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  1. Will the "Secular Priests" of Bioethics Work Among the Sinners?Chris MacDonald - 2003 - American Journal of Bioethics 3 (2):36-39.
    In this paper, I explore briefly the "secular priesthood" metaphor often applied to bioethicists. I next ask: if, despite our discomfort with the metaphor, we were to embrace the best aspects of the priesthood(s) ? which I identify as the missionaries' willingness to work among sinners and lepers, at their own peril ? would we be able to live up to that standard of bravery? I then draw a parallel with the fears of contagion currently be voiced (by Carl Elliott (...)
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  • The Olivieri Debacle: Where Were the Heroes of Bioethics?F. Baylis - 2004 - Journal of Medical Ethics 30 (1):44-49.
    All Canadian bioethicists need to reflect on the meaning and value of their work, to see more clearly how the ethics of bioethics is being undermined from within. In the case involving Dr Olivieri, the Hospital for Sick Children, the University of Toronto, and Apotex Inc, there were countless opportunities for bioethical heroism. And yet, no bioethics heroes emerged from this case. Much has been written about the hospital’s and the university’s failures in this case. But what about the deafening (...)
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  • Bioethics as a Second-Order Discipline: Who is Not a Bioethicist?Loretta Kopelman - 2006 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 31 (6):601 – 628.
    A dispute exists about whether bioethics should become a new discipline with its own methods, competency standards, duties, honored texts, and core curriculum. Unique expertise is a necessary condition for disciplines. Using the current literature, different views about the sort of expertise that might be unique to bioethicists are critically examined to determine if there is an expertise that might meet this requirement. Candidates include analyses of expertise based in "philosophical ethics," "casuistry," "atheoretical or situation ethics," "conventionalist relativism," "institutional guidance," (...)
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  • Whistleblowing and the Bioethicist’s Public Obligations.D. Robert Macdougall - 2014 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 23 (4):431-442.
    Bioethicists are sometimes thought to have heightened obligations by virtue of the fact that their professional role addresses ethics or morals. For this reason it has been argued that bioethicists ought to “whistleblow”—that is, publicly expose the wrongful or potentially harmful activities of their employer—more often than do other kinds of employees. This article argues that bioethicists do indeed have a heightened obligation to whistleblow, but not because bioethicists have heightened moral obligations in general. Rather, the special duties of bioethicists (...)
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  • Anthropological and Sociological Critiques of Bioethics.Leigh Turner - 2009 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 6 (1):83-98.
    Anthropologists and sociologists offer numerous critiques of bioethics. Social scientists criticize bioethicists for their arm-chair philosophizing and socially ungrounded pontificating, offering philosophical abstractions in response to particular instances of suffering, making all-encompassing universalistic claims that fail to acknowledge cultural differences, fostering individualism and neglecting the importance of families and communities, and insinuating themselves within the “belly” of biomedicine. Although numerous aspects of bioethics warrant critique and reform, all too frequently social scientists offer ungrounded, exaggerated criticisms of bioethics. Anthropological and sociological (...)
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  • Mapping Our Practice? Some Conceptual “Bumps” for Us to Consider.Christy Simpson - 2012 - HEC Forum 24 (3):219-226.
    There are several important conceptual issues and questions about the practice of healthcare ethics that can, and should, inform the development of any practice standards. This paper provides a relatively short overview of seven of these issues, with the invitation for further critical reflection and examination of their relevance to and implications for practice standards. The seven issues described include: diversity (from the perspective of training and experience); moral expertise and authority/influence; being an insider or outsider; flexibility and adaptability (for (...)
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  • A Pilot Qualitative Study of “Conflicts of Interests and/or Conflicting Interests” Among Canadian Bioethicists. Part 1: Five Cases, Experiences and Lessons Learned. [REVIEW]Andrea Frolic & Paula Chidwick - 2010 - HEC Forum 22 (1):5-17.
    In this pilot qualitative study 13 clinical bioethicists from across Canada were interviewed about their experiences of conflicts of interest and/or conflicting interests in their professional roles. The interviews generated five composite cases. Participants reported being significantly impacted by these experiences both personally and professionally.
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  • Clinical Ethics and the Road Less Taken: Mapping the Future by Tracking the Past.Susan B. Rubin & Laurie Zoloth - 2004 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 32 (2):218-225.
  • Clinical Ethics and the Road Less Taken: Mapping the Future by Tracking the Past.Susan B. Rubin & Laurie Zoloth - 2004 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 32 (2):218-225.
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