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  1. Does Prestige Affect Us Physiologically?Laurent Cordonier, Audrey Breton, Emmanuel Trouche & Jean-Baptiste Van der Henst - 2017 - Interaction Studies 18 (2):214-233.
    Past research dedicated to the impact of hierarchy on the autonomic nervous system has focused mainly on dominance. The current study extends this investigation by assessing the effect of social prestige, operationalized through occupational status, and examines whether people react differently when interacting with individuals of high or low occupational status. Participants’ heart rate and electrodermal activity were recorded while they interacted with a confederate who was introduced either as a neurosurgeon or as a nurse aide. The results show that, (...)
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  • The Role of Eye Gaze in Regulating Turn Taking in Conversations: A Systematized Review of Methods and Findings.Ziedune Degutyte & Arlene Astell - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
    Eye gaze plays an important role in communication but understanding of its actual function or functions and the methods used to elucidate this have varied considerably. This systematized review was undertaken to summarize both the proposed functions of eye gaze in conversations of healthy adults and the methodological approaches employed. The eligibility criteria were restricted to a healthy adult population and excluded studies that manipulated eye gaze behavior. A total of 29 articles—quantitative, qualitative and mixed methods were returned, with a (...)
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  • Sympathy for the Underdog: People Are Inclined to Adopt the Emotional Perspective of Powerless (Versus Powerful) Others.François Quesque, Alexandre Foncelle, Elodie Barat, Eric Chabanat, Yves Rossetti & Jean-Baptiste Van der Henst - forthcoming - Cognition and Emotion:1-16.
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  • Developmental Changes in Attention to Faces and Bodies in Static and Dynamic Scenes.Brenda M. Stoesz & Lorna S. Jakobson - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
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  • Socially Communicative Eye Contact and Gender Affect Memory.Sophie N. Lanthier, Michelle Jarick, Mona J. H. Zhu, Crystal S. J. Byun & Alan Kingstone - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
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  • The Duality of Gaze: Eyes Extract and Signal Social Information During Sustained Cooperative and Competitive Dyadic Gaze.Michelle Jarick & Alan Kingstone - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
  • Implicit Perceptions of Closeness From the Direct Eye Gaze.Mengmeng Cui, Minghao Zhu, Xiaomin Lu & Lei Zhu - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  • Turning Away From Averted Gazes: The Effect of Social Exclusion on Gaze Cueing.Roberta Capellini, Paolo Riva, Paola Ricciardelli & Simona Sacchi - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
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  • Social Beliefs and Visual Attention: How the Social Relevance of a Cue Influences Spatial Orienting.Matthias S. Gobel, Miles R. A. Tufft & Daniel C. Richardson - 2018 - Cognitive Science 42 (S1):161-185.
    We are highly tuned to each other's visual attention. Perceiving the eye or hand movements of another person can influence the timing of a saccade or the reach of our own. However, the explanation for such spatial orienting in interpersonal contexts remains disputed. Is it due to the social appearance of the cue—a hand or an eye—or due to its social relevance—a cue that is connected to another person with attentional and intentional states? We developed an interpersonal version of the (...)
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  • How the Eyes Tell Lies: Social Gaze During a Preference Task.Tom Foulsham & Maria Lock - 2015 - Cognitive Science 39 (7):1704-1726.
    Social attention is thought to require detecting the eyes of others and following their gaze. To be effective, observers must also be able to infer the person's thoughts and feelings about what he or she is looking at, but this has only rarely been investigated in laboratory studies. In this study, participants' eye movements were recorded while they chose which of four patterns they preferred. New observers were subsequently able to reliably guess the preference response by watching a replay of (...)
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  • The Dual Function of Social Gaze.Matthias S. Gobel, Heejung S. Kim & Daniel C. Richardson - 2015 - Cognition 136:359-364.
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  • Characterization of Face-Selective Patches in Orbitofrontal Cortex.Vanessa Troiani, Chase C. Dougherty, Andrew M. Michael & Ingrid R. Olson - 2016 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 10.
  • Involuntary Processing of Social Dominance Cues From Bimodal Face-Voice Displays.Virginie Peschard, Pierre Philippot & Eva Gilboa-Schechtman - 2018 - Cognition and Emotion 32 (1):1-11.
    Social-rank cues communicate social status or social power within and between groups. Information about social-rank is fluently processed in both visual and auditory modalities. So far, the investigation on the processing of social-rank cues has been limited to studies in which information from a single modality was assessed or manipulated. Yet, in everyday communication, multiple information channels are used to express and understand social-rank. We sought to examine the voluntary nature of processing of facial and vocal signals of social-rank using (...)
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  • Do Social Utility Judgments Influence Attentional Processing?Danielle M. Shore & Erin A. Heerey - 2013 - Cognition 129 (1):114-122.
  • A Cross-Cultural Study of Noblesse Oblige in Economic Decision-Making.Laurence Fiddick, Denise Dellarosa Cummins, Maria Janicki, Sean Lee & Nicole Erlich - 2013 - Human Nature 24 (3):318-335.
    A cornerstone of economic theory is that rational agents are self-interested, yet a decade of research in experimental economics has shown that economic decisions are frequently driven by concerns for fairness, equity, and reciprocity. One aspect of other-regarding behavior that has garnered attention is noblesse oblige, a social norm that obligates those of higher status to be generous in their dealings with those of lower status. The results of a cross-cultural study are reported in which marked noblesse oblige was observed (...)
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