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  1. Confident and Cunning: Negotiator Self-Efficacy Promotes Deception in Negotiations.Joseph P. Gaspar & Maurice E. Schweitzer - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-17.
    Self-confidence is associated with many positive outcomes, and training programs routinely seek to build participants’ self-efficacy. In this article, however, we consider whether self-confidence increases unethical behavior. In a series of studies, we explore the relationship between negotiator self-efficacy—an individual’s confidence in his or her negotiation ability—and the use of deception. We find that individuals high in negotiator self-efficacy are more likely to use deception than individuals low in negotiator self-efficacy. We also find that perceptions of the risk of deception (...)
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  • The Leader as Chief Truth Officer: The Ethical Responsibility of “Managing the Truth” in Organizations.Jean-Philippe Bouilloud, Ghislain Deslandes & Guillaume Mercier - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 157 (1):1-13.
    Our aim is to analyze the position of the leader in relation to the ethical dimension of truth-telling within the organization under his/her control. Based on Michel Foucault’s study of truth-telling, we demonstrate that the role of the leader toward the corporation and the imperative of organizational performance place the leader in an ambiguous position: he/she is obliged to take the lead in “telling the truth” internally and externally, but also to bear the consequences of this “truth-telling” for the organization (...)
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  • How Ethically Would Americans and Chinese Negotiate? The Effect of Intra-Cultural Versus Inter-Cultural Negotiations.Yu Yang, David De Cremer & Chao Wang - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 145 (3):659-670.
    A growing body of research has started to examine how individuals from different countries may differ in their use of ethically questionable tactics during business negotiations. Whereas prior research focused on the main effect of the national culture or nationality of the negotiator, we add a new factor, which is the nationality of the counterpart. Looking at both these variables allows us to examine whether and how people may change their likelihood of using ethically questionable tactics in inter-cultural negotiations as (...)
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  • East–West Differences in “Tricky” Tactics: A Comparison of the Tactical Preferences of Chinese and Australian Negotiators. [REVIEW]Cheryl Rivers & Roger Volkema - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 115 (1):17-31.
    How do Eastern and Western perceptions of “tricky” or ethically ambiguous negotiation tactics differ? We address this question by comparing 161 Chinese and 146 Australian participants’ ratings of the appropriateness of different types of negotiation tactics. We predict that their differing cultural values (e.g., individualism/collectivism, importance of face) as well as their different implicit theories of how negotiation ought to be conducted (i.e., mental models, such as captured in The Secret Art of War: The 36 Stratagems) will be salient in (...)
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  • Ethno‐Cultural Considerations in Negotiation: Pretense, Deception and Lies in the Greek Workplace.Abraham Stefanidis & Moshe Banai - 2014 - Business Ethics: A European Review 23 (2):197-217.
    A retrospect into ethos, this study examines the impact of individualism, collectivism, ethical idealism and interpersonal trust on negotiators' attitudes toward questionable negotiation tactics in Greece. A thousand survey questionnaires were administered to Greek employees, of which 327 usable responses were collected. Our findings empirically corroborated a classification of three groups of negotiation tactics, namely, pretense, deception and lies. Individualism–collectivism and ethical idealism were found to be related, and interpersonal trust was found to be unrelated, to attitudes toward questionable negotiation (...)
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  • Collateral Damage From the Show: Emotional Labor and Unethical Behavior.Michelle C. Hong, Christopher M. Barnes & Brent A. Scott - 2017 - Business Ethics Quarterly 27 (4):513-540.
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  • Guilt, Shame, and Reparative Behavior: The Effect of Psychological Proximity. [REVIEW]Majid Ghorbani, Yuan Liao, Sinan Çayköylü & Masud Chand - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 114 (2):311-323.
    Research has paid scant attention to reparative behavior to compensate for unintended wrongdoing or to the role of emotions in doing the right thing. We propose a new approach to investigating reparative behavior by looking at moral emotions and psychological proximity. In this study, we compare the effects of moral emotions (guilt and shame) on the level of compensation for financial harm. We also investigate the role of transgressors’ perceived psychological proximity to the victims of wrongdoing. Our hypotheses were tested (...)
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  • Unethical Behavior in Organizations: Empirical Findings That Challenge CSR and Egoism Theory.Jeffrey Overall - 2016 - Business Ethics: A European Review 25 (2):113-127.
    In the egoism philosophical framework, it is contended that when organizations focus on their long-term interests, they, without knowing it, advance the interests of society as a whole, which is perceived as ethical. In this research, this premise is challenged using data collected from the social media outlets of 29 randomly selected companies from the 2013 Fortune 500 list. Through qualitative comparative analysis, the exact opposite was found. In fact, the organizations that focused on striving for their long-term success are (...)
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  • Attitudes Toward Ethically Questionable Negotiation Tactics: A Two-Country Study.Moshe Banai, Abraham Stefanidis, Ana Shetach & Mehmet Ferhat Özbek - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 123 (4):669-685.
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