Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Berkeley on Voluntary Motion: A Conservationist Account.Takaharu Oda - 2018 - Ruch Filozoficzny 74 (4):71–98.
    A plausible reading of Berkeley’s view of voluntary motion is occasionalism; this, however, leads to a specious conclusion against his argument of human action. Differing from an unqualified occasionalist reading, I consider the alternative reading that Berkeley is a conservationist regarding bodily motion by the human mind at will. That is, finite minds (spirits) immediately cause motions in their body parts, albeit under the divine conservation. My argument then comports with the conservationist reading from three perspectives: (i) theodicy that the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Divine Action and God’s Immutability: A Historical Case Study On How To Resist Occasionalism.Andrea Sangiacomo - 2015 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 7 (4):115--135.
    Today’s debates present ”occasionalism’ as the position that any satisfying account of divine action must avoid. In this paper I discuss how a leading Cartesian author of the end of the seventeenth century, Pierre-Sylvain Régis, attempted to avoid occasionalism. Régis’s case is illuminating because it stresses both the difficulties connected with the traditional alternatives to occasionalism and also those aspects embedded in the occasionalist position that should be taken into due account. The paper focuses on Régis’s own account of secondary (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Our Inalienable Ability to Sin: Peter Olivi’s Rejection of Asymmetrical Freedom.Bonnie Kent - 2017 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 25 (6):1073-1092.
    From the time of Augustine to the late thirteenth century, leading Christian thinkers agreed that freedom requires the ability to make good choices, but not the ability to make bad ones. If freedom required the ability to sin, they reasoned, neither God nor the angels nor the blessed in heaven could be free. This essay examines the work of Peter Olivi, the first medieval philosopher known to reject the asymmetrical conception of freedom. Olivi argues that the ability to sin is (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • From Secondary Causes to Artificial Instruments: Pierre-Sylvain Régis's Rethinking of Scholastic Accounts of Causation.Andrea Sangiacomo - 2016 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 60:7-17.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation