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  1. Critique of Imperial Reason: Lessons From the Zhuangzi.Dorothy H. B. Kwek - forthcoming - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy:1-23.
    It has often been said that the Zhuangzi 莊子 advocates political abstention, and that its putative skepticism prevents it from contributing in any meaningful way to political thinking: at best the Zhuangzi espouses a sort of anarchism, at worst it is “the night in which all cows are black,” a stance that one scholar has charged is ultimately immoral. This article tracks possible political allusions within the text, and, by reading these against details of social, political, and historical context, sheds (...)
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  • Can a Daoist Sage Have Close Relationships with Other Human Beings?Joanna Iwanowska - 2017 - Diametros 52:23-46.
    This paper explores the compatibility between the Daoist art of emptying one’s heart-mind and the art of creating close relationships. The fact that a Daoist sage is characterized by an empty heart-mind makes him somewhat different from an average human being: since a full heart-mind is characteristic of the human condition, the sage transcends what makes us human. This could alienate him from others and make him incapable of developing close relationships. The research goal of this paper is to investigate (...)
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  • Optimal Experience and Optimal Identity: A Multinational Study of the Associations Between Flow and Social Identity.Yanhui Mao, Scott Roberts, Stefano Pagliaro, Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi & Marino Bonaiuto - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
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  • Beyond Sincerity and Pretense: Role-Playing and Unstructured Self in the Zhuangzi.David Machek - 2016 - Asian Philosophy 26 (1):52-65.
    ABSTRACTThis article engages with a recent view that the Daoist Classic Zhuangzi advances an alternative to the Confucian role-ethics. According to this view, Zhuangzi opposes the Confucian idea that we should play our social roles with sincerity and instead argues that we should take the liberty to detach ourselves from the roles we play and ‘pretend’ them. It is argued in this article that Zhuangzi’s ideal of role-playing is based neither on sincerity nor on pretense. Instead, it is akin to (...)
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  • Emotion and Agency in Zhuāngz.Chris Fraser - 2011 - Asian Philosophy 21 (1):97-121.
    Among the many striking features of the philosophy of the Zhu?ngz? is that it advocates a life unperturbed by emotions, including even pleasurable, positive emotions such as joy or delight. Many of us see emotions as an ineluctable part of life, and some would argue they are a crucial component of a well-developed moral sensitivity and a good life. The Zhuangist approach to emotion challenges such commonsense views so radically that it amounts to a test case for the fundamental plausibility (...)
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  • Bibliografía seleccionada y comentada sobre Taoísmo Clásico : Obras generales y Zhuāng zǐ.Javier Bustamante Donas & Juan Luis Varona - 2015 - 'Ilu. Revista de Ciencias de Las Religiones 20:269-311.
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  • A Theory of Interpretation for Comparative and Chinese Philosophy.Lin Ma & Jaap van Brakel - 2016 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 15 (4):575-589.
    Why should interpretation of conceptual schemes and practices across traditions work at all? In this paper we present the following necessary conditions of possibility for interpretation in comparative and Chinese philosophy: the interpreter must presuppose that there are mutually recognizable human practices; the interpreter must presuppose that “the other” is, on the whole, sincere, consistent, and right; the interpreter must be committed to certain epistemic virtues. Some of these necessary conditions are consistent with the fact that interpretation is not thwarted (...)
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