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  1. Business Ethics: A Synthesis of Normative Philosophy and Empirical Social Science.Carroll Underwood Stephens - 1994 - Business Ethics Quarterly 4 (2):145-155.
    A synthesis of the two theoretical bases of business ethics-normative philosophy and descriptive social science-is called for. Examples from the literature are used to demonstrate that to ignore the descriptive aspects of moral behavior is to risk unreal philosophy, and that to ignore the normative aspects is to risk amoral social science. Business ethics is portrayed as a single unified field, in which fact-value distinctions are inappropriate.
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  • Voluntary Codes of Conduct for Multinational Corporations: Coordinating Duties of Rescue and Justice.Nien-hê Hsieh - 2006 - Business Ethics Quarterly 16 (2):119-135.
    This paper examines the extent to which the voluntary adoption of codes of conduct by multinational corporations rendersMNCs accountable for the performance of actions specified in a code of conduct. In particular, the paper examines the ways in which codes of conduct coordinate the expectations of relevant parties with regard to the provision of assistance by MNCs on grounds of rescue or justice. The paper argues that this coordinative role of codes of conduct renders MNCs more accountable for the performance (...)
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  • Debunking Corporate Moral Responsibility.Manuel Velasquez - 2003 - Business Ethics Quarterly 13 (4):531-562.
    I address three topics. First, I argue that the issue of corporate moral responsibility is an important one for business ethics.Second, I examine a core argument for the claim that the corporate organization is a separate moral agent and show it is based on anunnoticed but elementary mistake deriving from the fallacy of division. Third, I examine the assumptions collectivists make about whatit means to say that organizations act and that they act intentionally and show that these assumptions are mistaken (...)
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  • Toward an Intermediate Position on Corporate Moral Personhood.Kevin Gibson - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 101 (S1):71-81.
    Models of moral responsibility rely on foundational views about moral agency. Many scholars believe that only humans can be moral agents, and therefore business needs to create models that foster greater receptivity to others through ethical dialog. This view leads to a difficulty if no specific person is the sole causal agent for an act, or if something comes about through aggregated action in a corporate setting. An alternate approach suggests that corporations are moral agents sufficiently like humans to be (...)
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  • Voluntary Codes of Conduct for Multinational Corporations: Coordinating Duties of Rescue and Justice.Nien-hê Hsieh - 2006 - Business Ethics Quarterly 16 (2):119-136.
    Abstract: This paper examines the extent to which the voluntary adoption of codes of conduct by multinational corporations (MNCs) renders MNCs accountable for the performance of actions specified in a code of conduct. In particular, the paper examines the ways in which codes of conduct coordinate the expectations of relevant parties with regard to the provision of assistance by MNCs on grounds of rescue or justice. The paper argues that this coordinative role of codes of conduct renders MNCs more accountable (...)
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  • Voluntary Codes of Conduct for Multinational Corporations: Coordinating Duties of Rescue and Justice.Nien-hê Hsieh - 2006 - Business Ethics Quarterly 16 (2):119-135.
    This paper examines the extent to which the voluntary adoption of codes of conduct by multinational corporations rendersMNCs accountable for the performance of actions specified in a code of conduct. In particular, the paper examines the ways in which codes of conduct coordinate the expectations of relevant parties with regard to the provision of assistance by MNCs on grounds of rescue or justice. The paper argues that this coordinative role of codes of conduct renders MNCs more accountable for the performance (...)
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