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  1. Conflicts of Interest in Clinical Ethics Consults.Elliott Mark Weiss, Aaron Wightman, Laura Webster & Douglas Diekema - 2021 - Journal of Medical Ethics 47 (12):61-61.
    Although there is wide agreement that ethics consults are at risk for conflicts of interest, ethics consultants have limited guidance with regard to how to identify and approach COIs. We aim to address these concerns and provide practical guidance. We will define and consider four categories of COIs: consult type, team composition, dual clinical roles and other concerns. We will define and consider six actions available for ECs to take in response to COIs: no action, disclosure only, obtaining a second (...)
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  • Grassroots Origins, National Engagement: Exploring the Professionalization of Practicing Healthcare Ethicists in Canada. [REVIEW]Andrea Frolic - 2012 - HEC Forum 24 (3):153-164.
    Canadian ethicists have a long legacy of leadership in advocating for standards and quality in healthcare ethics. Continuing this tradition, a grassroots organization of practicing healthcare ethicists (PHEs) concerned about the lack of standardization in the field recently formed to explore potential options related to professionalization. This group calls itself “practicing healthcare ethicists exploring professionalization” (PHEEP). This paper provides a description of the process by which PHEEP has begun to engage the Canadian PHE community in the development of practice standards (...)
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  • Echo Calling Narcissus: What Exceeds the Gaze of Clinical Ethics Consultation? [REVIEW]Jeffrey P. Bishop, Joseph B. Fanning & Mark J. Bliton - 2010 - HEC Forum 22 (1):171-171.
    Erratum to: Echo Calling Narcissus: What Exceeds the Gaze of Clinical Ethics Consultation? Content Type Journal Article Pages 171-171 DOI 10.1007/s10730-010-9132-7 Authors Jeffrey P. Bishop, Saint Louis University Tenet Chair of Health Care Ethics, Albert Gnaegi Center for Health Care Ethics Salus Center, Room 527, 3545 Lafayette Ave St. Louis MO 63104-1314 USA Joseph B. Fanning, Vanderbilt University Center for Biomedical Ethics and Society 2525 West End Ave., 4th Floor, Suite 400 Nashville TN 37203 USA Mark J. Bliton, Vanderbilt University (...)
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  • Conflicts of Interest Policies for Authors, Peer Reviewers, and Editors of Bioethics Journals.Zubin Master, Kelly Werner, Elise Smith, David B. Resnik & Bryn Williams-Jones - 2018 - AJOB Empirical Bioethics 9 (3):194-205.
    Background: In biomedical research, there have been numerous scandals highlighting conflicts of interest (COIs) leading to significant bias in judgment and questionable practices. Academic institutions, journals, and funding agencies have developed and enforced policies to mitigate issues related to COI, especially surrounding financial interests. After a case of editorial COI in a prominent bioethics journal, there is concern that the same level of oversight regarding COIs in the biomedical sciences may not apply to the field of bioethics. In this study, (...)
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  • Conceptualizing Boundaries for the Professionalization of Healthcare Ethics Practice: A Call for Empirical Research.Nancy C. Brown & Summer Johnson McGee - 2014 - HEC Forum 26 (4):325-341.
    One of the challenges of modern healthcare ethics practice is the navigation of boundaries. Practicing healthcare ethicists in the performance of their role must navigate meanings, choices, decisions and actions embedded in complex cultural and social relationships amongst diverse individuals. In light of the evolving state of modern healthcare ethics practice and the recent move toward professionalization via certification, understanding boundary navigation in healthcare ethics practice is critical. Because healthcare ethics is endowed with many boundaries which often delineate concerns about (...)
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  • Mapping Our Practice? Some Conceptual “Bumps” for Us to Consider.Christy Simpson - 2012 - HEC Forum 24 (3):219-226.
    There are several important conceptual issues and questions about the practice of healthcare ethics that can, and should, inform the development of any practice standards. This paper provides a relatively short overview of seven of these issues, with the invitation for further critical reflection and examination of their relevance to and implications for practice standards. The seven issues described include: diversity (from the perspective of training and experience); moral expertise and authority/influence; being an insider or outsider; flexibility and adaptability (for (...)
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  • Echo Calling Narcissus: What Exceeds the Gaze of Clinical Ethics Consultation?Jeffrey P. Bishop, Joseph B. Fanning & Mark J. Bliton - 2010 - HEC Forum 22 (1):73-84.
    Guiding our response in this essay is our view that current efforts to demarcate the role of the clinical ethicist risk reducing its complex network of authorizations to sites of power and payment. In turn, the role becomes susceptible to various ideologies—individualisms, proceduralisms, secularisms—that further divide the body from the web of significances that matter to that body, where only she, the patient, is located. The security of policy, standards, and employment will pull against and eventually sever the authorization secured (...)
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  • Beyond Trail Blazing: A Roadmap for New Healthcare Ethics Leaders (and the People Who Hire Them). [REVIEW]Cheryl Cline, Andrea Frolic & Robert Sibbald - 2013 - HEC Forum 25 (3):211-227.
    This article is intended to serve as a roadmap to help new healthcare ethics leaders establish or renew an ethics program in a healthcare organization. The authors share a systemic step-by-step process for navigating this early career passage. In this paper, we describe five critical success strategies and provide explanations and concrete tools to help get you on the road to success as quickly and painlessly as possible. We will discuss how to define your role; diagnose your organization’s needs; build (...)
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