni C. Saad - 2018 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 21 (1):125-137.
    Respect for Autonomy has been a mainstay of medical ethics since its enshrinement as one of the four principles of biomedical ethics by Beauchamp and Childress’ in the late 1970s. This paper traces the development of this modern concept from Antiquity to the present day, paying attention to its Enlightenment origins in Kant and Rousseau. The rapid C20th developments of bioethics and RFA are then considered in the context of the post-war period and American socio-political thought. The validity and utility (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • The Impossibility of Reliably Determining the Authenticity of Desires: Implications for Informed Consent.Jesper Ahlin - 2018 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 21 (1):43-50.
    It is sometimes argued that autonomous decision-making requires that the decision-maker’s desires are authentic, i.e., “genuine,” “truly her own,” “not out of character,” or similar. In this article, it is argued that a method to reliably determine the authenticity (or inauthenticity) of a desire cannot be developed. A taxonomy of characteristics displayed by different theories of authenticity is introduced and applied to evaluate such theories categorically, in contrast to the prior approach of treating them individually. The conclusion is drawn that, (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • Do We Need a Threshold Conception of Competence?Govert den Hartogh - 2016 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 19 (1):71-83.
    On the standard view we assess a person’s competence by considering her relevant abilities without reference to the actual decision she is about to make. If she is deemed to satisfy certain threshold conditions of competence, it is still an open question whether her decision could ever be overruled on account of its harmful consequences for her. In practice, however, one normally uses a variable, risk dependent conception of competence, which really means that in considering whether or not to respect (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Consent to Epistemic Interventions: A Contribution to the Debate on the Right (Not) to Know.Niels Nijsingh - 2016 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 19 (1):103-110.
    The debate on the ‘right to know’ has simmered on for over 30 years. New examples where a right to be informed is contrasted to a right to be kept in ignorance occasionally surface and spark disagreement on the extent to which patients and research subjects have a right to be self-determining concerning the health related information they receive. Up until now, however, this debate has been unsatisfactory with regard to the question what type of rights—if any—are in play here (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Moral Implications of Obstetric Technologies for Pregnancy and Motherhood.Susanne Brauer - 2016 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 19 (1):45-54.
    Drawing on sociological and anthropological studies, the aim of this article is to reconstruct how obstetric technologies contribute to a moral conception of pregnancy and motherhood, and to evaluate that conception from a normative point of view. Obstetrics and midwifery, so the assumption, are value-laden, value-producing and value-reproducing practices, values that shape the social perception of what it means to be a “good” pregnant woman and to be a “good” mother. Activities in the medical field of reproduction contribute to “kinning”, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • “The Angel of the House” in the Realm of ART: Feminist Approach to Oocyte and Spare Embryo Donation for Research. [REVIEW]Anna Alichniewicz & Monika Michalowska - 2014 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 17 (1):123-129.
    The spectacular progress in assisted reproduction technology that has been witnessed for the past thirty years resulted in emerging new ethical dilemmas as well as the revision of some perennial ones. The paper aims at a feminist approach to oocyte and spare embryo donation for research. First, referring to different concepts of autonomy and informed consent, we discuss whether the decision to donate oocyte/embryo can truly be an autonomous choice of a female patient. Secondly, we argue the commonly adopted language (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Can Our Understanding of Informed Consent Be Strengthened Using the Idea of Cluster Concepts?Wayne Xavier Shandera - 2013 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (4):679-682.
    Informed consent is thought to exist as a well-defined entity. Altered concepts of patient autonomy, differential cultural understanding of the entity, and the failure of clients to distinguish between research and clinical ethics, and various hierarchical cultural views of informed consent all suggest that alterations may be needed in the traditional concept. By using the methodology outlined by Gasking in which he defines the idea of “cluster concepts,” one may be able to enlarge the definition and augment the understanding of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Informed Consent: Between Waiver and Excellence in Responsible Deliberation: Neil. C. Manson and Onora O’Neill, Rethinking Informed Consent in Bioethics. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 2007, 226 Pages, Price: £18.99, ISBN 978-0-521-87458-8. [REVIEW]Y. Michael Barilan - 2010 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 13 (1):89-95.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Respect for Persons, Respect for Integrity: Remarks for the Conceptualization of Integrity in Social Ethics.Roger Fjellstrom - 2004 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 8 (2):231-242.
    Even though respect for integrity is hailed in several authoritative legal and ethical documents, and is typically presented as a complement to respect for autonomy, it is largely neglected in many leading works in ethics. Is such neglect warranted, or does it express a prejudice? This article argues that the latter is the case, and that this is due to misplaced conceptual concerns. It offers some proposals as regards the conceptualization of integrity in social ethics in general and in biomedical (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • The Right to Withdraw Consent to Research on Biobank Samples.Gert Helgesson & Linus Johnsson - 2005 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 8 (3):315-321.
    Ethical guidelines commonly state that research subjects should have a right to withdraw consent to participate. According to the guidelines we have studied, this right applies also to research on biological samples. However, research conducted on human subjects themselves differs in important respects from research on biological samples. It is therefore not obvious that the same rights should be granted research participants in the two cases. This paper investigates arguments for and against granting a right to withdraw consent to research (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • Patient Autonomy: A View From the Kitchen.Rita M. Struhkamp - 2004 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 8 (1):105-114.
    In contemporary liberal ethics patient autonomy is often interpreted as the right to self-determination: when it comes to treatment decisions, the patient is given the right to give or withhold informed consent. This paper joins in the philosophical and ethical criticism of the liberal interpretation as it does not regard patient autonomy as a right, rule or principle, but rather as a practice. Patient autonomy, or so I will argue, is realised in the concrete activities of day-to-day health care, in (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Influenza Vaccination in Dutch Nursing Homes: Is Tacit Consent Morally Justified?M. F. Verweij & M. A. Van den Hoven - 2004 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 8 (1):89-95.
    Objectives: Efficient procedures for obtaining informed (proxy) consent may contribute to high influenza vaccination rates in nursing homes. Yet are such procedures justified? This study’s objective was to gain insight in informed consent policies in Dutch nursing homes; to assess how these may affect influenza vaccination rates and to answer the question whether deviating from standard informed consent procedures could be morally justified. Design: A survey among nursing home physicians. Setting & Participants: We sent a questionnaire to all (356) nursing (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Concise Argument.Savulescu Julian - 2017 - Journal of Medical Ethics 43 (3):135-136.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Race, Religion, and Informed Consent - Lessons From Social Science.Dayna Bowen Matthew - 2008 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 36 (1):150-173.
    Patients belonging to ethnic, racial, and religious minorities have been all but excluded from the legal academy's on-going conversation about informed consent. This article repairs that egregious omission. It begins by observing the narrowing of ethical justifications that underlie our informed consent law, tracing the ethical literature from the ancients to modern formulations of autonomy-centered models. Next, this article reviews the vast body of empirical data available in social science literature, that demonstrates how distinct from the autonomy model the broad (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • Objectually Understanding Informed Consent.Daniel A. Wilkenfeld - forthcoming - Analytic Philosophy.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Informed Consent in Medicine in Comparison with Consent in Other Areas of Human Activity.Steve Clarke - 2001 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 39 (2):169-187.
  • Consent and the Problem of Framing Effects.Jason Hanna - 2011 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 14 (5):517-531.
    Our decision-making is often subject to framing effects: alternative but equally informative descriptions of the same options elicit different choices. When a decision-maker is vulnerable to framing, she may consent under one description of the act, which suggests that she has waived her right, yet be disposed to dissent under an equally informative description of the act, which suggests that she has not waived her right. I argue that in such a case the decision-maker’s consent is simply irrelevant to the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  • An Australian Based Study on the Readability of HIV/AIDS and Type 2 Diabetes Clinical Trial Informed Consent Documents.Caroline Jones - 2010 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 7 (3):313-319.
    The aims of this study were to measure the readability of Australian based informed consent documents and determine whether informed consent readability guidelines have been established by Australian human research ethics committees (HRECs). A total of 20 informed consent documents, 10 HIV/AIDS and 10 type 2 diabetes, were measured for readability using the Simple Measure of Gobbledygook (SMOG) and Gunning Fog Index (Fog). Published guidelines and policy statements of the two local HREC who approved the 20 clinical trials under study (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Authority and the Future of Consent in Population-Level Biomedical Research.Mark Sheehan, Rachel Thompson, Jon Fistein, Jim Davies, Michael Dunn, Michael Parker, Julian Savulescu & Kerrie Woods - forthcoming - Public Health Ethics.
    Population-level biomedical research has become crucial to the health system’s ability to improve the health of the population. This form of research raises a number of well-documented ethical concerns, perhaps the most significant of which is the inability of the researcher to obtain fully informed specific consent from participants. Two proposed technical solutions to this problem of consent in large-scale biomedical research that have become increasingly popular are meta-consent and dynamic consent. We critically examine the ethical and practical credentials of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Development and pilot testing of an informed consent video for patients with limb trauma prior to debridement surgery using a modified Delphi technique.Yen-Ko Lin, Chao-Wen Chen, Wei-Che Lee, Tsung-Ying Lin, Liang-Chi Kuo, Chia-Ju Lin, Leiyu Shi, Yin-Chun Tien & Yuan-Chia Cheng - 2017 - BMC Medical Ethics 18 (1):67.
    Ensuring adequate informed consent for surgery in a trauma setting is challenging. We developed and pilot tested an educational video containing information regarding the informed consent process for surgery in trauma patients and a knowledge measure instrument and evaluated whether the audiovisual presentation improved the patients’ knowledge regarding their procedure and aftercare and their satisfaction with the informed consent process. A modified Delphi technique in which a panel of experts participated in successive rounds of shared scoring of items to forecast (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Applying “Place” to Research Ethics and Cultural Competence/Humility Training.Dianne Quigley - 2016 - Journal of Academic Ethics 14 (1):19-33.
    Research ethics principles and regulations typically have been applied to the protection of individual human subjects. Yet, new paradigms of research that include the place-based community and cultural groups as partners or participants of environmental research interventions, in particular, require attention to place-based identities and geographical contexts. This paper argues the importance of respecting “place” within human subjects protections applied to communities and cultural groups as part of a critical need for research ethics and cultural competence training for graduate research (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Picking and Choosing Among Phase I Trials: A Qualitative Examination of How Healthy Volunteers Understand Study Risks.Jill A. Fisher, Torin Monahan & Rebecca L. Walker - 2019 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 16 (4):535-549.
    This article empirically examines how healthy volunteers evaluate and make sense of the risks of phase I clinical drug trials. This is an ethically important topic because healthy volunteers are exposed to risk but can gain no medical benefit from their trial participation. Based on in-depth qualitative interviews with 178 healthy volunteers enrolled in various clinical trials, we found that participants focus on myriad characteristics of clinical trials when assessing risk and making enrolment decisions. These factors include the short-term and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Feeling Is Believing: Evaluative Conditioning and the Ethics of Pharmaceutical Advertising.Paul Biegler & Patrick Vargas - 2016 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 13 (2):271-279.
    A central goal in regulating direct-to-consumer advertising of prescription pharmaceuticals is to ensure that explicit drug claims are truthful. Yet imagery can also alter viewer attitudes, and the degree to which this occurs in DTCA is uncertain. Addressing this data gap, we provide evidence that positive feelings produced by images can promote favourable beliefs about pharmaceuticals. We had participants view a fictitious anti-influenza drug paired with unrelated images that elicited either positive, neutral or negative feelings. Participants who viewed positive images (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • The Notion of Free Will and its Ethical Relevance for Decision-Making Capacity.Tobias Zürcher, Bernice Elger & Manuel Trachsel - 2019 - BMC Medical Ethics 20 (1):31.
    Obtaining informed consent from patients is a moral and legal duty and, thus, a key legitimation for medical treatment. The pivotal prerequisite for valid informed consent is decision-making capacity of the patient. Related to the question of whether and when consent should be morally and legally valid, there has been a long-lasting philosophical debate about freedom of will and the connection of freedom and responsibility. The scholarly discussion on decision-making capacity and its clinical evaluation does not sufficiently take into account (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Be Careful What You Wish For? Theoretical and Ethical Aspects of Wish-Fulfilling Medicine.Alena M. Buyx - 2008 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 11 (2):133-143.
    There is a growing tendency for medicine to be used not to prevent or heal illnesses, but to fulfil individual personal wishes such as wishes for enhanced work performance, better social skills, children with specific characteristics, stress relief, a certain appearance or a better sex life. While recognizing that the subject of wish-fulfilling medicine may vary greatly and that it may employ very different techniques, this article argues that wish-fulfilling medicine can be described as a cohesive phenomenon with distinctive features. (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Public Mental Health and Prevention.Jennifer Radden - 2018 - Public Health Ethics 11 (2):126-138.
    Although employed throughout health-related rhetoric and research today, prevention it is an ambiguous and complicated category when applied to mental and behavioral health. It is analyzed here, along with four ethical issues arising when public health preventative methods and goals involve mental health: age of intervention; resource priorities between prevention and treatment; substantive issues in preventive pedagogies and trade-offs framed by differences of approach. Illustrations include some of the most widespread and ambitious recent preventive models: those aiming to avert subsequent (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • What is in a Name? Parent, Professional and Policy-Maker Conceptions of Consent-Related Language in the Context of Newborn Screening.Stuart G. Nicholls, Holly Etchegary, Laure Tessier, Charlene Simmonds, Beth K. Potter, Jamie C. Brehaut, Daryl Pullman, Robin Z. Hayeems, Sari Zelenietz, Monica Lamoureux, Jennifer Milburn, Lesley Turner, Pranesh Chakraborty & Brenda J. Wilson - 2019 - Public Health Ethics 12 (2):158-175.
    Newborn bloodspot screening programs are some of the longest running population screening programs internationally. Debate continues regarding the need for parents to give consent to having their child screened. Little attention has been paid to how meanings of consent-related terminology vary among stakeholders and the implications of this for practice. We undertook semi-structured interviews with parents, healthcare professionals and policy decision makers in two Canadian provinces. Conceptions of consent-related terms revolved around seven factors within two broad domains, decision-making and information (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Whether to Ignore Them and Spin: Moral Obligations to Resist Sexual Harassment.Carol Hay - 2000 - Hypatia 20 (4):94-108.
    : In this essay, I consider the question of whether women have an obligation to confront men who sexually harass them. A reluctance to be guilty of blaming the victims of harassment, coupled with other normative considerations that tell in favor of the unfairness of this sort of obligation, might make us think that women never have an obligation to confront their harassers. But I argue that women do have this obligation, and it is not overridden by many of the (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Should Paramedics Ever Accept Patients' Refusal of Treatment or Further Assessment?Halvor Nordby - 2013 - BMC Medical Ethics 14 (1):1-5.
    BackgroundThis case report discusses an ethical communication dilemma in prehospital patient interaction, involving a patient who was about to board a plane at a busy airport. The article argues that the situation raised dilemmas about communication, patient autonomy and paternalism. Paramedics should be able to find good solutions to these dilemmas, but they have not received much attention in the literature on prehospital ambulance work.Case presentationThe patient had chest pains that were consistent with serious heart disease, but she wanted to (...)
    Direct download (12 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Fertility Preservation Technologies for Women: A Feminist Ethical Analysis.Petropanagos Angel - unknown
    In this dissertation I examine ethical issues that concern fertility preservation technologies for women from a feminist perspective. FP technologies involve the removal, cryopreservation and subsequent storage of reproductive materials for future use. The aim of these technologies is to preserve the option of future genetic reproduction. FP technologies have been developed in the cancer context because infertility is one of the long-term side-effects of many cancers or cancer therapies. Many FP technologies are still experimental, but some technologies are becoming (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Race, Religion, and Informed Consent — Lessons From Social Science.Dayna Bowen Matthew - 2008 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 36 (1):150-173.
  • Building Norms for Organ Donation in China: Pitfalls and Challenges.Ana S. Iltis - 2019 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 44 (5):640-662.
    In most, if not all, jurisdictions with active organ transplantation programs, there is a persistent desire to increase donation rates because the demand for transplantable organs exceeds the supply. China, in particular, faces an extraordinary gap between the number of organs donated by deceased donors and the number of people seeking one or more transplants. China might look to Western countries with higher donation rates to determine how best to introduce Western practices into the Chinese system. In attempting to increase (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Autonomies in Interaction: Dimensions of Patient Autonomy and Non-Adherence to Treatment.Ion Arrieta Valero - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • On Nudging’s Supposed Threat to Rational Decision-Making.Timothy Houk - 2019 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 44 (4):403-422.
    Nudging is a tool of libertarian paternalism. It involves making use of certain psychological tendencies in order to help people make better decisions without restricting their freedom. However, some have argued that nudging is objectionable because it interferes with, or undermines, the rational decision-making of the nudged agents. Opinions differ on why this is objectionable, but the underlying concerns appear to begin with nudging’s threat to rational decision-making. Those who discuss this issue do not make it clear to what this (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • The Need for Authenticity-Based Autonomy in Medical Ethics.Lucie White - 2018 - HEC Forum 30 (3):191-209.
    The notion of respect for autonomy dominates bioethical discussion, though what qualifies precisely as autonomous action is notoriously elusive. In recent decades, the notion of autonomy in medical contexts has often been defined in opposition to the notion of autonomy favoured by theoretical philosophers. Where many contemporary theoretical accounts of autonomy place emphasis on a condition of “authenticity”, the special relation a desire must have to the self, bioethicists often regard such a focus as irrelevant to the concerns of medical (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Neuro-Interventions as Criminal Rehabilitation: An Ethical Review.Jonathan Pugh & Thomas Douglas - 2017 - In Jonathan D. Jacobs & Jonathan Jackson (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Criminal Justice Ethics. London: Routledge.
    According to a number of influential views in penal theory, 1 one of the primary goals of the criminal justice system is to rehabilitate offenders. Rehabilitativemeasures are commonly included as a part of a criminal sentence. For example, in some jurisdictions judges may order violent offenders to attend anger management classes or to undergo cognitive behavioural therapy as a part of their sentences. In a limited number of cases, neurointerventions — interventions that exert a direct biological effect on the brain (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Understanding, Communication, and Consent.Joseph Millum & Danielle Bromwich - 2018 - Ergo: An Open Access Journal of Philosophy 5:45-68.
    Misconceived Consent: Miguel has stage IV lung cancer. He has nearly exhausted his treatment options when his oncologist, Dr. Llewellyn, tells him about an experimental vaccine trial that may boost his immune response to kill cancer cells. Dr. Llewellyn provides Miguel with a consent form that explains why the study is being conducted, what procedures he will undergo, what the various risks and benefits are, alternative sources of treatment, and so forth. She even sits down with him, carefully talks through (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • How Autonomy Can Legitimate Beneficial Coercion.Lucie White - 2017 - In Jakov Gather, Tanja Henking, Alexa Nossek & Jochen Vollmann (eds.), Beneficial Coercion in Psychiatry? Foundations and Challenges. Münster: Mentis. pp. 85-99.
    Respect for autonomy and beneficence are frequently regarded as the two essential principles of medical ethics, and the potential for these two principles to come into conflict is often emphasised as a fundamental problem. On the one hand, we have the value of beneficence, the driving force of medicine, which demands that medical professionals act to protect or promote the wellbeing of patients or research subjects. On the other, we have a principle of respect for autonomy, which demands that we (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Autism, Neurodiversity, and Equality Beyond the "Normal".Andrew Fenton & Tim Krahn - 2007 - Journal of Ethics in Mental Health 2 (2):2.
    “Neurodiversity” is associated with the struggle for the civil rights of all those diagnosed with neurological or neurodevelopmental disorders. Two basic approaches in the struggle for what might be described as “neuro-equality” are taken up in the literature: There is a challenge to current nosology that pathologizes all of the phenotypes associated with neurological or neurodevelopmental disorders ); there is a challenge to those extant social institutions that either expressly or inadvertently model a social hierarchy where the interests or needs (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  • Bioethics as a Second-Order Discipline: Who is Not a Bioethicist?Loretta Kopelman - 2006 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 31 (6):601 – 628.
    A dispute exists about whether bioethics should become a new discipline with its own methods, competency standards, duties, honored texts, and core curriculum. Unique expertise is a necessary condition for disciplines. Using the current literature, different views about the sort of expertise that might be unique to bioethicists are critically examined to determine if there is an expertise that might meet this requirement. Candidates include analyses of expertise based in "philosophical ethics," "casuistry," "atheoretical or situation ethics," "conventionalist relativism," "institutional guidance," (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  • Consenting to Uncertainty: Challenges for Informed Consent to Disease Screening—a Case Study.Mark Greene & Suzanne M. Smith - 2008 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 29 (6):371-386.
    This paper uses chronic beryllium disease as a case study to explore some of the challenges for decision-making and some of the problems for obtaining meaningful informed consent when the interpretation of screening results is complicated by their probabilistic nature and is clouded by empirical uncertainty. Although avoidance of further beryllium exposure might seem prudent for any individual whose test results suggest heightened disease risk, we will argue that such a clinical precautionary approach is likely to be a mistake. Instead, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Ethics of Sham Surgery in Parkinson's Disease: Back to the Future?Teresa Swift & Richard Huxtable - 2013 - Bioethics 27 (4):175-185.
    Despite intense academic debate in the recent past over the use of ‘sham surgery’ control groups in research, there has been a recent resurgence in their use in the field of neurodegenerative disease. Yet the primacy of ethical arguments in favour of sham surgery controls is not yet established. Preliminary empirical research shows an asymmetry between the views of neurosurgical researchers and patients on the subject, while different ethical guidelines and regulations support conflicting interpretations. Research ethics committees faced with a (...)
    Direct download (13 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Issues Involving Informed Consent for Research Participants with Alzheimer’s Disease.Adnan Qureshi & Amer Johri - 2008 - Journal of Academic Ethics 6 (3):197-203.
    Alzheimer’s disease is the most common form of dementia which is estimated to impact 350,000 people over 65 years of age in Canada. The lack of effective treatment and the growing number of people who are expected to be diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease in the near future are compelling reasons why continued research is in this area is necessary. With additional research, there needs to be greater recognition of the complexity of seeking ongoing informed consent from those with Alzheimer’s disease. (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Empathy, Social Media, and Directed Altruistic Living Organ Donation.Greg Moorlock & Heather Draper - 2018 - Bioethics 32 (5):289-297.
    In this article we explore some of the ethical dimensions of using social media to increase the number of living kidney donors. Social media provides a platform for changing non-identifiable ‘statistical victims’ into ‘real people’ with whom we can identify and feel empathy: the so-called ‘identifiable victim effect’, which prompts charitable action. We examine three approaches to promoting kidney donation using social media which could take advantages of the identifiable victim effect: institutionally organized campaigns based on historical cases aimed at (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • A Normatively Neutral Definition of Paternalism.Emma C. Bullock - 2015 - Philosophical Quarterly 65 (258):1-21.
    In this paper, I argue that a definition of paternalism must meet certain methodological constraints. Given the failings of descriptivist and normatively charged definitions of paternalism, I argue that we have good reason to pursue a normatively neutral definition. Archard's 1990 definition is one such account. It is for this reason that I return to Archard's account with a critical eye. I argue that Archard's account is extensionally inadequate, failing to capture some cases which are clear instances of paternalism. I (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • Recruiting and Educating Participants for Enrollment in HIV-Vaccine Research: Ethical Implications of the Results of an Empirical Investigation.S. Sifunda, P. Reddy, N. Naidoo, S. James & D. Buchanan - 2014 - Public Health Ethics 7 (1):78-85.
    The study reports on the results of an empirical investigation of the education and recruitment processes used in HIV vaccine trials conducted in South Africa. Interviews were conducted with 21 key informants involved in HIV vaccine research in South Africa and three focus groups of community advisory board members. Data analysis identified seven major themes on the relationship between education and recruitment: the process of recruitment, the combined dual role of educators and recruiters, conflicts perceived by field staff, pressure to (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Myth or Magic? Towards a Revised Theory of Informed Consent in Medical Research.Bert Heinrichs - 2019 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 44 (1):33-49.
    Although the principle of informed consent is well established and its importance widely acknowledged, it has met with criticism for decades. Doubts have been raised for a number of different reasons. In particular, empirical data show that people regularly fail to reproduce the information provided to them. Many critics agree, therefore, that the received concept of informed consent is no more than a myth. Strategies to overcome this problem often rest on a flawed concept of informed consent. In this paper, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Payments to Normal Healthy Volunteers in Phase 1 Trials: Avoiding Undue Influence While Distributing Fairly the Burdens of Research Participation.A. S. Iltis - 2009 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 34 (1):68-90.
    Clinical investigators must engage in just subject recruitment and selection and avoid unduly influencing research participation. There may be tension between the practice of keeping payments to participants low to avoid undue influence and the requirements of justice when recruiting normal healthy volunteers for phase 1 drug studies. By intentionally keeping payments low to avoid unduly influenced participation, investigators, on the recommendation or insistence of institutional review boards, may be targeting or systematically recruiting healthy adult members of lower socio-economic groups (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations