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  1. HR Fables: Schizophrenia, Selling Your Soul in Dystopia, Fuck the Employees, and Sleepless Nights.Ian Steers - 2008 - Business Ethics 17 (4):391-404.
    Aesop's fables are used to gather HR fables and these fables are told mainly in the words of the protagonists of these moral stories, HR practitioners. Leaving the moral meaning of the fables for the reader to interpret so the reader can ethically connect with the morality of HR work, the personal narratives of practitioners and their humanity, the fables conclude with a critical commentary by the author, the promotion of a human virtue and HR moral maxim. The article, itself, (...)
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  • HR Fables: Schizophrenia, Selling Your Soul in Dystopia, Fuck the Employees, and Sleepless Nights.Ian Steers - 2008 - Business Ethics: A European Review 17 (4):391-404.
  • Graduate Employability and the Principle of Potentiality: An Aspect of the Ethics of HRM. [REVIEW]Bogdan Costea, Kostas Amiridis & Norman Crump - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 111 (1):25-36.
    The recruitment of the next generation of workers is of central concern to contemporary HRM. This paper focuses on university campuses as a major site of this process, and particularly as a new domain in which HRM's ethical claims are configured, in which it sets and answers a range of ethical questions as it outlines the 'ethos' of the ideal future worker. At the heart of this ethos lies what we call the 'principle of potentiality'. This principle is explored through (...)
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  • HR Fables: Schizophrenia, Selling Your Soul in Dystopia, Fuck the Employees, and Sleepless Nights.Ian Steers - 2008 - Business Ethics 17 (4):391-404.
    Aesop's fables are used to gather HR fables and these fables are told mainly in the words of the protagonists of these moral stories, HR practitioners. Leaving the moral meaning of the fables for the reader to interpret so the reader can ethically connect with the morality of HR work, the personal narratives of practitioners and their humanity, the fables conclude with a critical commentary by the author, the promotion of a human virtue and HR moral maxim. The article, itself, (...)
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  • Corporate Social Responsibility and the Social Enterprise.Nelarine Cornelius, Mathew Todres, Shaheena Janjuha-Jivraj, Adrian Woods & James Wallace - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 81 (2):355-370.
    In this article, we contend that due to their size and emphasis upon addressing external social concerns, the corporate relationship between social enterprises, social awareness and action is more complex than whether or not these organisations engage in corporate social responsibility (CSR). This includes organisations that place less emphasis on CSR as well as other organisations that may be very proficient in CSR initiatives, but are less successful in recording practices. In this context, we identify a number of internal CSR (...)
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  • From Caring Entrepreneur to Caring Enterprise: Addressing the Ethical Challenges of Scaling Up Social Enterprises.Kevin André & Anne-Claire Pache - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 133 (4):659-675.
    This paper advances the conception of social entrepreneurs as caring entrepreneurs. We argue that the care ethics of social entrepreneurs, implying the pursuit of caring goals through caring processes, can be challenged when they engage in the process of scaling up their ventures. We propose that social entrepreneurs can sustain their care ethics as the essential dimension of their venture only if they are able to build a caring enterprise. Organizational care designates the set of organizing principles that facilitate the (...)
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  • The Impact of Ethical Tools on Aggressiveness in Financial Reporting.Brian M. Nagle, David M. Wasieleski & Stephen Rau - 2012 - Business and Society Review 117 (4):477-513.
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