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  1. Is Global Poverty a Philosophical Problem?Sylvia Berryman - 2019 - Metaphilosophy 50 (4):405-420.
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  • Cholera and Nothing More.M. R. Hunt - 2010 - Public Health Ethics 3 (1):55-59.
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  • Defining the Limits of Emergency Humanitarian Action: Where, and How, to Draw the Line?N. Ford, R. Zachariah, E. Mills & R. Upshur - 2010 - Public Health Ethics 3 (1):68-71.
    Decisions about targeting medical assistance in humanitarian contexts are fraught with dilemmas ranging from non-availability of basic services, to massive demographic and epidemiological shifts, and to the threat of insecurity and evacuations. Aid agencies are obliged, due to capacity constraints and competing priorities, to clearly define the objectives and the beneficiaries of their actions. That aid agencies have to set limits to their actions is not controversial, but the process of defining the limits raises ethical questions. In MSF, frameworks for (...)
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  • 'Playing God Because You Have To': Health Professionals' Narratives of Rationing Care in Humanitarian and Development Work.C. Sinding, L. Schwartz, M. Hunt, L. Redwood-Campbell, L. Elit & J. Ranford - 2010 - Public Health Ethics 3 (2):147-156.
    This article explores the accounts of Canadian-trained health professionals working in humanitarian and development organizations who considered not treating a patient or group of patients because of resource limitations. In the narratives, not treating the patient(s) was sometimes understood as the right thing to do, and sometimes as wrong. In analyzing participants’ narratives we draw attention to how medications and equipment are represented. In one type of narrative, medications and equipment are represented primarily as scarce resources; in another, they are (...)
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  • Two Models in Global Health Ethics.Christopher Lowry & Udo Schüklenk - 2009 - Public Health Ethics 2 (3):276-284.
    This paper examines two strategies aimed at demonstrating that moral obligations to improve global health exist. The ‘humanitarian model’ stresses that all human beings, regardless of affluence or global location, are fundamentally the same in terms of moral status. This model argues that affluent global citizens’ moral obligations to assist less fortunate ones follow from the desirability of reducing disease and suffering in the world. The ‘political model’ stresses that the lives of the world's rich and poor are inextricably linked (...)
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  • Allocating Resources in Humanitarian Medicine.Samia A. Hurst, Nathalie Mezger & Alex Mauron - 2009 - Public Health Ethics 2 (1):89-99.
    Fair resource allocation in humanitarian medicine is gaining in importance and complexity, but remains insufficiently explored. It raises specific issues regarding non-ideal fairness, global solidarity, legitimacy in non-governmental institutions and conflicts of interest. All would benefit from further exploration. We propose that some headway could be made by adapting existing frameworks of procedural fairness for use in humanitarian organizations. Despite the difficulties in applying it to humanitarian medicine, it is possible to partly adapt Daniels and Sabin's ‘Accountability for reasonableness’ to (...)
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