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  1. Persons and Personification.William Grey, Wayne Hall & Adrian Carter - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (1):57-58.
  • The Revisability of Moral Concepts.Nada Gligorov - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 1 (4):32-34.
  • Charlie Gard and the Weight of Parental Rights to Seek Experimental Treatment.Giles Birchley - 2018 - Journal of Medical Ethics 44 (7):448-452.
    The case of Charlie Gard, an infant with a genetic illness whose parents sought experimental treatment in the USA, brought important debates about the moral status of parents and children to the public eye. After setting out the facts of the case, this article considers some of these debates through the lens of parental rights. Parental rights are most commonly based on the promotion of a child’s welfare; however, in Charlie’s case, promotion of Charlie’s welfare cannot explain every fact of (...)
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  • Naturalism and Constructivism in Metaethics.Sofia Bonicalzi, Leonardo Caffo & Mattia Sorgon (eds.) - 2014 - Cambridge: Cambridge Scholars Publishing.
    In this collection of essays, several authors, belonging to different generations and philosophical traditions, discuss ample ethical and metaethical issues together with their relations to questions of applied ethics. The volume provides a wide account of some of the main topics in these fields, thus dealing with nearly everything that human beings hold as valuable. -/- Expert scholars and young researchers contribute to this virtual symposium, reframing the current philosophical debates about the definition and the history of the concept of (...)
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  • The Cognitive Psychology of the Potentiality Argument.Lincoln Frias & Noel Struchiner - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics 13 (1):36-38.
  • When Potential Does Not Matter: What Developments in Cellular Biology Tell Us About the Concept of Legal Personhood.Jonathan Will, Eli Y. Adashi & I. Glenn Cohen - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics 13 (1):38-40.
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  • Identifying Challenges and Conditions for the Use of Neuroscience in Bioethics.Eric Racine - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (1):74-76.
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  • Illusions About Persons.James Lindemann Nelson - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (1):65-66.
  • Personhood: Elusive But Not Illusory.John Banja - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (1):60-62.
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  • Persons, Metaphysics and Ethics.Walter Glannon - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (1):68-69.
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  • Personhood: Empirical Thing or Rational Concept?Christopher Meyers - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (1):63-65.
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  • Is Personhood an Illusion?Zahra Meghani - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (1):62-63.
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  • Neuroscience and Metaphysics.Chris Buford & Fritz Allhoff - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (1):58-60.
    In "Imaging or Imagining? A Neuroethics Challenge Informed by Genetics," Judy Illes and Eric Racine argue that "traditional bioethics analysis" (TBA) is insufficient to deal with moral and metaphysical challenges endemic to recent developments in neuroscience, apparently because they believe that these developments differ in kind, not merely degree, from previous developments. This article suggests that recent neuroscientific developments do not have any metaphysical implications that pose the sort of challenge with which Illes and Racine are concerned. Illes and Racine's (...)
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  • The Illusion of Personhood.Adina L. Roskies - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (1):55-57.
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  • Border Zones of Consciousness: Another Immigration Debate?Joseph J. Fins - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (1):51-54.
  • The Necessary-and-Sufficient Boondoggle.Patricia Smith Churchland - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (1):54-55.
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  • Neuroscience and Metaphysics.Chris Buford & Fritz Allhoff - 2005 - American Journal of Bioethics 5 (2):34 – 36.
    In “Imaging or Imagining? A Neuroethics Challenge In- The assumption at issue here is the assumption that the formed by Genetics,” Judy Illes and Eric Racine (see this ismind literally is the brain (i.e., is numerically identical to sue) argue that “traditional bioethics analysis” (TBA), as de-.
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  • Abortion Law Should Align With Evidence From Neuroscience.Clint Perry & Gidon Felsen - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics 10 (12):49-51.
  • Review of Walter Glannon, Bioethics and the Brain 1. [REVIEW]Thomas W. Clark - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (5):59-60.
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  • Is Neuroscience Relevant to Our Moral Responsibility Practices?Joseph Vukov - 2014 - Journal of Cognition and Neuroethics 2 (2):61-82.
    Some psychologists and philosophers have argued that neuroscience is importantly relevant to our moral responsibility practices, especially to our practices of praise and blame. For consider: on an unprecedented scale, contemporary neuroscience presents us with a mechanistic account of human action. Furthermore, in uential studies – most notoriously, Libet et al. (1983) – seem to show that the brain decides to do things (so to speak) before we consciously make a decision. In light of these ndings, then – or so (...)
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  • The Neuroscience of a Person Network.Elizabeth A. Phelps - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (1):49 – 50.
  • Putting Psychology Before Metaphysics in Moral Responsibility: Reactive Attitudes and a “Gut Feeling” That Can Trigger and Justify Them.Robert Schroer & Jeanine Weekes Schroer - 2019 - Philosophical Psychology 32 (3):357-387.
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  • Enduring Questions and the Ethics of Memory Blunting.Joseph Vukov - 2017 - Journal of the American Philosophical Association 3 (2):227-246.
    Memory blunting is a pharmacological intervention that decreases the emotional salience of memories. The technique promises a brighter future for those suffering from memory-related disorders such as PTSD, but it also raises normative questions about the limits of its permissibility. So far, neuroethicists have staked out two primary camps in response to these questions. In this paper, I argue both are problematic. I then argue for an alternative approach to memory blunting, one that can accommodate the considerations that motivate rival (...)
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  • Medicine and Mind-Body Dualism: A Reply to Mehta′s Critique.Callie Joubert - 2014 - Mens Sana Monographs 12 (1):104.
    Neeta Mehta recently advanced the thesis that medical practice is facing a crisis today. In her paper “Mind-body dualism: a critique from a health perspective” she attributes the crisis to the philosophy of Descartes and set out to understand why this dualism is still alive despite its disavowal from philosophers, health practitioners and lay people. The aim of my reply to her critique is three-fold. First, I draw attention to a more fundamental problem and show that dualism is inescapable - (...)
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  • Human Enhancement and Communication: On Meaning and Shared Understanding.Laura Cabrera & John Weckert - 2013 - Science and Engineering Ethics 19 (3):1039-1056.
    Our technologies have enabled us to change both the world and our perceptions of the world, as well as to change ourselves and to find new ways to fulfil the human desire for improvement and for having new capacities. The debate around using technology for human enhancement has already raised many ethical concerns, however little research has been done in how human enhancement can affect human communication. The purpose of this paper is to explore whether some human enhancements could change (...)
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  • Seeing Agents When We Need to, Attributing Experience When We Feel Like It.Ida Hallgren - 2012 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 3 (3):369-382.
    Mind attribution may be divided into the subcategories of attribution of agency, associated with moral agency, and attribution of experience and emotion, associated with moral concern and moral patiency (Gray et al. Science 315(5812):619, 2007; Gray et al. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 108(2):477–479, 2011b; Robbins and Jack Philosophical Studies 127(1):59–85, 2006). In this paper I attend to social context and the different psychological needs influencing the different types of mind attribution. A (...)
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  • Neuroethics: A Conceptual Approach.Michele Farisco, Arleen Salles & Kathinka Evers - 2018 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 27 (4):717-727.
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  • Neuroetica, a Look at the Development of the Italian Debate on Neuroethics.Francesca Minerva - 2013 - Neuroethics 6 (1):233-236.
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  • Neuroimaging:Beginning to Appreciate Its Complexities.Erik Parens & Josephine Johnston - 2014 - Hastings Center Report 44 (s2):S2-S7.
  • Review of Walter Glannon, Bioethics and the Brain. [REVIEW]Thomas W. Clark - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (5):59 – 60.
  • Neuroscience and Norms.Walter Glannon - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 1 (4):31-32.
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  • The Supposed Obligation to Change One's Beliefs About Ethics Because of Discoveries in Neuroscience.Chris Kaposy - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 1 (4):23-30.
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  • Use of the Phrase “Personal Relationship with Jesus”: Toward a Comprehensive Interdisciplinary Explanation.Benjamin Bennett-Carpenter - 2017 - Zygon 52 (3):663-690.
    When people use the phrase “personal relationship with Jesus,” how does one explain its significance? Normally attributed to evangelical Protestant Christians, use of the phrase “personal relationship with Jesus” is a complicated phenomenon, and an explanation of it requires drawing upon resources from across multiple disciplines rather than a single discipline only. Attempts to explain exactly what the phrase “personal relationship with Jesus” means frequently can be mystifying, on the one hand, or dismissive and simplistic, on the other hand. This (...)
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  • Voles, Vasopressin, and Infidelity: A Molecular Basis for Monogamy, a Platform for Ethics, and More?Daniel J. McKaughan - 2012 - Biology and Philosophy 27 (4):521-543.
    Voles are attracting attention because genetic variation at a single locus appears to have a profound impact on a complex social behavior, namely monogamy. After briefly reviewing the state of the most relevant scientific literature, I examine the way that this research gets taken up by the popular media, by scientists, and by the notable philosopher of neuroscience Patricia Churchland and interpreted as having deeply revisionary implications for how we ordinarily understand ourselves as persons. We have all these big questions (...)
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  • Will Neuroscientific Discoveries About Free Will and Selfhood Change Our Ethical Practices?Chris Kaposy - 2009 - Neuroethics 2 (1):51-59.
    Over the past few years, a number of authors in the new field of neuroethics have claimed that there is an ethical challenge presented by the likelihood that the findings of neuroscience will undermine many common assumptions about human agency and selfhood. These authors claim that neuroscience shows that human agents have no free will, and that our sense of being a “self” is an illusory construction of our brains. Furthermore, some commentators predict that our ethical practices of assigning moral (...)
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  • Hindering Harm and Preserving Purity: How Can Moral Psychology Save the Planet?Joshua Rottman, Deborah Kelemen & Liane Young - 2015 - Philosophy Compass 10 (2):134-144.
    The issues of climate change and environmental degradation elicit diverse responses. This paper explores how an understanding of human moral psychology might be used to motivate conservation efforts. Moral concerns for the environment can relate to issues of harm or impurity . Aversions to harm are linked to concern for current or future generations, non-human animals, and anthropomorphized aspects of the environment. Concerns for purity are linked to viewing the environment as imbued with sacred value and therefore worthy of being (...)
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  • Against Scientism, For Personhood.Christian Perring - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (1):67-68.
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  • Response to Open Peer Commentaries on "Personhood and Neuroscience: Naturalizing or Nihilating?": Getting Personal.Martha Farah & Andrea Heberlein - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (1):1-4.
  • Differing Vulnerabilities: The Moral Significance of Lockean Personhood.Russell Blackford - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (1):70-71.
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  • A Transcendental Argument for the Concept of Personhood in Neuroscience.Mark Sagoff - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (1):72-73.