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  1. Autisme Als Meerduidig En Dynamisch Fenomeen.Kristien Hens & Leni Van Goidsenhoven - 2018 - Algemeen Nederlands Tijdschrift voor Wijsbegeerte 110 (4):421-451.
    Autism as a polysemic and dynamic phenomenon In this paper we demonstrate how the dominant discourse about autism, that stresses biological explanations, has certain ethical implications. On the one hand, such discourse is exculpating. In autism’s history, genetic explanations helped removing the blame from so-called refrigerator mothers. In present-day diagnostic practice, the idea of having a biological diagnosis helps people and their parents see beyond blame and guilt. On the other hand, a simplistic approach to biology risks neglecting the experiences (...)
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  • Stabilizing Autism: A Fleckian Account of the Rise of a Neurodevelopmental Spectrum Disorder.Berend Verhoeff - 2014 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 46 (1):65-78.
    Using the conceptual tools of philosopher of science Ludwik Fleck, I argue that the reframing of autism as a neurodevelopmental spectrum disorder is constrained by two governing ‘styles of thought’ of contemporary psychiatry. The first is the historically conditioned ‘readiness for directed perception’ of, and thinking in terms of, ontologically distinct diseases. The clinical gaze of mental health professionals, the bureaucratic needs of health administration, the clinical and scientific utility of disease categories, and the practices of autism-oriented advocacy groups all (...)
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  • Reading the Minds of Others: Radical Interpretation and the Empirical Study of Childhood Cognitive Development.Manuela Ungureanu - 2004 - Dialogue 43 (3):527-554.
    RÉSUMÉ: Le point de vue de Davidson sur les concepts de croyance et de signification implicites dans nos pratiques d’attribution de croyance et de signification peut à bon droit être mis à l’épreuve par une élucidation de ses rapports avec la psychologie empirique. Mais une telle mise à l’épreuve n’a de valeur que si elle confronte d’abord l’id’e reçue voulant que sa position a peu ou pas de liens avec l’etude empirique du développement cognitif. Je défends ici une approche du (...)
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  • Constructing a Social Subject: Autism and Human Sociality in the 1980s.Gregory Hollin - 2014 - History of the Human Sciences 27 (4):98-115.
    This article examines three key aetiological theories of autism, which emerged within cognitive psychology in the latter half of the 1980s. Drawing upon Foucault’s notion of ‘forms of possible knowledge’, and in particular his concept of savoir or depth knowledge, two key claims are made. First, it is argued that a particular production of autism became available to questions of truth and falsity following a radical reconstruction of ‘the social’ in which human sociality was taken both to exclusively concern interpersonal (...)
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  • Creativity, Psychosis, Autism, and the Social Brain.Michael Fitzgerald & Ziarih Hawi - 2008 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (3):268-269.
    In the target article, Crespi & Badcock (C&B) propose a novel hypothesis based on observations that a large set of phenotypic traits exhibit diametrically opposite phenotypes in autism-spectrum versus psychotic-spectrum conditions. They propose that development of these conditions is mediated in part by alterations in This hypothesis is based on the model of the Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes. The authors have produced a masterful discussion of the differences between psychosis and autism. Of course, another article could be written on the (...)
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  • The Gaze Cueing Effect and Its Enhancement by Facial Expressions Are Impacted by Task Demands: Direct Comparison of Target Localization and Discrimination Tasks.Zelin Chen, Sarah D. McCrackin, Alicia Morgan & Roxane J. Itier - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
    The gaze cueing effect is characterized by faster attentional orienting to a gazed-at than a non-gazed-at target. This effect is often enhanced when the gazing face bears an emotional expression, though this finding is modulated by a number of factors. Here, we tested whether the type of task performed might be one such modulating factor. Target localization and target discrimination tasks are the two most commonly used gaze cueing tasks, and they arguably differ in cognitive resources, which could impact how (...)
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  • Emotional Awareness and Responsible Agency.Nathan Stout - 2019 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 10 (2):337-362.
    This paper aims to further examine the relationship between self-awareness and agency by focusing on the role that emotional awareness plays in prominent conceptions of responsibility. One promising way of approaching this task is by focusing on individuals who display impairments in emotional awareness and then examining the effects that these impairments have on their apparent responsibility for the actions that they perform. Individuals with autism spectrum disorder as well as other clinical groups who evince high degrees of the personality (...)
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  • Deconstructing and Reconstructing Theory of Mind.Sara M. Schaafsma, Donald W. Pfaff, Robert P. Spunt & Ralph Adolphs - 2015 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 19 (2):65-72.
    Usage of the term ‘theory of mind’ (ToM) has exploded across fields ranging from developmental psychology to social neuroscience and psychiatry research. However, its meaning is often vague and inconsistent, its biologi- cal bases are a subject of debate, and the methods used to study it are highly heterogeneous. Most crucially, its original definition does not permit easy downward translation to more basic processes such as those stud- ied by behavioral neuroscience, leaving the interpreta- tion of neuroimaging results opaque. We (...)
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  • Time, Language and Flexibility of the Mind: The Role of Mental Time Travel in Linguistic Comprehension and Production.Francesco Ferretti & Erica Cosentino - 2013 - Philosophical Psychology 26 (1):24-46.
    According to Chomsky, creativity is a critical property of human language, particularly the aspect of ?the creative use of language? concerning the appropriateness to a situation. How language can be creative but appropriate to a situation is an unsolvable mystery from the Chomskyan point of view. We propose that language appropriateness can be explained by considering the role of the human capacity for Mental Time Travel at its foundation, together with social and ecological intelligences within a triadic language-grounding system. Our (...)
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  • How the Body Shapes the Mind.Shaun Gallagher - 2005 - Oxford University Press UK.
    How the Body Shapes the Mind is an interdisciplinary work that addresses philosophical questions by appealing to evidence found in experimental psychology, neuroscience, studies of pathologies, and developmental psychology. There is a growing consensus across these disciplines that the contribution of embodiment to cognition is inescapable. Because this insight has been developed across a variety of disciplines, however, there is still a need to develop a common vocabulary that is capable of integrating discussions of brain mechanisms in neuroscience, behavioural expressions (...)
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  • Individual Differences in (Non-Visual) Processing Style Predict the Face Inversion Effect.Natalie A. Wyer, Douglas Martin, Tracey Pickup & C. Neil Macrae - 2012 - Cognitive Science 36 (2):373-384.
    Recent research suggests that individuals with relatively weak global precedence (i.e., a smaller propensity to view visual stimuli in a configural manner) show a reduced face inversion effect (FIE). Coupled with such findings, a number of recent studies have demonstrated links between an advantage for feature-based processing and the presentation of traits associated with autism among the general population. The present study sought to bridge these findings by investigating whether a relationship exists between the possession of autism-associated traits (i.e., as (...)
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  • Construction of Rules, Accountability and Moral Identity by High-Functioning Children with Autism.Laura Sterponi - 2004 - Discourse Studies 6 (2):207-228.
    This article explores how high-functioning children with autism navigate in the social world, specifically how they orient in the realm of norms and standards. In particular, this investigation focuses on rule violations episodes and sheds light on how these children account for their conduct and position themselves in the moral framework. This analysis shows that high-functioning children with autism can actively engage in discourse about norms and transgressions in an initiatory capacity, thereby displaying a mastery of social rules as a (...)
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  • Trust the Process: A New Scientific Outlook on Psychodramatic Spontaneity Training.Dani Yaniv - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  • The Hows and Whys of Face Memory: Level of Construal Influences the Recognition of Human Faces.Natalie A. Wyer, Timothy J. Hollins, Sabine Pahl & Jean Roper - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  • Analogical Reasoning in Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder: Evidence From an Eye-Tracking Approach.Enda Tan, Xueyuan Wu, Tracy Nishida, Dan Huang, Zhe Chen & Li Yi - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  • The Impact of Multisensory Integration Deficits on Speech Perception in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders.Ryan A. Stevenson, Magali Segers, Susanne Ferber, Morgan D. Barense & Mark T. Wallace - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
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  • Spatial Navigation in Autism Spectrum Disorders: A Critical Review.Alastair D. Smith - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  • Sensory Processing in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder and/or Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder in the Home and Classroom Contexts.Pilar Sanz-Cervera, Gemma Pastor-Cerezuela, Francisco González-Sala, Raúl Tárraga-Mínguez & Maria-Inmaculada Fernández-Andrés - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
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  • Semantic Verbal Fluency in Children with and Without Autism Spectrum Disorder: Relationship with Chronological Age and IQ.Gemma Pastor-Cerezuela, Maria-Inmaculada Fernández-Andrés, Mireia Feo-Álvarez & Francisco González-Sala - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
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  • Global Similarities and Multifaceted Differences in the Production of Partner-Specific Referential Pacts by Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders.Aparna Nadig, Shivani Seth & Michelle Sasson - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  • Semantic-Pragmatic Impairment in the Narratives of Children With Autism Spectrum Disorders.Naama Kenan, Ditza A. Zachor, Linda R. Watson & Esther Ben-Itzchak - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
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  • Unraveling the Nature of Autism: Finding Order Amid Change.Annika Hellendoorn, Lex Wijnroks & Paul P. M. Leseman - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  • Relationship Between Theory of Mind, Emotion Recognition, and Social Synchrony in Adolescents With and Without Autism.Paula Fitzpatrick, Jean A. Frazier, David Cochran, Teresa Mitchell, Caitlin Coleman & R. C. Schmidt - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  • Peripheral Global Neglect in High Vs. Low Autistic Tendency.Daniel P. Crewther & David P. Crewther - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
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  • Minimal Coherence Among Varied Theory of Mind Measures in Childhood and Adulthood.Katherine Rice Warnell & Elizabeth Redcay - 2019 - Cognition 191:103997.
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  • Guarding Against Over-Inclusive Notions of “Context”: Psycholinguistic and Electrophysiological Studies of Specific Context Functions in Schizophrenia.Debra Titone & J. Bruno Debruille - 2003 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (1):108-109.
    Phillips & Silverstein offer an exciting synthesis of ongoing efforts to link the clinical and cognitive manifestations of schizophrenia with cellular accounts of its pathophysiology. We applaud their efforts but wonder whether the highly inclusive notion of “context” adequately captures some important details regarding schizophrenia and NMDA/glutamate function that are suggested by work on language processing and cognitive electrophysiology.
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  • Setting Domain Boundaries for Convergence of Biological and Psychological Perspectives on Cognitive Coordination in Schizophrenia.J. P. Ginsberg - 2003 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (1):88-89.
    The claim that the disorganized subtype of schizophrenia results from glutamate hypofunction is enhanced by consideration of current subtypology of schizophrenia, symptom definition, interdependence of neurotransmitters, and the nature of the data needed to support the hypothesis. Careful specification clarifies the clinical reality of disorganization as a feature of schizophrenia and increases the utility of the subtype.
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  • Individual Differences in (Non‐Visual) Processing Style Predict the Face Inversion Effect.Natalie A. Wyer, Douglas Martin, Tracey Pickup & C. Neil Macrae - 2012 - Cognitive Science 36 (2):373-384.
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  • Perceived Interpersonal Synchrony Increases Empathy: Insights From Autism Spectrum Disorder.Svenja Koehne, Alexander Hatri, John T. Cacioppo & Isabel Dziobek - 2016 - Cognition 146:8-15.
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  • NMDA Synapses Can Bias Competition Between Object Representations and Mediate Attentional Selection.Antonino Raffone, Jaap M. J. Murre & Gezinus Wolters - 2003 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (1):100-101.
    Phillips & Silverstein emphasize the gain-control properties of NMDA synapses in cognitive coordination. We endorse their view and suggest that NMDA synapses play a crucial role in biased attentional competition and (visual) working memory. Our simulations show that NMDA synapses can control the storage rate of visual objects. We discuss specific predictions of our model about cognitive effects of NMDA-antagonists and schizophrenia.
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  • Other and Other Waters in the River: Autism and the Futility of Prediction.Matthew K. Belmonte - 2020 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 43.
    Autism has been described as a neural deficit in prediction, people with autism manifest low perceptual construal and are impaired at traversing psychological distances, and Gilead et al.'s hierarchy from iconic to multimodal to fully abstract, socially communicated representations is exactly the hierarchy of representational impairment in autism, making autism a natural behavioural and neurophysiological test case for the prediction–abstraction relationship.
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  • Linking Brain to Mind in Normal Behavior and Schizophrenia.Stephen Grossberg - 2003 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (1):90-90.
    To understand schizophrenia, a linking hypothesis is needed that shows how brain mechanisms lead to behavioral functions in normals, and also how breakdowns in these mechanisms lead to behavioral symptoms of schizophrenia. Such a linking hypothesis is now available that complements the discussion offered by Phillips & Silverstein (P&S).
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  • Reasons-Responsiveness and Moral Responsibility: The Case of Autism.Nathan Stout - 2016 - The Journal of Ethics 20 (4):401-418.
    In this paper, I consider a novel challenge to John Martin Fischer and Mark Ravizza’s reasons-responsiveness theory of moral responsibility. According to their view, agents possess the control necessary for moral responsibility if their actions proceed from a mechanism that is moderately reasons-responsive. I argue that their account of moderate reasons-responsiveness fails to provide necessary and sufficient conditions for moral responsibility since it cannot give an adequate account of the responsibility of individuals with autism spectrum disorder. Empirical evidence suggests that (...)
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  • Which Words Are Hard for Autistic Children to Learn?Graham Schafer, Tim I. Williams & Philip T. Smith - 2013 - Mind and Language 28 (5):661-698.
    Motivated by accounts of concept use in autistic spectrum disorder (ASD) and a computational model of weak central coherence (O'Loughlin and Thagard, 2000) we examined comprehension and production vocabulary in typically-developing children and those with ASD and Down syndrome (DS). Controlling for frequency, familiarity, length and imageability, Colorado Meaningfulness played a hitherto unremarked role in the vocabularies of children with ASD. High Colorado Meaningful words were underrepresented in the comprehension vocabularies of 2- to 12-year-olds with ASD. The Colorado Meaningfulness of (...)
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  • When the World Becomes 'Too Real': A Bayesian Explanation of Autistic Perception.Elizabeth Pellicano & David Burr - 2012 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 16 (10):504-510.
  • Psycho-Practice, Psycho-Theory and the Contrastive Case of Autism: How Practices of Mind Become Second-Nature.Victoria McGeer - 2001 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 8 (5-7):109-132.
    In philosophy, the last thirty years or so has seen a split between 'simulation theorists' and 'theory-theorists', with a number of variations on each side. In general, simulation theorists favour the idea that our knowledge of others is based on using ourselves as a working model of what complex psychological creatures are like. Theory-theorists claim that our knowledge of complex psychological creatures, including ourselves, is theoretical in character and so more like our knowledge of the world in general. The body (...)
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  • Salience and Context: Interpretation of Metaphorical and Literal Language by Young Adults Diagnosed with Asperger's Syndrome.Rachel Giora, Oshrat Gazal, Idit Goldstein, Ofer Fein & Argyris Stringaris - 2012 - Metaphor and Symbol 27 (1):22-54.
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  • On the Biology and Politics of Cognitive Sex Differences.David C. Geary - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):267-284.
    The male advantage in certain mathematical domains contributes to the difference in the numbers of males and females that enter math-intensive occupations, which in turn contributes to the sex difference in earnings. Understanding the nature and development of the sex difference in mathematical abilities is accordingly of social as well as scientific concern. A more complete understanding of the biological contributions to these differences can guide research on educational techniques that might someday produce more equal educational outcomes in mathematics and (...)
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  • Genetic Influences on Sex Differences in Outstanding Mathematical Reasoning Ability.Ada H. Zohar - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):266-267.
    Sexual selection provides an adequate partial explanation for the difference in means between the distributions, but fails to explain the difference in variance, that is, the overrepresentation of both boys with outstanding mathematical reasoning ability and boys with mental retardation. Other genetic factors are probably at work. While spatial ability is correlated with OMRA, so are other cognitive abilities. OMRA is not reducible to spatial ability; hence selection for navigational skill is unlikely to be the only mechanism by which males (...)
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  • Sex Differences and Evolutionary by-Products.Thomas Wynn, Forrest Tierson & Craig Palmer - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):265-266.
    From the perspective of evolutionary theory, we believe it makes more sense to view the sex differences in spatial cognition as being an evolutionary by-product of selection for optimal rates of fetal development. Geary does not convince us that his proposed selective factors operated with “sufficient precision, economy, and efficiency.” Moreover, the archaeological evidence does not support his proposed evolutionary scenario.
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  • Between-Sex Differences Are Often Averaging Artifacts.Hoben Thomas - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):265-265.
    The central problem in Geary's theory is how differences are conceptualized. Recent research has shown that between-sex differences on certain tasks are a consequence of averaging within sex differences. A mixture distribution models between-sex differences on several tasks well and does not appear congenial to a sexual-selection perspective.
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  • Able Youths and Achievement Tests.Julian C. Stanley & Heinrich Stumpf - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):263-264.
    Achievement test differences between boys and girls and between young men and young women, mostly favoring males, extend far beyond mathematics. Such pervasive differences, illustrated here, may require an explanatory theory broader than Geary's.
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  • Spatial Visualization and Sex-Related Differences in Mathematical Problem Solving.Julia A. Sherman - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):262-263.
    Spatial visualization as a key variable in sex-related differences in mathematical problem solving and spatial aspects of geometry is traced to the 1960s. More recent relevant data are presented. The variability debate is traced to the latter part of the nineteenth century and an explanation for it is suggested. An idea is presented for further research to clarify sex-related brain laterality differences in solving spatial problems.
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  • The Twain Shall Meet: Uniting the Analysis of Sex Differences and Within-Sex Variation.David C. Rowe - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):262-262.
    Spatial and mathematical abilities may be “sex-limited” traits. A sex-limited trait has the same determinants of variation within the sexes, but the genetic or environmental effects would be differentially expressed in males and females. New advances in structural equation modeling allow means and variation to be estimated simultaneously. When these statistical methods are combined with a genetically informative research design, it should be possible to demonstrate that the genes influencing spatial and mathematical abilities are sex-limited in their expression. This approach (...)
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  • The Logic of the Sociobiological Model Geary-Style.Diane Proudfoot - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):261-261.
    Geary's is the traditional view of the sexes. Yet each part of his argument – the move from sex differences in spatial ability and social preferences to a sex difference in mathematical ability, the claim that the former are biologically primary, and the sociobiological explanation of these differences – requires considerable further work. The notion of a biologically secondary ability is itself problematic.
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  • Sexual-Selection Accounts of Human Characteristics: Just So Stories or Scientific Hypotheses?Nora Newcombe & Mary Ann Baenninger - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):259-260.
    We evaluate three of Geary's claims, finding that there is little evidence for sex differences in object- vs. person-orientation; sex differences in competition, even if biologically caused, lead to sex differences in mathematics only given a certain style of teaching; and sex differences in mental rotation, though real, are not well explained in a sociobiological framework or by the proximate biological variables assumed by Geary.
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  • Resources Dimorphism Sexual Selection and Mathematics Achievement.Diana Eugenie Kornbrot - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):259-259.
    Geary's model is a worthy effort, but ambiguous on important issues. It ignores differential resource allocation, although this follows directly from sexual selection via differential parental investment. Dimorphism in primary traits is arbitrarily attributed to sexual selection via intramale competition, rather than direct evolutionary pressures. Dubious predictions are made about the consequences of raising mathematics achievement.
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  • Some Problematic Links Between Hunting and Geometry.Meredith M. Kimball - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):258-259.
    Geary's emphasis on hunting ignores the possible importance of other human activities, such as scavenging and gathering, in the evolution of spatial abilities. In addition, there is little evidence that links spatial abilities and math skills. Furthermore, such links have little practical importance given the small size of most differences and girls' superior performance in mathematics classrooms.
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  • A Critic with a Different Perspective.Lloyd G. Humphreys - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):257-258.
    To the extent that Geary's theory concerning biologically primary and secondary behaviors depends on factor analytic methods and findings, it is woefully weak. Factors have been mistakenly called primary mental abilities, but the adjective “primary” represents reification of a mathematical dimension defined by correlations. Fleshing out a factor beyond its mathematical properties requires much additional quantitative experimental and correlational research that goes far beyond mere factoring.
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  • Mating, Math Achievement, and Other Multiple Relationships.Diane F. Halpern - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (2):256-256.
    Although Geary's partitioning of mathematical abilities into those that are biologically primary and secondary is an advance over most sociobiological theories of cognitive sex differences, it remains untestable and ignores the spatial nature of women's traditional work. An alternative model based on underlying cognitive processes offers other advantages.
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