Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Introduction: Empathy and Collective Intentionality—The Social Philosophy of Edith Stein.Thomas Szanto & Dermot Moran - 2015 - Human Studies 38 (4):445-461.
  • The Interactive Turn in Social Cognition Research: A Critique.Søren Overgaard & John Michael - 2015 - Philosophical Psychology 28 (2):160-183.
    Proponents of the so-called “interactive turn in social cognition research” maintain that mainstream research on social cognition has been fundamentally flawed by its neglect of social interaction, and that a new paradigm is needed in order to redress this shortcoming. We argue that proponents of the interactive turn (“interactionists”) have failed to properly substantiate their criticisms of existing research on social cognition. Although it is sometimes unclear precisely what these criticisms of existing theories are supposed to target, we sketch two (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  • Moments of Recognition: Deontic Power and Bodily Felt Demands.Henning Nörenberg - forthcoming - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences:1-16.
    While the current discussion on embodied cognition provides valuable accounts of an agent’s bodily sensitivity to instrumental possibilities, in this paper I investigate felt demands as the bodily-affective dimension of the agent’s recognition of deontic powers such as obligations. I argue that there is a close kinship between felt demands and affordances in the stricter sense. I will suggest that what is unique about felt demands on an experiential level is that they involve an evaluative perspective arising from acute or (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Encultured Mind: From Cognitive Science to Social Epistemology.David Alexander Eck - unknown
    There have been monumental advances in the study of the social dimensions of knowledge in the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. But it has been common within a wide variety of fields--including social philosophy, cognitive science, epistemology, and the philosophy of science--to approach the social dimensions of knowledge as simply another resource to be utilized or controlled. I call this view, in which other people's epistemic significance are only of instrumental value, manipulationism. I identify manipulationism, trace its manifestations in (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Human Distributed Cognition From an Organism-in-Its-Environment Perspective.Jaime F. Cárdenas-García & Tim Ireland - 2017 - Biosemiotics 10 (2):265-278.
    The organism-in-its-environment is recognized as the basic unit of analysis when dealing with living beings. This paper seeks to define the fundamental implications of the concept of the organism-in-its-environment in terms of the biosemiotic concept of human distributed cognition. Human distributed cognition in a biosemiotic context is defined as the ability of a self-referencing organism-in-its-environment to interact with its environment to satisfy its physiological and social needs to survive and sustain itself. The ontogenetic development of the organism-in-its-environment serves as the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • How Do Soccer Players Adjust Their Activity in Team Coordination? An Enactive Phenomenological Analysis.Vincent Gesbert, Annick Durny & Denis Hauw - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Locating the Lived Body in Client–Nurse Interactions: Embodiment, Intersubjectivity and Intercorporeality.Helen F. Harrison, Elizabeth Anne Kinsella & Sandra DeLuca - 2019 - Nursing Philosophy 20 (2):e12241.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Empathy, Group Identity, and the Mechanisms of Exclusion: An Investigation Into the Limits of Empathy.Thomas Fuchs - 2019 - Topoi 38 (1):239-250.
    There is a conspicuous tendency of humans to experience empathy and sympathy preferentially towards members of their own group, whereas empathetic feelings towards outgroup members or strangers are often reduced or even missing. This may culminate in a “dissociation of empathy”: a historical example are the cases of Nazi perpetrators who behaved as compassionate family men on the one hand, yet committed crimes of utter cruelty against Jews on the other. The paper aims at explaining such phenomena and at determining (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The ‘Meeting of Bodies’: Empathy and Basic Forms of Shared Experiences.Anna Ciaunica - 2019 - Topoi 38 (1):185-195.
    In recent years there has been an increasing focus on a crucial aspect of the ‘meeting of minds’ problem :160–165, 2013), namely the ability that human beings have for sharing different types of mental states such as emotions, intentions, and perceptual experiences. In this paper I examine what counts as basic forms of ‘shared experiences’ and focus on a relatively overlooked aspect of human embodiment, namely the fact that we start our journey into our experiential life within the experiencing body (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Introduction: Empathy, Shared Emotions, and Social Identity.Thomas Szanto & Joel Krueger - 2019 - Topoi 38 (1):153-162.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Early Social Cognition: Alternatives to Implicit Mindreading.Leon de Bruin, Derek Strijbos & Marc Slors - 2011 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 2 (3):499-517.
    According to the BD-model of mindreading, we primarily understand others in terms of beliefs and desires. In this article we review a number of objections against explicit versions of the BD-model, and discuss the prospects of using its implicit counterpart as an explanatory model of early emerging socio-cognitive abilities. Focusing on recent findings on so-called ‘implicit’ false belief understanding, we put forward a number of considerations against the adoption of an implicit BD-model. Finally, we explore a different way to make (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  • Early Social Cognition: Alternatives to Implicit Mindreading.Leon Bruin, Derek Strijbos & Marc Slors - 2011 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 2 (3):499-517.
    According to the BD-model of mindreading, we primarily understand others in terms of beliefs and desires. In this article we review a number of objections against explicit versions of the BD-model, and discuss the prospects of using its implicit counterpart as an explanatory model of early emerging socio-cognitive abilities. Focusing on recent findings on so-called ‘implicit’ false belief understanding, we put forward a number of considerations against the adoption of an implicit BD-model. Finally, we explore a different way to make (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Hypnotic Experience and the Autism Spectrum Disorder. A Phenomenological Investigation.Till Grohmann - 2018 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 17 (5):889-909.
    In recent decades, the focus in autism research progressively expanded. It presently offers extensive material on sensorimotor disturbances as well as on perceptive-cognitive preferences of people with autism. The present article proposes not only a critical interpretation of the common theoretical framework in autism research but also focuses on certain experiences common to some people with autism and which can be appropriately understood by phenomenology. What I will call “hypnotic experiences” in autism are moments in which some individuals withdraw into (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Understanding Social Engagement in Autism: Being Different in Perceiving and Sharing Affordances.Annika Hellendoorn - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Sociality and the Life–Mind Continuity Thesis.Tom Froese & Ezequiel A. Di Paolo - 2009 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 8 (4):439-463.
    The life–mind continuity thesis holds that mind is prefigured in life and that mind belongs to life. The biggest challenge faced by proponents of this thesis is to show how an explanatory framework that accounts for basic biological processes can be systematically extended to incorporate the highest reaches of human cognition. We suggest that this apparent ‘cognitive gap’ between minimal and human forms of life appears insurmountable largely because of the methodological individualism that is prevalent in cognitive science. Accordingly, a (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  • Nonverbal Synchrony and Affect in Dyadic Interactions.Wolfgang Tschacher, Georg M. Rees & Fabian Ramseyer - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  • We Can Work It Out: An Enactive Look at Cooperation.Valentina Fantasia, Hanne De Jaegher & Alessandra Fasulo - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Why the Capacity to Pretend Matters for Empathy.Line Ryberg Ingerslev - 2014 - Topoi 33 (1):1-13.
    A phenomenological insight in the debate on empathy is that it is possible to directly perceive other people’s emotions in their expressive bodily behaviour. Contrary to what is suggested by many phenomenologists, namely that this perceptual skill is immediately available if one has vision, this paper argues that the perceptual skill for empathy is acquired. Such a skill requires that we have undergone certain emotional experiences ourselves and that we have had the experience of seeing the world differently, which is (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Collective Moods. A Contribution to the Phenomenology and Interpersonality of Shared Affectivity.Nina Trcka - 2017 - Philosophia 45 (4):1647-1662.
    Collective moods are ubiquitous in social life. People may experience the sharing of a mood at a large sporting event, a concert or a religious ceremony, but also at a small family celebration or as part of a tour group. However, in philosophical discussions, collective moods are often framed as experiences of ecstasy, intoxication or even disinhibition at mass events without examining other aspects. Yet we practice and cultivate the sharing of moods in quite varied forms. In this paper I (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Violence of the Ethical Encounter: Listening to the Suffering Subject as a Speaking Body.Dorothée Legrand - 2018 - Continental Philosophy Review 51 (1):43-64.
    How does the clinical encounter work? To tackle this question, the present study centers on the paradigmatic clinical encounter, namely, psychoanalysis, paradigmatic in that it is structured by the encounter itself. Our question thus becomes: how does the clinical encounter work, when its only modality is speech? By reading Jacques Lacan and Emmanuel Levinas together, we better identify how speech sets up as subjects those who address one another and how this subjectivation touches the suffering body specifically. In this framework, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Embodied Cognition and Temporally Extended Agency.Markus Schlosser - 2018 - Synthese 195 (5):2089-2112.
    According to radical versions of embodied cognition, human cognition and agency should be explained without the ascription of representational mental states. According to a standard reply, accounts of embodied cognition can explain only instances of cognition and agency that are not “representation-hungry”. Two main types of such representation-hungry phenomena have been discussed: cognition about “the absent” and about “the abstract”. Proponents of representationalism have maintained that a satisfactory account of such phenomena requires the ascription of mental representations. Opponents have denied (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Narrative and Embodiment – a Scalar Approach.Allan Køster - 2017 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 16 (5):893-908.
    Recent work on the relation between narrative and selfhood has emphasized embodiment as an indispensable foundation for selfhood. This has occasioned an interesting debate on the relation between embodiment and narrative. In this paper, I attempt to mediate the range of conflicting intuitions within the debate by proposing a scalar approach to narrative and an accompanying concept of a split-self. Drawing on theoretical developments from contemporary narratology, I argue that we need to move away from a binary understanding of narrative (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Vulnerability to Psychosis, I-Thou Intersubjectivity and the Praecox-Feeling.Somogy Varga - 2013 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 12 (1):131-143.
    Psychotic and prodromal states are characterized by distortions of intersubjectivity, and a number of psychopathologists see in the concrete I-You frame of the clinical encounter the manifestation of such impairment. Rümke has coined the term of ‘praecox-feeling’, designated to describe a feeling of unease emanating in the interviewer that reflects the detachment of the patient and the failure of an ‘affective exchange.’ While the reliability of the praecox-feeling as a diagnostic tool has since been established, the explanation and theoretical framing (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • On the Role of Social Interaction in Social Cognition: A Mechanistic Alternative to Enactivism.Mitchell Herschbach - 2012 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 11 (4):467-486.
    Researchers in the enactivist tradition have recently argued that social interaction can constitute social cognition, rather than simply serve as the context for social cognition. They contend that a focus on social interaction corrects the overemphasis on mechanisms inside the individual in the explanation of social cognition. I critically assess enactivism’s claims about the explanatory role of social interaction in social cognition. After sketching the enactivist approach to cognition in general and social cognition in particular, I identify problems with an (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  • We Read Minds to Shape Relationships.Vivian Bohl - 2015 - Philosophical Psychology 28 (5):674-694.
    Mindreading is often considered to be the most important human social cognitive skill, and over the past three decades, several theories of the cognitive mechanisms for mindreading have been proposed. But why do we read minds? According to the standard view, we attribute mental states to individuals to predict and explain their behavior. I argue that the standard view is too general to capture the distinctive function of mindreading, and that it does not explain what motivates people to read minds. (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Personal History, Beyond Narrative: An Embodied Perspective.Allan Køster - 2017 - Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 48 (2):163-187.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • In Defense of Phenomenological Approaches to Social Cognition: Interacting with the Critics.Shaun Gallagher - 2012 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 3 (2):187-212.
    I clarify recently developed phenomenological approaches to social cognition. These are approaches that, drawing on developmental science, social neuroscience, and dynamic systems theory, emphasize the involvement of embodied and enactive processes together with communicative and narrative practices in contexts of intersubjective understanding. I review some of the evidence that supports these approaches. I consider a variety of criticisms leveled against them, and defend the role of phenomenology in the explanation of social cognition. Finally, I show how these phenomenological approaches can (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   23 citations  
  • Self-Consciousness and Intersubjectivity: Dimensions of the Social Self.Katja Crone & Wolfgang Huemer - 2018 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 17 (2):225-229.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Phenomenology of Depression and the Nature of Empathy.Matthew Ratcliffe - 2014 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 17 (2):269-280.
    This paper seeks to illuminate the nature of empathy by reflecting upon the phenomenology of depression. I propose that depression involves alteration of an aspect of experience that is seldom reflected upon or discussed, thus making it hard to understand. This alteration involves impairment or loss of a capacity for interpersonal relatedness that mutual empathy depends upon. The sufferer thus feels cut off from other people, and may remark on their indifference, hostility or inability to understand. Drawing upon the example (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  • Gestural Sense-Making: Hand Gestures as Intersubjective Linguistic Enactments. [REVIEW]Elena Cuffari - 2012 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 11 (4):599-622.
    The ubiquitous human practice of spontaneously gesturing while speaking demonstrates the embodiment, embeddedness, and sociality of cognition. The present essay takes gestural practice to be a paradigmatic example of a more general claim: human cognition is social insofar as our embedded, intelligent, and interacting bodies select and construct meaning in a way that is intersubjectively constrained and defeasible. Spontaneous co-speech gesture is markedly interesting because it at once confirms embodied aspects of linguistic meaning-making that formalist and linguistic turn-type philosophical approaches (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Extended Cognition and the Space of Social Interaction.Joel Krueger - 2011 - Consciousness and Cognition 20 (3):643-657.
    The extended mind thesis (EM) asserts that some cognitive processes are (partially) composed of actions consisting of the manipulation and exploitation of environmental structures. Might some processes at the root of social cognition have a similarly extended structure? In this paper, I argue that social cognition is fundamentally an interactive form of space management—the negotiation and management of ‘‘we-space”—and that some of the expressive actions involved in the negotiation and management of we-space (gesture, touch, facial and whole-body expressions) drive basic (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  • Do Early Body Ornaments Prove Cognitive Modernity? A Critical Analysis From Situated Cognition.Duilio Garofoli - 2015 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 14 (4):803-825.
    The documented appearance of body ornaments in the archaeological record of early anatomically modern human and late Neanderthal populations has been claimed to be proof of symbolism and cognitive modernity. Recently, Henshilwood and Dubreuil (Current Anthropology 52:361–400, 2011) have supported this stance by arguing that the use of beads and body painting implies the presence of properties typical of modern cognition: high-level theory of mind and awareness of abstract social standards. In this paper I shall disagree with this position. For (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Grasping Intersubjectivity: An Invitation to Embody Social Interaction Research.Hanne De Jaegher, Barbara Pieper, Daniel Clénin & Thomas Fuchs - 2017 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 16 (3):491-523.
    Underlying the recent focus on embodied and interactive aspects of social understanding are several intuitions about what roles the body, interaction processes, and interpersonal experience play. In this paper, we introduce a systematic, hands-on method for investigating the experience of interacting and its role in intersubjectivity. Special about this method is that it starts from the idea that researchers of social understanding are themselves one of the best tools for their own investigations. The method provides ways for researchers to calibrate (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • The Phenomenology of Hypo- and Hyperreality in Psychopathology.Zeno Van Duppen - 2016 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 15 (3):423-441.
    Contemporary perspectives on delusions offer valuable neuropsychiatric, psychoanalytic, and philosophical explanations of the formation and persistence of delusional phenomena. However, two problems arise. Firstly, these different perspectives offer us an explanation “from the outside”. They pay little attention to the actual personal experiences, and implicitly assume their incomprehensibility. This implicates a questionable validity. Secondly, these perspectives fail to account for two complex phenomena that are inherent to certain delusions, namely double book-keeping and the primary delusional experience. The purpose of this (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • The You-I Event: On the Genesis of Self-Awareness.Stephen Langfur - 2013 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 12 (4):769-790.
    I present empirical evidence suggesting that an infant first becomes aware of herself as the focal center of a caregiver's attending. Yet that does not account for her awareness of herself as agent. To address this question, I bring in research on neonatal imitation, as well as studies demonstrating the existence of a neural system in which parts of the same brain areas are activated when observing another's action and when executing a similar one. Applying these findings, I consider gestural (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Mirror Systems and Simulation: A Neo-Empiricist Interpretation. [REVIEW]John Michael - 2012 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 11 (4):565-582.
    It is often claimed that the discovery of mirror neurons supports simulation theory (ST). There has been much controversy about this, however, as there are various competing models of the functional contribution of mirror systems, only some of which characterize mirroring as simulation in the sense required by ST. But a brief review of these models reveals that they all include simulation in some sense . In this paper, I propose that the broader conception of simulation articulated by neo-empiricist theories (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Mindreading as Social Expertise.John Michael, Wayne Christensen & Søren Overgaard - 2014 - Synthese 191 (5):1-24.
    In recent years, a number of approaches to social cognition research have emerged that highlight the importance of embodied interaction for social cognition (Reddy, How infants know minds, 2008; Gallagher, J Conscious Stud 8:83–108, 2001; Fuchs and Jaegher, Phenom Cogn Sci 8:465–486, 2009; Hutto, in Seemans (ed.) Joint attention: new developments in psychology, philosophy of mind and social neuroscience, 2012). Proponents of such ‘interactionist’ approaches emphasize the importance of embodied responses that are engaged in online social interaction, and which, according (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Undisciplining Social Science: Wittgenstein and the Art of Creating Situated Practices of Social Inquiry.John Shotter - 2016 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 46 (1):60-83.
    There are now countless social scientific disciplines—listed either as the science of … X … or as an -ology of one kind or another—each with their own internal controversies as to what are their “proper objects of their study.” This profusion of separate sciences has emerged, and is still emerging, tainted by the classical Cartesian-Newtonian assumption of a mechanistic world. We still seem to assume that we can begin our inquiries simply by reflecting on the world around us, and by (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Understanding Others, Reciprocity, and Self-Consciousness.Katja Crone - 2018 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 17 (2):267-278.
    The article explores the basic conceptual relationship between social cognition, intersubjectivity and self-consciousness. A much-debated recent approach to social cognition, the so-called interaction theory, is the view that the ability to perceive, understand and interpret the behavior of others relies on interaction in the sense of mutual coordination of the embodied agents involved. It will be shown that this notion of reciprocity is too weak in order to fully account for social understanding. It will be argued that the idea of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Extended Body: A Case Study in the Neurophenomenology of Social Interaction. [REVIEW]Tom Froese & Thomas Fuchs - 2012 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 11 (2):205-235.
    There is a growing realization in cognitive science that a theory of embodied intersubjectivity is needed to better account for social cognition. We highlight some challenges that must be addressed by attempts to interpret ‘simulation theory’ in terms of embodiment, and argue for an alternative approach that integrates phenomenology and dynamical systems theory in a mutually informing manner. Instead of ‘simulation’ we put forward the concept of the ‘extended body’, an enactive and phenomenological notion that emphasizes the socially mediated nature (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   18 citations  
  • Interactionism and Mindreading.John Michael - 2011 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 2 (3):559-578.
    In recent years, a number of theorists have developed approaches to social cognition that highlight the centrality of social interaction as opposed to mindreading (e.g. Gallagher and Zahavi 2008 ; Gallagher 2001 , 2007 , 2008 ; Hobson 2002 ; Reddy 2008 ; Hutto 2004 ; De Jaegher 2009 ; De Jaegher and Di Paolo 2007 ; Fuchs and De Jaegher 2009 ; De Jaegher et al. 2010 ). There are important differences among these approaches, as I will discuss, but (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • Empathy and Direct Social Perception: A Phenomenological Proposal. [REVIEW]Dan Zahavi - 2011 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 2 (3):541-558.
    Quite a number of the philosophical arguments and objections currently being launched against simulation (ST) based and theory-theory (TT) based approaches to mindreading have a phenomenological heritage in that they draw on ideas found in the work of Husserl, Heidegger, Sartre, Merleau-Ponty, Stein, Gurwitsch, Scheler and Schutz. Within the last couple of years, a number of ST and TT proponents have started to react and respond to what one for the sake of simplicity might call the phenomenological proposal (PP). This (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   73 citations  
  • Enactivism, Second-Person Engagement and Personal Responsibility.Janna van Grunsven - 2018 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 17 (1):131-156.
    Over the course of the past few decades 4E approaches that theorize cognition and agency as embodied, embedded, extended, and/or enactive have garnered growing support from figures working in philosophy of mind and cognitive science. Correspondingly, there has been a rising interest in the wider conceptual and practical implications of 4E views. Several proposals have for instance been made regarding 4E’s bearing on ethical theory, 505–526, 2009; Cash, Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences, 9, 645–671 2010). In this paper I contribute (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Words as Cultivators of Others Minds.Theresa S. S. Schilhab - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The ‘We’ in ‘Me’: An Account of Minimal Relational Selfhood.Joe Higgins - forthcoming - Topoi:1-12.
    Many philosophers contend that selfhood involves a uniquely first-personal experiential dimension, which precedes any form of socially dependent selfhood. In this paper, I do not wish to deny the notion of such a “minimal” experiential dimension as encapsulating the very givenness of experience as for a certain subject, such that experiences are accessible to this subject in a way that they are not for others. However, I do wish to deny any temptation to view minimal experiential selfhood as ontogenetically more (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Reconstructing the Minimal Self, or How to Make Sense of Agency and Ownership.Sanneke de Haan & Leon de Bruin - 2010 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 9 (3):373-396.
    We challenge Gallagher’s distinction between the sense of ownership and the sense of agency as two separable modalities of experience of the minimal self and argue that a careful investigation of the examples provided to promote this distinction in fact reveals that SO and SA are intimately related and modulate each other. We propose a way to differentiate between the various notions of SO and SA that are currently used interchangeably in the debate, and suggest a more gradual reading of (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • Mirror Neurons, Husserl, and Enactivism: An Analysis of Phenomenological Compatibility.Genevieve Hayman - 2016 - Perspectives 6 (1):13-23.
  • Toward a Second-Person Neuroscience.Leonhard Schilbach, Bert Timmermans, Vasudevi Reddy, Alan Costall, Gary Bente, Tobias Schlicht & Kai Vogeley - 2013 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (4):393-414.
    In spite of the remarkable progress made in the burgeoning field of social neuroscience, the neural mechanisms that underlie social encounters are only beginning to be studied and could —paradoxically— be seen as representing the ‘dark matter’ of social neuroscience. Recent conceptual and empirical developments consistently indicate the need for investigations, which allow the study of real-time social encounters in a truly interactive manner. This suggestion is based on the premise that social cognition is fundamentally different when we are in (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   82 citations  
  • Creative Thinging.Lambros Malafouris - 2014 - Pragmatics and Cognitionpragmatics and Cognition 22 (1):140-158.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • The Bodily Social Self: A Link Between Phenomenal and Narrative Selfhood.Harry Farmer & Manos Tsakiris - 2012 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 3 (1):125-144.
    The Phenomenal Self (PS) is widely considered to be dependent on body representations, whereas the Narrative Self (NS) is generally thought to rely on abstract cognitive representations. The concept of the Bodily Social Self (BSS) might play an important role in explaining how the high level cognitive self-representations enabling the NS might emerge from the bodily basis of the PS. First, the phenomenal self (PS) and narrative self (NS), are briefly examined. Next, the BSS is defined and its potential for (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations