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  1. When “Good” is Not Always Right: Effect of the Consequences of Motor Action on Valence-Space Associations.Denis Brouillet, Audrey Milhau & Thibaut Brouillet - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  • The Body in Religion: The Spatial Mapping of Valence in Tibetan Practitioners of Bön.Heng Li & Yu Cao - 2019 - Cognitive Science 43 (4):e12728.
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  • Arbitrary Numbers Counter Fair Decisions: Trails of Markedness in Card Distribution.Philipp A. Schroeder & Roland Pfister - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  • Motor Imagery Shapes Abstract Concepts.Juanma Fuente, Daniel Casasanto, Isidro Martínez‐Cascales Jose & Julio Santiago - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (5):1350-1360.
    The concepts of “good” and “bad” are associated with right and left space. Individuals tend to associate good things with the side of their dominant hand, where they experience greater motor fluency, and bad things with their nondominant side. This mapping has been shown to be flexible: Changing the relative fluency of the hands, or even observing a change in someone else's motor fluency, results in a reversal of the conceptual mapping, such that good things become associated with the side (...)
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  • Spatializing Emotion: No Evidence for a Domain‐General Magnitude System.Benjamin Pitt & Daniel Casasanto - 2018 - Cognitive Science 42 (7):2150-2180.
    People implicitly associate different emotions with different locations in left-right space. Which aspects of emotion do they spatialize, and why? Across many studies people spatialize emotional valence, mapping positive emotions onto their dominant side of space and negative emotions onto their non-dominant side, consistent with theories of metaphorical mental representation. Yet other results suggest a conflicting mapping of emotional intensity, according to which people associate more intense emotions with the right and less intense emotions with the left — regardless of (...)
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  • Cultural Differences in Attention: Eye Movement Evidence From a Comparative Visual Search Task.Albandri Alotaibi, Geoffrey Underwood & Alastair D. Smith - 2017 - Consciousness and Cognition 55:254-265.