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  1. Cambridge Mathematics and Cavendish Physics: Cunningham, Campbell and Einstein's Relativity 1905–1911 Part II: Comparing Traditions in Cambridge Physics. [REVIEW]Andrew Warwick - 1991 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 24 (1):1-25.
  • From Cathode Rays to Alpha Particles to Quantum of Action: A Rational Reconstruction of Structure of the Atom and its Implications for Chemistry Textbooks.Mansoor Niaz - 1998 - Science Education 82 (5):527-552.
  • The Discovery of the Zeeman Effect: A Case Study of the Interplay Between Theory and Experiment.Theodore Arabatzis - 1991 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 23 (3):365-388.
  • J. J. Thomson And The Emergence Of The Cavendish School, 1885–1990.Dong-Won Kim - 1995 - British Journal for the History of Science 28 (2):191-226.
    The history of the Cavendish Laboratory is a fascinating subject to study, not just because this famous centre of experimental physics produced a large number of Nobel Laureates but also because it gives us an insight into the unique milieu of the Cambridge physics community. The evolution of the Cavendish Laboratory, however, was not as smooth as might be expected, and the prestige and reputation of its first directors – James Clerk Maxwell, Lord Rayleigh, Joseph John Thomson and Ernest Rutherford (...)
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  • Johann Wilhelm Hittorf and the Material Culture of Nineteenth-Century Gas Discharge Research.Falk Müller - 2011 - British Journal for the History of Science 44 (2):211-244.
    In the second half of the nineteenth century, gas discharge research was transformed from a playful and fragmented field into a new branch of physical science and technology. From the 1850s onwards, several technical innovations – powerful high-voltage supplies, the enhancement of glass-blowing skills, or the introduction of mercury air-pumps – allowed for a major extension of experimental practices and expansion of the phenomenological field. Gas discharge tubes served as containers in which resources from various disciplinary contexts could be brought (...)
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  • Rethinking the 'Discovery' of the Electron.Theodore Arabatzis - 1996 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 27 (4):405-435.
  • Rethinking the ‘Discovery’ of the Electron.Theodore Arabatzis - 1996 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 27 (4):405-435.
  • How Seeing Became Knowing: The Role of the Electron Microscope in Shaping the Modern Definition of Viruses.Ton van Helvoort & Neeraja Sankaran - 2019 - Journal of the History of Biology 52 (1):125-160.
    This paper examines the vital role played by electron microscopy toward the modern definition of viruses, as formulated in the late 1950s. Before the 1930s viruses could neither be visualized by available technologies nor grown in artificial media. As such they were usually identified by their ability to cause diseases in their hosts and defined in such negative terms as “ultramicroscopic” or invisible infectious agents that could not be cultivated outside living cells. The invention of the electron microscope, with magnification (...)
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  • A Rationale for Mixed Methods Research Programmes in Education.Mansoor Niaz - 2008 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 42 (2):287-305.
    Recent research shows that research programmes in education are not displaced but rather lead to integration. The objective of this study is to present a rationale for mixed methods research programs based on contemporary philosophy of science. This historical reconstruction of episodes from physical science does not agree with the positivist image of science. Quantitative data by itself, does not facilitate progress, neither in the physical sciences nor in the social sciences A historical reconstruction shows that both Piaget and Pascual‐Leone's (...)
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  • Ethers, Religion and Politics in Late-Victorian Physics: Beyond the Wynne Thesis.Richard Noakes - 2005 - History of Science 43 (4):415-455.
  • Explaining Atomic Spectra Within Classical Physics: 1897-1913.Bruno Carazza & Nadia Robotti - 2002 - Annals of Science 59 (3):299-320.
    In this paper we analyse the approach to interpreting atomic spectra in the framework of classical physics from the discovery of the electron in 1897 to Bohr's atomic model of 1913. Taken as a whole, efforts in this direction are part of a remarkable intellectual endeavour in which the classical theoretical framework seems to have been exploited to its full potential. By demonstrating the limits and weaknesses of classical physics in solving the problem of spectral emissions, these attempts opened the (...)
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  • A Rationale for Mixed Methods (Integrative) Research Programmes in Education.Mansoor Niaz - 2008 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 42 (2):287-305.
    Recent research shows that research programmes (quantitative, qualitative and mixed) in education are not displaced (as suggested by Kuhn) but rather lead to integration. The objective of this study is to present a rationale for mixed methods (integrative) research programs based on contemporary philosophy of science (Lakatos, Giere, Cartwright, Holton, Laudan). This historical reconstruction of episodes from physical science (spanning a period of almost 300 years, 17 th to 20 th century) does not agree with the positivist image of science. (...)
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  • J. J. Thomson: The Discovery of the Electron and the Chemists.Michael Chayut - 1991 - Annals of Science 48 (6):527-544.
    This article examines the origins and development of J. J. Thomson's chemical thought, and the reception of his theories by chemists. Thomson's interest in chemical combination and atomic theories of matter dates from his formative schooldays at Owens College, Manchester. These themes constituted a persistent leitmotif in the development of Thomson's style of thought, and provided a powerful stimulus which enabled him to enunciate the concept of electrons as fundamental particles. Thomson's influence on chemists during the years 1903 to 1923 (...)
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  • J. J. Thomson at the Cavendish Laboratory: The History of an Electric Charge Measurement.Nadia Robotti - 1995 - Annals of Science 52 (3):265-284.
    J. J. Thomson's discovery of the negatively charged corpuscle in 1897 is customarily regarded as the discovery of the electron. Thomson, however, did not immediately equate the charge of his corpuscle with the unitary charge, that is the ‘electron’, first proposed by Stoney in 1874. The aim of this paper is to clarify the means by which this identification was eventually made. To do this the work carried out by Thomson and his students at the Cavendish Laboratory between 1897 and (...)
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  • Progressive Transitions in Chemistry Teachers’ Understanding of Nature of Science Based on Historical Controversies.Mansoor Niaz - 2009 - Science & Education 18 (1):43-65.