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Problems of Empiricism

Cambridge University Press (1965)

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  1. A Tale of Three Theories: Feyerabend and Popper on Progress and the Aim of Science.Luca Tambolo - 2015 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 51:33-41.
    In this paper, three theories of progress and the aim of science are discussed: the theory of progress as increasing explanatory power, advocated by Popper in The logic of scientific discovery ; the theory of progress as approximation to the truth, introduced by Popper in Conjectures and refutations ; the theory of progress as a steady increase of competing alternatives, which Feyerabend put forward in the essay “Reply to criticism. Comments on Smart, Sellars and Putnam” and defended as late as (...)
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  • "Prólogo" a Karl Poppper: A Lóxica da Descuberta Científica.Juan Vázquez - 2012 - In Servicio de Publicaciones Universidad de Santiago de Compostela (ed.), Clásicos do Pensamento Universal, nº.19,. pp. 15-61.
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  • Sınıftan Kaçan Çocuk.Ismet Sahin - 2014 - Ankara, Turkey: Praksis.
    8-9 Kasım 2012’de, Hacettepe Üniversitesi İngilizce İktisat Bölümü tarafından düzenlenen “Marx, Marksizmler ve Özgürlük” konferansı uzun zamandır üzerinde çalıştığım konular ile ilgili görüşlerimi sunma fırsatı verdi. Praksis dergisini ilk yayınladığım 1996 yılında aşağıda sunduğum düşüncelerimin temellerini atmıştım aslında. Ancak hala teoride ki sorunu bir bütün olarak, Marx ve Engels’te değil Marksizmin kavranılışında olduğunda ısrarcıydım. Çalışmalarım, Marx’ın tarih, diyalektik yöntem, sınıf savaşımı, kapitalizm eleştirisi ve bilim anlayışı gibi pek çok temel konuda tamamen farklı teorik perspektif ve anlayış geliştirmemle sonuçlandı. Bu görüşlerimi (...)
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  • Approximation Versus Idealization: The Kepler-Newton-Case.Rott Hans - unknown
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  • Pluralistic Ontology and Theory Reduction in the Physical Sciences.Fritz Rohrlich - 1988 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 39 (3):295-312.
    It is demonstrated that the reduction of a physical theory S to another one, T, in the sense that S can be derived from T holds in general only for the mathematical framework. The interpretation of S and the associated central terms cannot all be derived from those of T because of the qualitative differences between the cognitive levels of S and T. Their cognitively autonomous status leads to an epistemic as well as an ontological pluralism. This pluralism is consistent (...)
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  • Genes.Philip Kitcher - 1982 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 33 (4):337-359.
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  • Kuhn's Changing Concept of Incommensurability.Howard Sankey - 1993 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 44 (4):759-774.
    Since 1962 Kuhn's concept of incommensurability has undergone a process of transformation. His current account of incommensurability has little in common with his original account of it. Originally, incommensurability was a relation of methodological, observational and conceptual disparity between paradigms. Later Kuhn restricted the notion to the semantical sphere and assimilated it to the indeterminacy of translation. Recently he has developed an account of it as localized translation failure between subsets of terms employed by theories.
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  • Darwin's and Wallace's Revolutionary Research Programme.Scott A. Kleiner - 1985 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 36 (4):367-392.
    Research programmes are sets of problems preferred on epistemic grounds and including preferred heuristics for inquiry. Charles Lyell's research programme for biogeograpy includes the problem of explaining the distribution of species constrained by laws governing locomotion and containment of species. Included in the programme are laws governing the supernatural introduction of replacement species. Wallace and Darwin derected arguments against the putative intelligibility of this aspect of Lyell's programme before discovering natural selection, and their defence, at this time of natural laws (...)
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  • Metaphysics and the Advancement of Science.J. W. N. Watkins - 1975 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 26 (2):91-121.
  • Matter, Motion and Irreversibility. [REVIEW]Peter Clark - 1982 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 33 (2):165-185.
  • Paul Karl Feyerabend Las proyecciones de la proliferación teórica en la relación ciencia-metafísica.María Teresa Gargiulo de Vázquez - 2015 - Anales Del Seminario de Historia de la Filosofía 32 (1).
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  • Hermeneutics of Experimental Science in the Context of the Life-World.Patrick A. Heelan - 1972 - Philosophia Mathematica (2):101-144.
  • Feminist Philosophy of Science1.Lynn Hankinson Nelson - 2002 - In Peter Machamer Michael Silberstein (ed.), The Blackwell Guide to the Philosophy of Science. Blackwell. pp. 312.
  • Scientific Objectivity and Framework Transpositions.Patrick A. Heelan - 1970 - Philosophical Studies 19:55-70.
    The classical notion of scientific objectivity is a property of propositional truth. It is the property of being open to testing and inspection, in principle, by all men, although in practice perhaps, the testing of a scientific claim is restricted to the members of a community of professional experts. It is, moreover, the property of being stable in time, true eternally as it were; for objective truth is thought to express what is so independently of human interests, initiatives, bias, social (...)
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  • El caso Galileo o las Paradojas de una Racionalidad Científica Positivista según Paul Karl Feyerabend.Teresa Gargiulo - 2014 - Tópicos: Revista de Filosofía 47:53-88.
    El caso Galileo significó para Feyerabend la oportunidad de mostrar metodológica e históricamente las paradojas y limitaciones de una noción positivista de ciencia. A través de este hecho paradigmático de la ciencia moderna el vienés demuestra las contradicciones que suponen los distintos intentos del neo-positivismo lógico por establecer un criterio de demarcación que defina qué es la ciencia. Da cuenta de cómo aquellos elementos frente a los cuales el positivismo lógico procura delimitar una definición negativa de ciencia, constituyen paradojalmente el (...)
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  • Defusing Eliminative Materialism: Reference and Revision.Maurice K. D. Schouten & Huib Looren de Jong - 1998 - Philosophical Psychology 11 (4):489-509.
    The doctrine of eliminative materialism holds that belief-desire psychology is massively referentially disconnected. We claim, however, that it is not at all obvious what it means to be referentially (dis)connected. The two major accounts of reference both lead to serious difficulties for eliminativism: it seems that elimination is either impossible or omnipresent. We explore the idea that reference fixation is a much more local, partial, and context-dependent process than was supposed by the classical accounts. This pragmatic view suggests that elimination (...)
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  • La Crítica de Paul Karl Feyerabend Al Modelo Neo-Positivista Del Significado.María Teresa Gargiulo de Vázquez - 2014 - Arbor 190 (769):a168.
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  • On the Historical Origins of the Contemporary Notion of Incommensurability: Paul Feyerabend’s Assault on Conceptual Conservativism.Eric Oberheim - 2005 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 36 (2):363-390.
    This paper investigates the historical origins of the notion of incommensurability in contemporary philosophy of science. The aim is not to establish claims of priority, but to enhance our understanding of the notion by illuminating the various issues that contributed to its development. Kuhn developed his notion of incommensurability primarily under the influence of Fleck, Polanyi, and Köhler. Feyerabend, who had developed his notion more than a decade earlier, drew directly from Duhem, who had developed a notion of incommensurability in (...)
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  • Finitude, Fallibilism and Education Towards Non-Dogmatism: Gadamer’s Hermeneutics in Science Education.Anniina Leiviskä - 2013 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 45 (5):516-530.
    The philosophy of science has witnessed continuous controversy since the mid-twentieth century regarding the justification of science?s privileged position, and which has also reverberated in the philosophy of science education. This contribution brings to the discussion the viewpoint of Hans-Georg Gadamer?s philosophical hermeneutics. I suggest that by relating to the idea of the fallibility of knowledge, Gadamerian philosophy provides a compromise between the extreme positions in the aforementioned debate. Gadamerian hermeneutics also has implications for science education: from the Gadamerian perspective, (...)
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  • Nagel on Reduction.Sahotra Sarkar - 2015 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 53:43-56.
    This paper attempts a critical reappraisal of Nagel's (1961, 1970) model of reduction taking into account both traditional criticisms and recent defenses. This model treats reduction as a type of explanation in which a reduced theory is explained by a reducing theory after their relevant representational items have been suitably connected. In accordance with the deductive-nomological model, the explanation is supposed to consist of a logical deduction. Nagel was a pluralist about both the logical form of the connections between the (...)
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  • A Davidsonian Argument Against Incommensurability.Igor Douven & Henk W. De Regt - 2002 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 16 (2):157 – 169.
    The writings of Kuhn and Feyerabend on incommensurability challenged the idea that science progresses towards the truth. Davidson famously criticized the notion of incommensurability, arguing that it is incoherent. Davidson's argument was in turn criticized by Kuhn and others. This article argues that, although at least some of the objections raised against Davidson's argument are formally correct, they do it very little harm. What remains of the argument once the objections have been taken account of is still quite damaging to (...)
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  • Theoretical Terms and the Principle of the Benefit of Doubt.Igor Douven - 2000 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 14 (2):135 – 146.
    The Principle of the Benefit of Doubt dictates that, whenever reasonably possible, we interpret earlier-day scientists as referring to entities posited by current science. Putnam has presented the principle as supplementary to his Causal Theory of Reference in order to make this theory generally applicable to theoretical terms. The present paper argues that the principle is of doubtful standing. In particular, it will be argued that the principle lacks a justification and, indeed, is unjustifiable as it stands.
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  • DSM-5 and Psychiatry's Second Revolution: Descriptive Vs. Theoretical Approaches to Psychiatric Classification.Jonathan Y. Tsou - 2015 - In Steeves Demazeux & Patrick Singy (eds.), The DSM-5 in Perspective: Philosophical Reflections on the Psychiatric Babel. Springer. pp. 43-62.
    A large part of the controversy surrounding the publication of DSM-5 stems from the possibility of replacing the purely descriptive approach to classification favored by the DSM since 1980. This paper examines the question of how mental disorders should be classified, focusing on the issue of whether the DSM should adopt a purely descriptive or theoretical approach. I argue that the DSM should replace its purely descriptive approach with a theoretical approach that integrates causal information into the DSM’s descriptive diagnostic (...)
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  • Feyerabend ¿un filósofo de la ciencia posmoderno?Teresa Gargiulo - 2017 - Anales Del Seminario de Historia de la Filosofía 34 (1):203-227.
    El pensamiento de Feyerabend ha sido objeto de múltiples y divergentes interpretaciones. Pero entre ellas parece ser unánime la inscripción de su obra dentro de las coordenadas de una epistemología posmoderna. Estas lecturas podrían encontrar sustento en su anarquismo epistemológico el cual constituye en sí mismo una reducción al absurdo de los intentos del positivismo lógico y del racionalismo crítico por definir axiomática o metodológicamente la ciencia. En este sentido, su obra puede ser entendida, en parte, como una argumentación negativa (...)
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  • Karl Popper, Science and Enlightenment.Nicholas Maxwell - 2017 - London: UCL Press.
    Karl Popper is famous for having proposed that science advances by a process of conjecture and refutation. He is also famous for defending the open society against what he saw as its arch enemies – Plato and Marx. Popper’s contributions to thought are of profound importance, but they are not the last word on the subject. They need to be improved. My concern in this book is to spell out what is of greatest importance in Popper’s work, what its failings (...)
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  • Criticism and Revolutions.Mara Beller - 1997 - Science in Context 10 (1):13-37.
  • How Can a Taxonomy of Stances Help Clarify Classical Debates on Scientific Change?Barseghyan Hakob & Shaw Jamie - 2017 - Philosophies 2 (4):24-0.
    In this paper, we demonstrate how a systematic taxonomy of stances can help elucidate two classic debates of the historical turn—the Lakatos–Feyerabend debate concerning theory rejection and the Feyerabend–Kuhn debate about pluralism during normal science. We contend that Kuhn, Feyerabend, and Lakatos were often talking at cross-purposes due to the lack of an agreed upon taxonomy of stances. Specifically, we provide three distinct stances that scientists take towards theories: acceptance of a theory as the best available description of its domain, (...)
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  • Scientific Freedom: Its Grounds and Their Limitations.Torsten Wilholt - 2010 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 41 (2):174-181.
    In various debates about science, appeal is made to the freedom of scientific research. A rationale in favor of this freedom is rarely offered. In this paper, two major arguments are reconstructed that promise to lend support to a principle of scientific freedom. According to the epistemological argument, freedom of research is required in order to organize the collective cognitive effort we call science efficiently. According to the political argument, scientific knowledge needs to be generated in ways that are independent (...)
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  • On Incommensurability.Paul Hoyningen-Huene, Eric Oberheim & Hanne Andersen - 1996 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 27 (1):131-141.
  • Concepts Are Beliefs About Essences.Ulrike Haas-Spohn & Wolfgang Spohn - 2001 - In R. Stuhlmann-Laeisz, Albert Newen & Ulrich Nortmann (eds.), Proceedings of an International Symposium. Stanford, CSLI Publications.
    Putnam (1975) and Burge (1979) have made a convincing case that neither mea- nings nor beliefs are in the head. Most philosophers, it seems, have accepted their argument. Putnam explained that a subject.
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  • Causation, Coherence and Concepts : A Collection of Essays.Wolfgang Spohn - unknown
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  • In Pursuit of Resistance: Pragmatic Recommendations for Doing Science Within One’s Means. [REVIEW]Amy McLaughlin - 2011 - European Journal for Philosophy of Science 1 (3):353-371.
    Charles Peirce’s model of inquiry is supposed to demarcate appropriate methods of inquiry from specious ones. Cheryl Misak points out that Peirce’s explicit account fails, but can nevertheless be rescued by elements of his own system. While Misak’s criticism is a propos, her own attempt to fortify Peirce’s account does not succeed, as it falls prey to the same criticism she raises against Peirce’s explicit account. The account provided in this paper—the ‘open path’ alternative—draws from Peirce’s corollary to his “first (...)
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  • Paul Feyerabend Und Thomas Kuhn.Paul Hoyningen-Huene - 2002 - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 33 (1):61-83.
    The paper discusses some aspects of the relationship between Feyerabend and Kuhn. First, some biographical remarks concerning their connections are made. Second, four characteristics of Feyerabend and Kuhn's concept of incommensurability are discussed. Third, Feyerabend's general criticism of Kuhn's Structure of Scientific Revolutions is reconstructed. Forth and more specifically, Feyerabend's criticism of Kuhn's evaluation of normal science is critically investigated. Finally, Feyerabend's re-evaluation of Kuhn's philosophy towards the end of his life is presented.
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  • El Realismo Normativo de Paul Karl Feyerabend y Su Defensa de la Metafísica.María Teresa Gargiulo - 2015 - Eidos: Revista de Filosofía de la Universidad Del Norte 23:182-212.
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  • Rejection Without Acceptance.Carl A. Matheson & A. David Kline - 1991 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 69 (2):167 – 179.
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  • Towards Objectivism and Relativism.Steve Fuller - 1987 - Social Epistemology 1 (4):351 – 361.
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  • Five Arguments Against Craigian Transcriptionism.C. A. Hooker - 1968 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 46 (3):265 – 276.
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  • On the Historical Origins of the Contemporary Notion of Incommensurability: Paul Feyerabend's Assault on Conceptual Conservatism.Eric Oberheim - 2005 - Studies in the History and Philosophy of Science 36 (2):363-90.
    This paper investigates the historical origins of the notion of incommensurability in contemporary philosophy of science. The aim is not to establish claims of priority, but to enhance our understanding of the notion by illuminating the various issues that contributed to its development. Kuhn developed his notion of incommensurability primarily under the influence of Fleck, Polanyi, and Köhler. Feyerabend, who had developed his notion more than a decade earlier, drew directly from Duhem, who had developed a notion of incommensurability in (...)
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  • The Correspondence Principle and the Closure of Theories.Friedel Weinert - 1994 - Erkenntnis 40 (3):303 - 323.
  • Rediscovering Einstein's Legacy: How Einstein Anticipates Kuhn and Feyerabend on the Nature of Science.Eric Oberheim - 2016 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 57:17-26.
  • Theory Knitting: An Integrative Approach to Theory Development.David A. Kalmar & Robert J. Sternberg - 1988 - Philosophical Psychology 1 (2):153 – 170.
    A close scrutiny of the psychological literature reveals that many psychologists favor a 'segregative' approach to theory development. One theory is pitted against another, and the one that accounts for the data most successfully is deemed the theory of choice. However, an examination of the theoretical debates in which the segregative approach has been pursued reveals a variety of weaknesses to the approach, namely, masking an underlying theoretical indistinguishability of theoretical predictions, causing psychologists to focus unknowingly on different aspects of (...)
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  • Why Evolutionary Epistemology is an Endangered Theory.Brian Baigrie - 1988 - Social Epistemology 2 (4):357 – 369.
  • Book Reviews. [REVIEW]John M. Preston & Alan Soble - 1992 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 6 (2):155-162.
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  • The Anachronistic Anarchist.Elisabeth A. Lloyd - 1996 - Philosophical Studies 81 (2-3):247 - 261.
    A reading of Feyerabend in Against Method, and a comparison of C.S. Peirce.
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  • Dialectic and Diagonalization.John Kadvany - 1991 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 34 (1):3 – 25.
    This essay is about mathematics as a written or literate language. Through historical and anthropological observations drawn from the history of Greek mathematics and the oral tradition preceding the rise of literacy in Greece, as well as considerations on the nature of alphabetic writing, it is argued that three essential linguistic features of mathematical discourse are jointly possible only through written, alphabetic language. The essay concludes with a discussion of how both alphabetic principles and issues related to literacy faced by (...)
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  • Farewell to Feyerabend.Harvey Siegel - 1989 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 32 (3):343 – 369.
    It is with some trepidation that I offer this critical review of Feyerabend's new book. I do not relish the prospect of getting involved in one of the nasty little fights Feyerabend picks with those who criticize his work. Nevertheless, Feyerabend's work cries out for critical attention. Of particular interest is the degree to which this new work deepens or enhances Feyerabend's earlier castigations of Reason. Fans of Feyerabend will be disappointed to learn that Feyerabend's philosophy is not deepened or (...)
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  • Was Feyerabend a Popperian? Methodological Issues in the History of the Philosophy of Science.Matteo Collodel - 2016 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 57:27-56.
  • The Misrepresentation of Science by Philosophers and Teachers of Science.Garth D. Benson - 1989 - Synthese 80 (1):107 - 119.
    In education there is a concern that science teachers misrepresent the nature of science to students. An assumption that is implicit in this concern is that science teachers should be teaching the philosophy of science as it is understood by philosophers. This paper argues that both philosophers and science teachers misrepresent science when they engage in their respective disciplines, and it is evident the two misrepresentations are of different types. In philosophy, the misrepresentation is of a philosophical-epistemological nature where advocates (...)
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