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Science in a Free Society

Philosophical Quarterly 30 (119):172-174 (1978)

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  1. Institutional Logics in the Study of Organizations: The Social Construction of the Relationship Between Corporate Social and Financial Performance.Marc Orlitzky - 2011 - Business Ethics Quarterly 21 (3):409-444.
    This study examines whether the empirical evidence on the relationship between corporate social performance and corporate financial performance differs depending on the publication outlet in which that evidence appears. This moderator meta-analysis, based on a total sample size of 33,878 observations, suggests that published CSP-CFP findings have been shaped by differences in institutional logics in different subdisciplines of organization studies. In economics, finance, and accounting journals, the average correlations were only about half the magnitude of the findings published in Social (...)
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  • Incommensurability (and Incomparability).Ruth Chang - 2013 - In Hugh LaFollette (ed.), The International Encyclopedia of Ethics. Blackwell. pp. 2591-2604.
    This encyclopedia entry urges what it takes to be correctives to common (mis)understandings concerning the phenomenon of incommensurability and incomparability and briefly outlines some of their philosophical upshots.
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  • Methodological Pluralism, Normative Naturalism and the Realist Aim of Science.Howard Sankey - 2000 - In Howard Sankey & Robert Nola (eds.), After Popper, Kuhn and Feyerabend: Recent Issues in Theories of Scientific Method. Dordrecht/Boston/London: Kluwer Academic Publishers. pp. 211-229.
    There are two chief tasks which confront the philosophy of scientific method. The first task is to specify the methodology which serves as the objective ground for scientific theory appraisal and acceptance. The second task is to explain how application of this methodology leads to advance toward the aim(s) of science. In other words, the goal of the theory of method is to provide an integrated explanation of both rational scientific theory choice and scientific progress.
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  • Nature and the Social Sciences: Examples From the Electricity and Waste Sectors.Mikael Klintman - unknown
    The book has two interrelated objectives. One objective is meta-theoretical and concerns the exploration of theoretical debates connected to issues of studying society and environmental problems; another objective is empirical/analytical, referring to the analysis of "green" public participation in the electricity and waste sectors in Sweden, and partly in the Netherlands as well as the UK. The metatheoretical part draws the conclusion that the ontology of critical realism, combined with a problem-subjectivist tenet, is a particularly fruitful basis for the social (...)
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  • What Can the Philosophy of Science Contribute to the Ethics of Science and Technology?Márcio Rojas da Cruz & Gabriele Cornelli - 2016 - Revista Bioética 24 (1):11-21.
    Born to enable its creators to fulfill their needs, scientific technique has always played a significant role in human civilization. This is the context in which we glimpse the advent of modern technoscience, which has significantly contributed to the increment of human control over nature. This study aims to analyze, under the focus of bioethics, reflections on the philosophy of science as they relate to the neutrality of science and converge with epistemic rationality, as well as to relate those reflections (...)
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  • African Philosophy and Postmodern Rationality.Philip Higgs - 2001 - South African Journal of Philosophy 20 (2):215-226.
  • The Sphere of Critical Thinking in a Post-Epistemic World.Steve Fuller - 1994 - Informal Logic 16 (1).
    Just as political theorists have long argued that democracy is viable only in communities of certain sizes and shapes, perhaps epistemologists should also entertain the idea that knowledge is possible only within certain social parameters-ones which today's world may have exceeded. This is what I mean by the "postepistemic" society. I understand an "epistemic society" in Popperian terms as an environment that fosters the spirit of conjectures and refutations. After castigating analytic philosophers for their failure to see this point, I (...)
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  • Complexity and Post-Modernism: Understanding Complex Systems.P. Cilliers & David Spurrett - 1999 - South African Journal of Philosophy 18 (2):258-274.
    This is a review article of Paul Cillier's 1999 book _Complexity and Postmodernism_. The review article is generally encouraging and constructive, although isolates a number of areas in need of clarification or development in Cillier's work. The volume of the _South African Journal of Philosophy_ in which the review article appeared also printed a response by Cilliers.
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  • The Concept of the Monopole. A Historical and Analytical Case-Study.Helge Kragh - 1981 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 12 (2):141.
  • Hindsight and the Definition of Research Success.W. A. Verloren van Themaat - 1984 - Zeitschrift Für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 15 (2):272-277.
    Summary This article compares the discoveries of the planets Neptune and Pluto and the unsuccessful search of intra-Mercurial planets. Its conclusion is, that the search of intra-Mercurial planets was started on the basis of reasonable assumptions and competently pursued, that the success in the search of Neptune and Pluto and the failure in the search of intra-Mercurial planets was not due to greater competence of the successful planet searchers, but to good luck of the successful researchers and bad luck of (...)
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  • Better Red Than Dead—Putting an End to the Social Irrelevance of Postwar Philosophy of Science.Don Howard - 2009 - Science & Education 18 (2):199-220.
  • A Reflection on the Alternative Philosophy of Science.Dachun Liu & Yongmou Liu - 2009 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 4 (4):576-588.
    A prominent phenomenon in contemporary philosophy of science has been the unexpected rise of alternative philosophers of science. This article analyses in depth such alternative philosophers of science as Paul Feyerabend, Richard Rorty, and Michel Foucault, summarizing the similarities and differences between alternative philosophies of science and traditional philosophy of science so as to unveil the trends in contemporary philosophy of science. With its different principles and foundation, alternative philosophy of science has made breakthroughs in terms of its field of (...)
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  • Was Feyerabend a Postmodernist?Ian James Kidd - 2016 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 30 (1):55-68.
    ABSTRACTThis article asks whether the philosophy of Paul K. Feyerabend can be reasonably classified as postmodernist, a label applied to him by friends and foes alike. After describing some superficial similarities between the style and content of both Feyerabend’s and postmodernist writings, I offer three more robust characterisations of postmodernism in terms of relativism, ‘incredulity to metanarratives’, and ‘depthlessness’. It emerges that none of these characterisations offers a strong justification for classifying Feyerabend as ‘postmodern’ in any significant sense. Indeed, what (...)
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  • The Role of the National Science Foundation Broader Impacts Criterion in Enhancing Research Ethics Pedagogy.Seth D. Baum, Michelle Stickler, James S. Shortle, Klaus Keller, Kenneth J. Davis, Donald A. Brown, Erich W. Schienke & Nancy Tuana - 2009 - Social Epistemology 23 (3):317-336.
    The National Science Foundation's Second Merit Criterion, or Broader Impacts Criterion , was introduced in 1997 as the result of an earlier Congressional movement to enhance the accountability and responsibility as well as the effectiveness of federally funded projects. We demonstrate that a robust understanding and appreciation of NSF BIC argues for a broader conception of research ethics in the sciences than is currently offered in Responsible Conduct of Research training. This essay advocates augmenting RCR education with training regarding broader (...)
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  • Continental Philosophy of Science.Babette Babich - 2007 - In Constantin Boundas (ed.), The Edinburgh Companion to the Twentieth Century Philosophies. Edinburgh. University of Edinburgh Press. pp. 545--558.
    Continental philosophies of science tend to exemplify holistic themes connecting order and contingency, questions and answers, writers and readers, speakers and hearers. Such philosophies of science also tend to feature a fundamental emphasis on the historical and cultural situatedness of discourse as significant; relevance of mutual attunement of speaker and hearer; necessity of pre-linguistic cognition based in human engagement with a common socio-cultural historical world; role of narrative and metaphor as explanatory; sustained emphasis on understanding questioning; truth seen as horizonal, (...)
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  • Can Science Investigate the Supernatural? An Investigation Into the Relationship Between Science, the Supernatural and Religion.Jonathan Winthrop - unknown
    Throughout the last century there has been much discussion over what it is that makes an activity or a theory 'scientific'. In the philosophy of science, conversation has focused on differentiating legitimate science from so-called 'pseudoscience'. In the broader cultural sphere this topic has received attention in multiple legal debates regarding the status of creationism, where it has been generally agreed that the 'supernatural' nature of the claims involved renders them unscientific. In this thesis I focus upon the latter of (...)
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  • Paul Feyerabend Und Thomas Kuhn.Paul Hoyningen-Huene - 2002 - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 33 (1):61-83.
    The paper discusses some aspects of the relationship between Feyerabend and Kuhn. First, some biographical remarks concerning their connections are made. Second, four characteristics of Feyerabend and Kuhn's concept of incommensurability are discussed. Third, Feyerabend's general criticism of Kuhn's Structure of Scientific Revolutions is reconstructed. Forth and more specifically, Feyerabend's criticism of Kuhn's evaluation of normal science is critically investigated. Finally, Feyerabend's re-evaluation of Kuhn's philosophy towards the end of his life is presented.
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  • The Rise of Western Rationalism: Paul Feyerabend’s Story.John Preston - 2016 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 57:79-86.
    I summarise certain aspects of Paul Feyerabend’s account of the development of Western rationalism, show the ways in which that account is supposed to run up against an alternative, that of Karl Popper, and then try to give a preliminary comparison of the two. My interest is primarily in whether what Feyerabend called his ‘story’ constitutes a possible history of our epistemic concepts and their trajectory. I express some grave reservations about that story, and about Feyerabend’s framework, finding Popper’s views (...)
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  • Passive Knowledge: How to Make Sense of Kant's A Priori——Or How Not to Be “Too Busily Subsuming”.Constantin Antonopoulos - 2011 - Open Journal of Philosophy 1 (2):39.
    Subjectivists, taking the “collapse” of the observation-interpretation contrast much too seriously, are led to imagine that even perceptual knowledge is active. And therefore subject dependent. Turning the tables on this popular trend, I argue that even conceptual knowledge is passive. Kant’s epistemology is conceptual. But if also active, then incoherent. If synthetic a priori truths are to follow upon our mental activity, they were neither true nor, far less, a priori before that activity. “A priori” and “active” are contradictory attributes (...)
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  • Feyerabend's Scepticism.José R. Maia Neto - 1991 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 22 (4):543-555.
  • Why Did Feyerabend Defend Astrology? Integrity, Virtue, and the Authority of Science.Ian James Kidd - 2016 - Social Epistemology 30 (4):464-482.
    This paper explores the relationship between epistemic integrity, virtue, and authority by offering a virtue epistemological reading of the defences of non-scientific beliefs, practices, and traditions in the writings of Paul Feyerabend. I argue that there was a robust epistemic rationale for those defences and that it can inform contemporary reflection on the epistemic authority of the sciences. Two common explanations of the purpose of those defences are rejected as lacking textual support. A third “pluralist” reading is judged more persuasive, (...)
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  • Reviews : Steve Fuller, Science, Buckingham, UK: Open University Press, and Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota Press, 1997.Val Dusek - 1998 - History of the Human Sciences 11 (2):132-138.
    Fuller's account of religious parallels to scientific and science studies disputes, non-Western science, Merton on values of science.
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  • Brecht and Lukacs as Teachers of Feyerabend and Lakatos: The Feyerabend-Lakatos Debate as Scientific Recapitulation of the Brecht- Lukacs Debate.V. Dusek - 1998 - History of the Human Sciences 11 (2):25-44.
    Feyerabend and Lakatos were invited to be assistants of the literary Marxists Brecht and Lukács, respectively. In the 1930s Expressionism Debate, Lukács associated artistic expressionism with irrationalism and fascism, while Brecht criticized Lukács' anti-modernism. Lakatos' criti cisms of Kuhn echo Lukács' denunciations of German idealism, and Lukács influenced the terminology and topics in Lakatos' methodol ogy. Lakatos, concerned with progress, and fearful of irrationalism and degeneration, recapitulates positions of his teacher, Lukács, in the latter's attack on modern art. Feyerabend's criticisms (...)
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  • Notes on the Cultural Significance of the Sciences.Wallis A. Suchting - 1994 - Science & Education 3 (1):1-56.
  • Sociologie de la Science Et Relativisme.Benjamin Matalon - 1986 - Revue de Synthèse 107 (3):267-290.
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  • Wilson on Relativism and Teaching.Jim Mackenzie - 1987 - Philosophy of Education 21 (1):119-130.
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  • Das Problem der Theorienbewertung.Gerard Radnitzky - 1979 - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 10 (1):67-97.
    O. The idea of scientific progress in contemporary philosophy of science. Explicating the concept of cognitive progress means at the same time articulating an ideal of science. A desirable ideal: explain a lot and offer certainty. 1. Working out the ideal with the "foundationalist-positivist" approach. If the question, "When is it rational to accept a theory?" is answered, "When it has sufficient inductive support," this leads to insoluble problems. Reactions to the collapse of this approach - especially relativism and theory (...)
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  • Science, Worldviews and Education: An Introduction.Michael R. Matthews - 2009 - Science & Education 18 (6-7):641-666.
  • Edward Shils" Theory of Tradition.Jacobs Struan - 2007 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 37 (2):139-162.
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  • Wilson on Relativism and Teaching.Jim Mackenzie - 1987 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 21 (1):119–130.
  • Das Problem der Theorienbewertung.Gerard Radnitzky - 1979 - Zeitschrift Für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 10 (1):67-97.
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  • Science and Pseudo-Science: The Case of Creationism.R. G. A. Dolby - 1987 - Zygon 22 (2):195-212.
  • Hindsight and the Definition of Research Success.W. A. Verloren van Themaat - 1984 - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 15 (2):272-277.
    Summary This article compares the discoveries of the planets Neptune and Pluto and the unsuccessful search of intra-Mercurial planets. Its conclusion is, that the search of intra-Mercurial planets was started on the basis of reasonable assumptions and competently pursued, that the success in the search of Neptune and Pluto and the failure in the search of intra-Mercurial planets was not due to greater competence of the successful planet searchers, but to good luck of the successful researchers and bad luck of (...)
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  • Problematizing Disciplinarity, Transdisciplinary Problematics.P. Osborne - 2015 - Theory, Culture and Society 32 (5-6):3-35.
    This article situates current debates about transdisciplinarity within the deeper history of academic disciplinarity, in its difference from the notions of inter- and multi-disciplinarity. It offers a brief typology and history of established conceptions of transdisciplinarity within science and technology studies. It then goes on to raise the question of the conceptual structure of transdisciplinary generality in the humanities, with respect to the incorporation of the 19th- and 20th-century German and French philosophical traditions into the anglophone humanities, under the name (...)
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