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  1. The Aeschylean Sting in Wasps’ Tale: Aristophanes’ Engagement with the Oresteia.Rosie Wyles - forthcoming - Classical Quarterly:1-12.
    The sting to Aristophanes’ ‘little tale’ in Wasps materializes from the comedy's interplay with the Oresteia. This article argues that Aristophanes alludes to both Agamemnon and Eumenides in the scenes running up to the trial scene, and that he exploits this intertext in the cloak scene. While isolated allusions to the Oresteia have been identified in Wasps, a systematic consideration of these references has not been undertaken: a surprising absence in discussions of the ongoing competition between the comic and the (...)
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  • La tiranía del disfraz: algunas consideraciones en torno al papel de la vestimenta en la Comedia Griega Antigua.Claudia N. Fernández - 2010 - Synthesis (la Plata) 17:81-97.
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  • Poets and Poetry in Later Greek Comedy.Matthew Wright - 2013 - Classical Quarterly 63 (2):603-622.
    The comic dramatists of the fifth centuryb.c.were notable for their preoccupation with poetics – that is, their frequent references to their own poetry and that of others, their overt interest in the Athenian dramatic festivals and their adjudication, their penchant for parody and pastiche, and their habit of self-conscious reflection on the nature of good and bad poetry. I have already explored these matters at some length, in my study of the relationship between comedy and literary criticism in the period (...)
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  • Dicaepolis' Motivation in Aristophanes' "Acharnians".S. Douglas Olson - 1991 - Journal of Hellenic Studies 111:200-203.
  • The Five Talents Cleon Coughed Up.Edwin M. Carawan - 1990 - Classical Quarterly 40 (1):137-147.
    In the opening lines of Aristophanes' Acharnians, Dicaeopolis counts first among his greatest joys ‘the five talents Cleon coughed up’, and he professes his love of the Knights for this service ‘worthy of Hellas’. The ancient scholiast gave what he thought an obvious explanation from Theopompus : he tells us that Cleon was accused of taking bribes to lighten the tribute of the islanders, and he was then fined ‘because of the outrage against the Knights’. Evidently Theopompus connected the charges (...)
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