Switch to: References

Citations of:

Inquiry in the Meno

In R. Kraut (ed.), Cambridge Companion to Plato. Cambridge University Press (1992)

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. The Divine Feeling: The Epistemic Function of Erotic Desire in Plato’s Theory of Recollection.Laura Candiotto - 2020 - Philosophia 48 (2):445-462.
    In the so-called “erotic dialogues”, especially the Symposium and the Phaedrus, Plato explained why erotic desire can play an epistemic function, establishing a strong connection between erotic desire and beauty, “the most clearly visible and the most loved” among the Ideas. Taking the erotic dialogues as a background, in this paper I elucidate Plato’s explanation in another context, the one of the Phaedo, for discussing the epistemic function of erotic desire in relation to the deficiency argument and the affinity argument. (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • A New Philosophical Tool in the Meno: 86e-87c.David Ebrey - 2013 - Ancient Philosophy 33 (1):75-96.
    I argue that the technique Socrates describes in the Meno at 86e-87c allows him to make progress without definitions, even while accepting that definitions are necessary for knowledge. Some contend that the technique involves provisionally accepting a claim. I argue, instead, that it provides a secure biconditional that one can use to reduce the question one cares care about to a new question that one thinks will be easier to answer.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Límite de la Téchne y Virtud Del Diálogo Según Platón.Cristián De Bravo Delorme - 2019 - Trans/Form/Ação 42 (4):9-28.
    Resumen: El siguiente artículo parte reconociendo el carácter protector de la téchne y sus momentos constitutivos. De acuerdo a esta determinación es posible advertir el límite de la téchne a partir de la cuestión socrática de la virtud. La virtud, en la medida que no es un asunto análogo a los objetos de la téchne, precisa de un especial acceso. Desde la constatación del diálogo como el único modo de conocer la virtud, se pone de relieve su sentido comunitario y (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Soul, Triangle and Virtue. On the Figure of Implicit Comparison in Plato’s Meno.Lidia Palumbo - 2017 - Peitho 8 (1):201-212.
    Plato’s dialogues can be regarded as the most important documents of the extraordinary mimetic power of visual writing, i.e., writing capable of “showing” and “drawing images” by using words only. Thanks to the great lesson of the Attic theater, Plato makes his readers see: when reading the dialogues, they see not only the characters talking but owing to the visual power of mimetic writing, they also see that which the characters are actually talking about. There are numerous rhetorical devices employed (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Is Plato an Innatist in the Meno?David Bronstein & Whitney Schwab - 2019 - Phronesis 64 (4):392-430.
    Plato in the Meno is standardly interpreted as committed to condition innatism: human beings are born with latent innate states of knowledge. Against this view, Gail Fine has argued for prenatalism: human souls possess knowledge in a disembodied state but lose it upon being embodied. We argue against both views and in favor of content innatism: human beings are born with innate cognitive contents that can be, but do not exist innately in the soul as, the contents of states of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Plato and the Norms of Thought.R. Woolf - 2013 - Mind 122 (485):171-216.
    This paper argues for the presence in Plato’s work of a conception of thinking central to which is what I call the Transparency View. According to this view, in order for a subject to think of a given object, the subject must represent that object just as it is, without inaccuracy or distortion. I examine the ways in which this conception influences Plato’s epistemology and metaphysics and explore some ramifications for contemporary views about mental content.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Conocimiento, descubrimiento Y reminiscencia en el menón de platón.Alejandro Farieta - 2013 - Universitas Philosophica 30 (60):205-234.
    This work articulates two thesis: one Socratic and one Platonic; and displays how the first one is heir of the second. The Socratic one is called the principle of priority of definition; the Platonic one is the Recollection theory. The articulation between both theses is possible due to the Meno’s paradox, which makes a criticism on the first thesis, but it is solved with the second one. The consequence of this articulation is a new interpretation of the Recollection theory, as (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Knowledge, Discovery and Reminiscence in Plato's Meno.Alejandro Farieta - 2013 - Universitas Philosophica 30 (60):205-234.
    This work articulates two thesis: one Socratic and one Platonic; and displays how the first one is heir of the second. The Socratic one is called the principle of priority of definition; the Platonic one is the Recollection theory. The articulation between both theses is possible due to the Meno’s paradox, which makes a criticism on the first thesis, but it is solved with the second one. The consequence of this articulation is a new interpretation of the Recollection theory, as (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Two Aspects of Platonic Recollection.Thomas Williams - 2002 - Apeiron 35 (2):131 - 152.
    Notwithstanding considerable disagreement over certain details, writers on Plato’s theory of recollection are broadly in agreement regarding some of the main features. Setting aside for the moment those who doubt that Plato ever held any considered doctrine so well‐developed as to constitute a theory of recollection at all, we can find a substantial scholarly consensus in favor of the following account: In the Phaedo Plato argues that all human beings recollect the Forms. Such recollection is meant to account for the (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Elenchus, Recollection, and the Method of Hypothesis in the Meno.Cristina Ionescu - 2017 - Plato Journal: The Journal of the International Plato Society 17:9-29.
    The Meno is often interpreted as an illustration of Plato’s decision to replace elenchus with recollection and the method of hypothesis. My paper challenges this view and defends instead two theses: that far from replacing elenchus, the method of hypothesis incorporates and uses elenctic arguments in order to test and build its own steps; and that recollection is not a method of search on a par with elenchus and the method of hypothesis, but is rather primarily a theory that accounts (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Signification, Essence, and Meno’s Paradox: A Reply to David Charles’s ‘Types of Definition in the Meno’.Gail Fine - 2010 - Phronesis 55 (2):125-152.
  • Colloquium 5: Is Virtue Knowledge? Socratic Intellectualism Reconsidered1.Jörg Hardy - 2010 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 25 (1):149-191.
  • Fine/Sharma Bibliography.Editors Proceedings of the Boston Ar - 2013 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 28 (1):158-159.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Colloquium 4: The Method of Hypothesis in the Meno.Hugh Benson - 2003 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 18 (1):95-143.
  • Plato on Education and Art.Rachana Kamtekar - 2008 - In Gail Fine (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Plato. Oxford University Press. pp. 336--359.
    The article resonates Plato's ideas on education and art. In the Apology, Socrates describes his life's mission of practicing philosophy as aimed at getting the Athenians to care for virtue; in the Gorgias, Plato claims that happiness depends entirely on education and justice; in the Protagoras and the Meno, he puzzles about whether virtue is teachable or how else it might be acquired; in the Phaedrus, he explains that teaching and persuading require knowledge of the soul and its powers, which (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Commentary on Gentzler 1.Predrag Cicovacki - 1994 - Proceedings of the Boston Area Colloquium of Ancient Philosophy 10 (1):296-311.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Unexamined Student is Not Worth Teaching: Preparation, the Zone of Proximal Development, and the Socratic Model of Scaffolded Learning.Robert Colter & Joseph Ulatowski - 2017 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 49 (14):1367-1380.
    ‘Scaffolded learning’ describes a cluster of instructional techniques designed to move students from a novice position toward greater understanding, such that they become independent learners. Our Socratic Model of Scaffolded Learning includes two phases not normally included in discussions of scaffolded learning, the preparatory and problematizing phases. Our article will illuminate this blind spot by arguing that these crucial preliminary elements ought to be considered an integral part of a scaffolding model. If instructors are cognizant of the starting position of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Signification, Essence, and Meno's Paradox: A Reply to David Charles's 'Types of Definition in the Meno'.Gail Fine - 2010 - Phronesis 55 (2):125-152.
    According to David Charles, in the Meno Socrates fleetingly distinguishes the signification from the essence question, but, in the end, he conflates them. Doing so, Charles thinks, both leads to Meno's paradox and prevents Socrates from answering it satisfactorily. I argue that Socrates doesn't conflate the two questions, and that his reply to Meno's paradox is more satisfactory than Charles allows.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • How Can One Search for God?: The Paradox of Inquiry in Augustine's Confessions.Scott Macdonald - 2008 - Metaphilosophy 39 (1):20–38.
    The Confessions recounts Augustine 's successful search for God. But Augustine worries that one cannot search for God if one does not already know God. That version of the paradox of inquiry dominates and structures Confessions 1–10. I draw connections between the dramatic opening lines of book 1 and the climactic discussion in book 10.26–38 and argue that the latter discussion contains Augustine 's resolution of the paradox of inquiry as it applies to the special case of searching for God. (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • XII-Escaping One's Own Notice Knowing: Meno's Paradox Again.Mary Margaret McCabe - 2009 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 109 (1pt3):233-256.
  • Meno's Paradox in Context.David Ebrey - 2014 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 22 (1):4-24.
    I argue that Meno’s Paradox targets the type of knowledge that Socrates has been looking for earlier in the dialogue: knowledge grounded in explanatory definitions. Socrates places strict requirements on definitions and thinks we need these definitions to acquire knowledge. Meno’s challenge uses Socrates’ constraints to argue that we can neither propose definitions nor recognize them. To understand Socrates’ response to the challenge, we need to view Meno’s challenge and Socrates’ response as part of a larger disagreement about the value (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Methodology in Socrates' Examination of the Slave.Chad Wiener - 2011 - Dialogue 50 (3):443-467.
    ABSTRACT: I argue that Socrates employs both elenchus and the method of hypothesis in the examination of the slave. I show that the elenchus is a necessary step of the inquiry. Being reduced to ignorance, Socrates tacitly uses the method of hypothesis to move the slave from ignorance to correct opinion. I tease this out from the questions Socrates asks. Although the method of hypothesis begins from a question distinct from elenchus, the solution to the problem leads the slave to (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Reconsideration of the Paradox of Inquiry.Kunimasa Sato - 2014 - Science & Education 23 (5):987-995.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Escaping One's Own Notice Knowing: Meno's Paradox Again.Mary Margaret McCabe - 2009 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 109 (1pt3):233 - 256.
    The complex way Meno's paradox is presented in the Meno forces reflection on both the external conditions on inquiry—its objects—and its internal conditions—the state of mind of the person who inquires. The theory of recollection does not fully account for the internal conditions—as Plato makes clear in the critique of Meno's puzzle to be found in the Euthydemus. I conclude that in the Euthydemus Plato is inviting us to reject the externalist account of knowledge urged on Socrates by the sophists (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations