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Emotion experience

Cognition and Emotion 19 (4):473-497 (2005)

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  1. La estructura disposicional de los sentimientos.Omar Rosas - 2011 - Ideas Y Valores 60 (145):5-31.
    Con base en la teoría valorativa de las emociones, desarrollada por Frijda y sus colegas, se argumenta que los sentimientos pueden entenderse como parcialmente isomorfos a las emociones, cuyo rasgo fundamental radica en las disposiciones de un individuo a creer en sus experiencias emocionales y actu..
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  • The Functional Role of Emotions in Aesthetic Judgement.Ioannis Xenakis, Argyris Arnellos & John Darzentas - 2012 - New Ideas in Psychology 30 (2).
    Exploring emotions, in terms of their evolutionary origin; their basic neurobiological substratum, and their functional significance in autonomous agents, we propose a model of minimal functionality of emotions. Our aim is to provide a naturalized explanation – mostly based on an interactivist model of emergent representation and appraisal theory of emotions – concerning basic aesthetic emotions in the formation of aesthetic judgment. We suggest two processes the Cognitive Variables Subsystem (CVS) which is fundamental for the accomplishment of the function of (...)
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  • Emotion, the Bodily, and the Cognitive.Rick Anthony Furtak - 2010 - Philosophical Explorations 13 (1):51 – 64.
    In both psychology and philosophy, cognitive theories of emotion have met with increasing opposition in recent years. However, this apparent controversy is not so much a gridlock between antithetical stances as a critical debate in which each side is being forced to qualify its position in order to accommodate the other side of the story. Here, I attempt to sort out some of the disagreements between cognitivism and its rivals, adjudicating some disputes while showing that others are merely superficial. Looking (...)
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  • On the Causal Role of Appraisal in Emotion.Agnes Moors - 2013 - Emotion Review 5 (2):132-140.
    Many appraisal theories claim that appraisal causes emotion. Critics have rejected this claim because they believe (a) it is incompatible with the claim that appraisal is a part of emotion, (b) it is not empirically supported, (c) it is circular and hence nonempirical, and (d) there are alternative causes. I reply that (a) the causal claim is incompatible with the part claim on some but not all interpretations of the causal claim and the part claim, (b) the lack of empirical (...)
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  • Emotion Experience and its Varieties.Nico H. Frijda - 2009 - Emotion Review 1 (3):264-271.
    Emotion experience reflects some of the outcomes of the mostly nonconscious processes that compose emotions. In my view, the major processes are appraisal, affect, action readiness, and autonomic arousal. The phenomenology of emotion experience varies according to mode of consciousness (nonreflective or reflective consciousness), and to direction and mode of attention. As a result, emotion experience may be either ineffable or articulate with respect to any or all of the underlying processes. In addition, emotion experience reflects the degree to which (...)
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  • Emotion and Value : A Phenomenological Approach.Vanello Daniel - 2016 - Dissertation, University of Warwick. Department of Philosophy
    In this thesis I argue that the affective component of emotional experience plays an essential explanatory role in the acquisition of evaluative knowledge. I call this the notion of affect as a disclosure of value. The thesis is divided into two parts. In the first part I critically assess three contemporary accounts which, I argue, are motivated either implicitly or explicitly by the notion of affect as a disclosure of value. I argue that all three accounts fail due to the (...)
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  • Disgust, Sadness, and Appraisal: Disgusted Consumers Dislike Food More Than Sad Ones.Kosuke Motoki & Motoaki Sugiura - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  • To Whistleblow or Not to Whistleblow: Affective and Cognitive Differences in Reporting Peers and Advisors.Tristan McIntosh, Cory Higgs, Megan Turner, Paul Partlow, Logan Steele, Alexandra E. MacDougall, Shane Connelly & Michael D. Mumford - 2019 - Science and Engineering Ethics 25 (1):171-210.
    Traditional whistleblowing theories have purported that whistleblowers engage in a rational process in determining whether or not to blow the whistle on misconduct. However, stressors inherent to whistleblowing often impede rational thinking and act as a barrier to effective whistleblowing. The negative impact of these stressors on whistleblowing may be made worse depending on who engages in the misconduct: a peer or advisor. In the present study, participants are presented with an ethical scenario where either a peer or advisor engages (...)
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  • Goals of Action and Emotional Reasons for Action. A Modern Version of the Theory of Ultimate Psychological Hedonism.Ulrich Mees & Annette Schmitt - 2008 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 38 (2):157–178.
    In this paper we present a modern version of the classic theory of “ultimate psychological hedonism” . As does the UPH, our two-dimensional model of metatelic orientations also postulates a fundamentally hedonistic motivation for any human action. However, it makes a distinction between “telic” or content-based goals of actions and “metatelic” or emotional reasons for actions. In our view, only the emotional reasons for action, but not the goals of action, conform to the UPH. After outlining our model, we will (...)
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  • Basic Emotions or Ur-Emotions?Nico H. Frijda & W. Gerrod Parrott - 2011 - Emotion Review 3 (4):406-415.
    This article sets out to replace the concept of basic emotions with the notion of “ur-emotions,” the functionally central underlying processes of action readiness, which are not emotions at all. We propose that what is basic and universal in emotions are not multicomponential syndromes, but states of action readiness, themselves variants of motive states to relate or not relate with the world and with oneself. Unlike emotions, ur-emotions can be held to be universal and biologically based.
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  • Getting Bodily Feelings Into Emotional Experience in the Right Way.Fabrice Teroni & Julien A. Deonna - 2017 - Emotion Review 9 (1):55-63.
    We argue that the main objections against two central tenets of a Jamesian account of the emotions, i.e. that (1) different types of emotions are associated with specific types of bodily feelings (Specificity), and that (2) emotions are constituted by patterns of bodily feeling (Constitution), do not succeed. In the first part, we argue that several reasons adduced against Specifity, including one inspired by Schachter and Singer’s work, are unconvincing. In the second part, we argue that Constitution, too, can withstand (...)
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  • Emotion, Perception, and Natural Kinds.Juan José Acero Fernández & José Manuel Palma Muñoz - 2013 - Biological Theory 7 (2):153-161.
    The question addressed in this paper is whether particular emotional experiences or episodes of an emotion (such as two experiences of happiness) belong to a natural kind. The final answer to this question is that although some, even many, single episodes of an emotion may group into a natural kind, belonging to a natural kind is a highly contextual matter. The proposal relies on two premises. First, a conception of natural kind-hood that follows Boyd’s Homeostatic Property Cluster Theory. Second, a (...)
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  • Differential Impact of Beliefs on Valence and Arousal.Antoinette Nicolle & Vinod Goel - 2013 - Cognition and Emotion 27 (2):263-272.
  • Cognition and Emotionover Twenty-Five Years.Keith Oatley, W. Gerrod Parrott, Craig Smith & Fraser Watts - 2011 - Cognition and Emotion 25 (8):1341-1348.
  • How to Push Someone's Buttons: A Comparison of Four Anger-Induction Methods.Jill Lobbestael, Arnoud Arntz & Reinout W. Wiers - 2008 - Cognition and Emotion 22 (2):353-373.
  • Emotions, Individual Differences and Time Course: Reflections.Nico H. Frijda - 2009 - Cognition and Emotion 23 (7):1444-1461.
  • Affect is a Form of Cognition: A Neurobiological Analysis.Seth Duncan & Lisa Feldman Barrett - 2007 - Cognition and Emotion 21 (6):1184-1211.
  • Contradictions of Emotion in Schizophrenia.Louis Sass - 2007 - Cognition and Emotion 21 (2):351-390.
  • Appraisals Are Direct, Immediate, Intuitive, and Unwitting… and Some Are Reflective….Arvid Kappas - 2006 - Cognition and Emotion 20 (7):952-975.