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  1. Business Ethics: The Promise of Neuroscience.Diana C. Robertson, Christian Voegtlin & Thomas Maak - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 144 (4):679-697.
    Recent advances in cognitive neuroscience research portend well for furthering understanding of many of the fundamental questions in the field of business ethics, both normative and empirical. This article provides an overview of neuroscience methodology and brain structures, and explores the areas in which neuroscience research has contributed findings of value to business ethics, as well as suggesting areas for future research. Neuroscience research is especially capable of providing insight into individual reactions to ethical issues, while also raising challenging normative (...)
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  • Is There Neurosexism in Functional Neuroimaging Investigations of Sex Differences?Cordelia Fine - 2013 - Neuroethics 6 (2):369-409.
    The neuroscientific investigation of sex differences has an unsavoury past, in which scientific claims reinforced and legitimated gender roles in ways that were not scientifically justified. Feminist critics have recently argued that the current use of functional neuroimaging technology in sex differences research largely follows that tradition. These charges of ‘neurosexism’ have been countered with arguments that the research being done is informative and valuable and that an over-emphasis on the perils, rather than the promise, of such research threatens to (...)
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  • Sexual Identity and Neurosexism: A Critique of Reductivist Approaches of Sexual Behavior and Gender.Fabrício Pontin, Laura Dick Guerim, Camila Palhares Barbosa & Bruna Fernandes Ternus - 2017 - Dissertatio 45 (S5):22-37.
    This paper will unfold in two different critiques, first dealing with how neuroscience has sexed the brain, ignoring cultural elements of gender formation, and further focusing on the masculine bias of neuroscience research, which, we claim, adopts male physiological and social patterns as “normal”. In order to do so, we will start our investigation with some insights on the sex/gender debate and how it is of consequence for research on neurosciences of sexuality. Secondly, we will critic the way studies are (...)
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  • Neurofeminism and Feminist Neurosciences: A Critical Review of Contemporary Brain Research.Sigrid Schmitz & Grit Hã¶Ppner - 2014 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.
  • Recommendations for Sex/Gender Neuroimaging Research: Key Principles and Implications for Research Design, Analysis, and Interpretation.Gina Rippon, Rebecca Jordan-Young, Anelis Kaiser & Cordelia Fine - 2014 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.
  • Genere.Boris Rähme & Valentina Chizzola - 2017 - Aphex 15:1-38.
    According to a standard interpretation of the term, ‘gender’ denotes sets of social roles and expectations conventionally associated with the sexual physiology of human beings. Originally introduced in psychology, the term is now widely used in the social sciences and humanities, as well as in the biological sciences. In this article we introduce and discuss the central themes of contemporary philosophical debates on gender. Particular attention is paid to recent feminist arguments concerning the distinction between sex and gender, and to (...)
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  • Sex and/or Gender? Some Neuroscientific Approache.Valentina Chizzola - 2012 - Humana Mente 5 (22).
    Traditionally, Gender Studies differentiates between the term “sex”, indicating sex differences from the biological point of view, and the term “gender”, indicating that sex differences are social and cultural constructions. In this paper I discuss some recent neuroscientific theses concerning sexual differences to sketch a path of inquiry that goes beyond the logic of the separation of biological and cultural studies.
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  • Neurosexism and Neurofeminism.Ginger A. Hoffman & Robyn Bluhm - 2016 - Philosophy Compass 11 (11):716-729.
    As neuroscience has gained an increased ability to enchant the general public, it has become more and more common to appeal to it as an authority on a wide variety of questions about how humans do and should act. This is especially apparent with the question of gender roles. The term ‘neurosexism’ has been coined to describe the phenomenon of using neuroscientific practices and results to promote sexist conclusions; its feminist response is called ‘neurofeminism’. Here, our aim is to survey (...)
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