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  1. Scientists’ Understandings of Risk of Nanomaterials: Disciplinary Culture Through the Ethnographic Lens.Mikael Johansson & Åsa Boholm - 2017 - NanoEthics 11 (3):229-242.
    There is a growing literature on how scientific experts understand risk of technology related to their disciplinary field. Previous research shows that experts have different understandings and perspectives depending on disciplinary culture, organizational affiliation, and how they more broadly look upon their role in society. From a practice-based perspective on risk management as a bottom-up activity embedded in work place routines and everyday interactions, we look, through an ethnographic lens, at the laboratory life of nanoscientists. In the USA and Sweden, (...)
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  • Informed Consent in Asymmetrical Relationships: An Investigation Into Relational Factors That Influence Room for Reflection.Shannon Lydia Spruit, Ibo Poel & Neelke Doorn - 2016 - NanoEthics 10 (2):123-138.
    In recent years, informed consent has been suggested as a way to deal with risks posed by engineered nanomaterials. We argue that while we can learn from experiences with informed consent in treatment and research contexts, we should be aware that informed consent traditionally pertains to certain features of the relationships between doctors and patients and researchers and research participants, rather than those between producers and consumers and employers and employees, which are more prominent in the case of engineered nanomaterials. (...)
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  • Blueprint for the Development and Sustainability of National Nanosafety Centers.Neeraj Shandilya, Effie Marcoulaki, Sven Vercauteren, Hilda Witters, Eric Johansson Salazar-Sandoval, Anna-Kaisa Viitanen, Christophe Bressot & Wouter Fransman - 2020 - NanoEthics 14 (2):169-183.
    This work presents a blueprint or set of guidelines for the planning and development of sustainable national centers dealing with the safety of nanomaterials and nanotechnologies toward public health and environment. The blueprint was developed following a methodological approach of EU-wide online survey and workshop with several stakeholders. The purpose was to identify the key elements and challenges in the development and sustainability of a national nanosafety center. The responses were received from representatives of 16 national nanosafety centers across Europe (...)
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  • Informed Consent in Asymmetrical Relationships: An Investigation Into Relational Factors That Influence Room for Reflection.Shannon Lydia Spruit, Ibo van de Poel & Neelke Doorn - 2016 - NanoEthics 10 (2):123-138.
    In recent years, informed consent has been suggested as a way to deal with risks posed by engineered nanomaterials. We argue that while we can learn from experiences with informed consent in treatment and research contexts, we should be aware that informed consent traditionally pertains to certain features of the relationships between doctors and patients and researchers and research participants, rather than those between producers and consumers and employers and employees, which are more prominent in the case of engineered nanomaterials. (...)
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