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  1. Disregarding Religion in Social Psychology: The Case of the The Handbook of Social Psychology.Michael J. Donahue - 2005 - Archive for the Psychology of Religion 27 (1):45-68.
    In spite of a burgeoning literature demonstrating the importance of religiousness as a determinant of a wide range of behaviors, social psychology continues to ignore this important construct. This article begins with the current spate of interest in religion in virtually the entire field of psychology, and then goes on to present a cursory history of the recent psychology of religion. Attention then turns to the most recent edition of The Handbook of Social Psychology, noting that the concept of religion (...)
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  • Implicit Social Cognition: Attitudes, Self-Esteem, and Stereotypes.Anthony G. Greenwald & Mahzarin R. Banaji - 1995 - Psychological Review 102 (1):4-27.
  • Pursuing Goals with Others: Group Identification and Motivation Resulting From Things Done Versus Things Left Undone.Ayelet Fishbach, Marlone D. Henderson & Minjung Koo - 2011 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 140 (3):520-534.
  • Implicit Association Test: Validity Debates.Anthony Greenwald - manuscript
    Note posted 9 Jun 08 : Modifications made today include a new section on predictive validity, and addition of recently published article and in in-press article, both by Nosek & Hansen, under the "CULTURE VS. PERSON" heading, which replaces a previously listed unpublished ms. of theirs. I continue to encourage all interested to send material that they are willing to be included on this page. Please also to let me know about errors, including faulty links.
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  • Determinants of Consumer’s Willingness to Purchase Gray-Market Smartphones.Chun-Hsiung Liao & I. -Yu Hsieh - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 114 (3):409-424.
    The study analyzes the influential factors of consumers’ willingness to purchase gray-market smartphones by considering the model of novelty seeking, status consumption, integrity, and perceived risk. Attitude toward counterfeit is used as mediation in the model. The causalities in the model of problematic willingness of consumer to purchase gray-market smartphones are hypothesized. A total sample of 350 respondents with 238 effective samples is collected by interviewing with questionnaires at the service counters of telecommunications operators. Structure equation modeling (SEM) is adopted (...)
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  • Religiosity, CSR Attitudes, and CSR Behavior: An Empirical Study of Executives’ Religiosity and CSR.Corrie Mazereeuw-van der Duijn Schouten, Johan Graafland & Muel Kaptein - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 123 (3):437-459.
    In this paper, we examine the relationship between Christian religiosity, attitudes towards corporate social responsibility, and CSR behavior of executives. We distinguish four types of CSR attitudes and five types of CSR behavior. Based on empirical research conducted among 473 Dutch executives, we find that CSR attitudes mediate the influence of religiosity on CSR behavior. Intrinsic religiosity positively affects the ethical CSR attitude and negatively affects the financial CSR attitude, whereas extrinsic religiosity stimulates the philanthropic CSR attitude. Financial, ethical, and (...)
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  • Effects of Mobile Text Advertising on Consumer Purchase Intention: A Moderated Mediation Analysis.Lin Hongyan & Chen Zhankui - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
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  • Explanatory Limitations of Cognitive-Developmental Approaches to Morality.Dennis L. Krebs & Kathy Denton - 2006 - Psychological Review 113 (3):672-675.
  • Program to Promote Personal and Social Responsibility in the Secondary Classroom.Miguel A. Carbonero, Luis J. Martín-Antón, Lourdes Otero & Eugenio Monsalvo - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
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  • What Cognitive Representations Underlie Social Attitudes?Anthony G. Greenwald - 1990 - Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 28 (3):254-260.
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  • Individual Differences in Workplace Deviance and Integrity as Predictors of Academic Dishonesty.Gale M. Lucas & James Friedrich - 2005 - Ethics and Behavior 15 (1):15 – 35.
    Meta-analytic findings have suggested that individual differences are relatively weaker predictors of academic dishonesty than are situational factors. A robust literature on deviance correlates and workplace integrity testing, however, demonstrates that individual difference variables can be relatively strong predictors of a range of counterproductive work behaviors (CWBs). To the extent that academic cheating represents a kind of counterproductive behavior in the work role of "student", employment-type integrity measures should be strong predictors of academic dishonesty. Our results with a college student (...)
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  • Predictive Validity of the Implicit Association Test in Studies of Brands, Consumer Attitudes, and Behavior.D. Maison, Anthony G. Greenwald & R. H. Bruin - 2004 - Journal of Consumer Psychology 14:405-415.
    Three studies investigated implicit brand attitudes and their relation to explicit attitudes, prod- uct usage, and product differentiation. Implicit attitudes were measured using the Implicit As- sociation Test (IAT; Greenwald, McGhee, & Schwartz, 1998). Study 1 showed expected differ- ences in implicit attitudes between users of two leading yogurt brands, also revealing significant correlations between IAT-measured implicit attitudes and explicit attitudes. In Study 2, users of two fast food restaurants (McDonald’s and Milk Bar) showed implicit attitudi- nal preference for their (...)
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