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Social Epistemology

Noûs 25 (5):732-733 (1991)

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  1. Philosophy as Undogmatic Procedure: Is Perfect Knowledge Good Enough?Stratos Ramoglou - 2013 - Philosophy of Management 12 (1):7-15.
    In the effort to defend and demonstrate the role of philosophy as an activity aiming at uncovering and questioning dogmas underlying our cognitive practices, the present article places under critical scrutiny the epistemic axiology informing organisation/management studies. That is, the plausibility of the largely unquestioned presumption that it is only the quest for truth that matters. This critical endeavour is effected by juxtaposing the conditions under which this would be the case, and in the prism of present conditions concludes that (...)
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  • Naturalizing the Essential Tension.Fred D'Agostino - 2008 - Synthese 162 (2):275 - 308.
    Kuhn’s “essential tension” between conservative and innovative imperatives in enquiry has an empirical analogue—between the potential benefits of collectivization of enquiry and the social dynamic impediments to effective sharing of information and insights in collective settings. A range of empirical materials from social psychology and organization theory are considered which bear on the issue of balancing these opposing forces and an institution is described in which they are balanced in a way which is appropriate for collective knowledge production.
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  • When is Consensus Knowledge Based? Distinguishing Shared Knowledge From Mere Agreement.Boaz Miller - 2013 - Synthese 190 (7):1293-1316.
    Scientific consensus is widely deferred to in public debates as a social indicator of the existence of knowledge. However, it is far from clear that such deference to consensus is always justified. The existence of agreement in a community of researchers is a contingent fact, and researchers may reach a consensus for all kinds of reasons, such as fighting a common foe or sharing a common bias. Scientific consensus, by itself, does not necessarily indicate the existence of shared knowledge among (...)
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  • A Parting Shot at Misunderstanding: Fuller Vs. Kuhn: Steve Fuller, Kuhn Vs. Popper: The Struggle for the Soul of Science. Cambridge: Icon Books; Crows Nest, NSW: Allen & Unwin, 2003. Pp. 227. £9.99, A$29.95 HB. [REVIEW]David Mercer, Jerry Ravetz, Stephen P. Turner & Steve Fuller - 2004 - Metascience 14 (1):3-152.
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  • Epistemology Socialized: Adrian Haddock, Alan Millar, and Duncan Pritchard : Social Epistemology. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2010, Xviii+350pp, £45.00 HB. [REVIEW]Jeroen de Ridder - 2012 - Metascience 21 (2):477-481.
    Epistemology socialized Content Type Journal Article Pages 1-5 DOI 10.1007/s11016-011-9579-4 Authors Jeroen de Ridder, Faculty of Philosophy, VU University Amsterdam, De Boelelaan 1105, 1081 HV Amsterdam, The Netherlands Journal Metascience Online ISSN 1467-9981 Print ISSN 0815-0796.
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  • The Art of Being Human: A Project for General Philosophy of Science. [REVIEW]Steve Fuller - 2012 - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 43 (1):113-123.
    Throughout the medieval and modern periods, in various sacred and secular guises, the unification of all forms of knowledge under the rubric of ‘science’ has been taken as the prerogative of humanity as a species. However, as our sense of species privilege has been called increasingly into question, so too has the very salience of ‘humanity’ and ‘science’ as general categories, let alone ones that might bear some essential relationship to each other. After showing how the ascendant Stanford School in (...)
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  • Why Practice Does Not Make Perfect: Some Additional Support for Turner‘s Social Theory of Practices. [REVIEW]Steve Fuller - 1997 - Human Studies 20 (3):315-323.
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  • Nature and the Social Sciences: Examples From the Electricity and Waste Sectors.Mikael Klintman - unknown
    The book has two interrelated objectives. One objective is meta-theoretical and concerns the exploration of theoretical debates connected to issues of studying society and environmental problems; another objective is empirical/analytical, referring to the analysis of "green" public participation in the electricity and waste sectors in Sweden, and partly in the Netherlands as well as the UK. The metatheoretical part draws the conclusion that the ontology of critical realism, combined with a problem-subjectivist tenet, is a particularly fruitful basis for the social (...)
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  • Growth of Knowledge: Dual Institutionalization of Disciplines and Brokerage.Fred D'Agostino - forthcoming - Synthese.
    Normal science involves persistent collective application of an agreed research agenda. Anomaly can threaten normal science, but so too can “undue persistence” in that agenda by a normal science peer group. We consider how “undue persistence” might be a collective effect of the common incentive structure that individual members of the peer group typically face in relation to their careers. To understand how “undue persistence” might be ameliorated, we consider the affordances of a peer’s membership of a departmental collegium, organized (...)
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  • Some Notes on the Nature of Methodological Indeterminacy.Steven I. Miller & Marcel Fredericks - 1991 - Synthese 88 (3):359 - 378.
    This paper is an attempt to extend the meaning of the concept of indeterminacy for the human sciences. The authors do this by coining the term methodological indeterminacy and arguing that indeterminacy is better understood when linked to specific methodological techniques. Paradoxically, while specific research techniques demonstrate that the issue of indeterminacy is complex, yielding the possibility of types and degrees, it does not eliminate the problem of translation first raised by Quine. However, the authors go on to argue that, (...)
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  • The Process of Science.Steve Fuller - 1990 - Erkenntnis 33 (1):121-129.
  • Is Trust an Epistemological Notion?Gloria Origgi - 2004 - Episteme 1 (1):61-72.
    Although there is widespread agreement that our epistemic dependence on other people's knowledge is a key ingredient of our cognitive life, the role of trust in this dependence is much more open to debate. Is trust in epistemic authority—or “epistemic trust” for short—an epistemological notion in any sense, or is it simply a bridge-concept that connects our epistemological concerns to moral issues? Should we depict it in terms of the more familiar sociological notion of trust as a basis for cooperation?
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  • 1916 and All That: The Tale of Two Titans.Steve Fuller - 1991 - Knowledge and Policy 4 (4):79-84.
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  • Indeterminacy, Empirical Evidence, and Methodological Pluralism.Joseph Rouse - 1991 - Synthese 86 (3):443 - 465.
    Roth (1987) effectively distinguishes Quinean indeterminacy of translation from the more general underdetermination of theories by showing how indeterminacy follows directly from holism and the role of a shared environment in language learning. However, Roth is mistaken in three further consequences he draws from his interpretation of indeterminacy. Contra Roth, natural science and social science are not differentiated as offering theories about the shared environment and theories about meanings respectively; the role of the environment in language learning does not justify (...)
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  • The Roles of User/Producer Hybrids in the Production of Translational Science.Conor M. W. Douglas, Bryn Lander, Cory Fairley & Janet Atkinson-Grosjean - 2015 - Social Epistemology 29 (3):323-343.
    This paper explores the interface between users and producers of translational science through three case studies. It argues that effective TS requires a breakdown between user and producer roles: users become producers and producers become users. In making this claim, we challenge conventional understandings of TS as well as linear models of innovation. Policy-makers and funders increasingly expect TS and its associated socioeconomic benefits to occur when funding scientific research. We argue that a better understanding of the hybridity between users (...)
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  • Groups as Epistemic Communities: Social Forces and Affect as Antecedents to Knowledge.Miika Vähämaa - 2013 - Social Epistemology 27 (1):3 - 20.
    (2013). Groups as Epistemic Communities: Social Forces and Affect as Antecedents to Knowledge. Social Epistemology: Vol. 27, No. 1, pp. 3-20. doi: 10.1080/02691728.2012.760660.
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  • "They Just Don't Get It!" When Family Disagrees with Expert Opinion.A. Ho - 2009 - Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (8):497-501.
    The notions of “expert” and “expertise” imply that some people have more credibility than others on certain matters. While expert authority is often taken for granted, there are questions as to whether expert power in some cases can be a form of epistemic oppression. Informed by bedside disagreements between family and clinicians as well as feminist discussions of epistemic oppression, this paper argues for a commitment to epistemic humility and the adoption of a two-way collaborative approach between clinicians and families (...)
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  • Primazia da Democracia E Autonomia da Ciência: O Pensamento de Feyerabend No Contexto Dos Science Studies.André Luis Mendonça, Priscila Araújo & Antonio Augusto Videira - 2010 - Filosofia Unisinos 11 (1):44-61.
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  • Argumentation Theory and the Recent Philosophy of Science.William Rehg - unknown
    The thesis of my paper is that argumentation theory provides a promising heuristic framework for addressing issues raised by the rationality debates in the philosophy of science, in particular the issues connected with scientific controversies over the appraisal and choice of competing theories. The first part of the paper grounds this thesis historically. In criticizing the logical empiricists, Thomas Kuhn set the stage for the subsequent opposition between a normative, anti-sociological philosophy of science and a descriptive, anti-philosophical sociology of knowledge. (...)
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  • Introduction: Social Epistemology and Information Science.Don Fallis - 2002 - Social Epistemology 16 (1):1 – 4.
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  • The Sphere of Critical Thinking in a Post-Epistemic World.Steve Fuller - 1994 - Informal Logic 16 (1).
    Just as political theorists have long argued that democracy is viable only in communities of certain sizes and shapes, perhaps epistemologists should also entertain the idea that knowledge is possible only within certain social parameters-ones which today's world may have exceeded. This is what I mean by the "postepistemic" society. I understand an "epistemic society" in Popperian terms as an environment that fosters the spirit of conjectures and refutations. After castigating analytic philosophers for their failure to see this point, I (...)
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  • Social Epistemology: Theory and Applications: Alvin I. Goldman.Alvin I. Goldman - 2009 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 64:1-18.
    1. Mainstream Epistemology and Social Epistemology Epistemology has had a strongly individualist orientation, at least since Descartes. Knowledge, for Descartes, starts with the fact of one’s own thinking and with oneself as subject of that thinking. Whatever else can be known, it must be known by inference from one’s own mental contents. Achieving such knowledge is an individual, rather than a collective, enterprise. Descartes’s successors largely followed this lead, so the history of epistemology, down to our own time, has been (...)
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  • Competition Among Scientific Disciplines in Cold Nuclear Fusion Research.James W. McAllister - 1992 - Science in Context 5 (1):17-49.
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  • Toward a Philosophy of Science Accounting: A Critical Rendering of Instrumental Rationality.Steve Fuller - 1994 - Science in Context 7 (3):591-621.
  • Mathematical Discourse and Cross‐Disciplinary Communities: The Case of Political Economy.Robert Pahre - 1996 - Social Epistemology 10 (1):55 – 73.
    Abstract This paper explores the role of symbolic languages within and between positivist disciplines. Symbolic languages, of which mathematics is the most important example, consist of tautologically true statements, such as 2 + 2 = 4. These must be operationalized before being useful for positivist research agendas (i.e. two apples and two oranges make four fruit). Disciplines may borrow either the symbolic languages of another discipline or the symbolic language and the accompanying operationalizations. The choice has important theoretical effects, and (...)
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  • ‘Evidence’ as an Idealized Cognitive Model.Steven I. Miller - 1994 - Social Epistemology 8 (2):163 – 175.
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  • Gene‐Talk Talk About Sociobiology.Daniel W. McShea - 1992 - Social Epistemology 6 (2):183 – 192.
  • “Please, Don’T Let Me Be Misunderstood”: The Role of Argumentation in a Sociology of Academic Misunderstandings.Yves Gingras - 2007 - Social Epistemology 21 (4):369 – 389.
    Academic debates are so frequent and omnipresent in most disciplines, particularly the social sciences and humanities, it seems obvious that disagreements are bound to occur. The aim of this paper is to show that whereas the agent who perceives his/her contribution as being misunderstood locates the origin of the communication problem on the side of the receiver who "misinterprets" the text, the emitter is in fact also contributing to the possibility of this misunderstanding through the very manner in which his/her (...)
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  • Local Knowledge and Comparative Scientific Traditions.David Turnbull - 1993 - Knowledge and Policy 6 (3-4):29-54.
  • Social Epistemology as a Rhetoric of Inquiry.John Lyne - 1994 - Argumentation 8 (2):111-124.
    Fuller's program of social epistemology engages a rhetoric of inquiry that can be usefully compared and contrasted with other discursive theories of knowledge, such as that of Richard Rorty. Resisting the model of “conversation,” Fuller strikes an activist posture and lays the groundwork for normative “knowledge policy,” in which persuasion and credibility play key roles. The image of investigation is one that overtly rejects the “storehouse” conception of knowledge and invokes the metaphors of distributive economics. Productive questions arise as to (...)
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  • Jesse Shera, Social Epistemology and Praxis.John M. Budd - 2002 - Social Epistemology 16 (1):93 – 98.
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  • Social Epistemology, Information Science and Ideology.Archie L. Dick - 2002 - Social Epistemology 16 (1):23 – 35.
    Margaret Egan and Jesse Hauk Shera's original conception of social epistemology has never been defined unambiguously, or developed significantly beyond its early formulation. An interesting consequence of this lack of conceptual clarity has been the application of several interpretations of social epistemology. This article discusses how social epistemology was linked with the ideology of apartheid, and with racially segregated library and information services in the Republic of South Africa. In a fraudulent scientific vision for librarianship, social epistemology was assigned a (...)
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  • Goldman and the Foundations of Social Epistemology.J. Angelo Corlett - 1994 - Argumentation 8 (2):145-156.
    This essay argues that Alvin I. Goldman's truth-linked theory of group knowledge (veritism) omits individual components of social cognition, that all group based theories of knowledge lead to scepticism, and that if any sense is to be made of social knowledge, it must be done on individualist lines. I argue that Goldman's veritism can be reconstructed by adopting a reliabilist theory,social reliabilism. And I argue that Goldman's objections to a particular sort of consensualism are not telling. So there are now (...)
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  • Mead has Never Been Modern: Using Meadian Theory to Extend the Constructionist Study of Technology.Antony J. Puddephatt - 2005 - Social Epistemology 19 (4):357 – 380.
    This article makes use of the theoretical framework of George Herbert Mead to extend the parameters of the constructionist study of technology, which is shown to suffer from two major weaknesses. First, the perspective is based upon a dualist ontology, which tends toward a solipsistic position. Second, the constructionist approach is sociologically deterministic, and fails to fully capture innovation and creativity in the technological process. Mead's ontology can serve to remedy these issues, as his theory of meaning rests on a (...)
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  • The Supplementary Clerk: Social Epistemology as a Vocation.Thomas Basbøll - 2012 - Social Epistemology 26 (3-4):435-451.
    The production and circulation of scholarly texts have long been at the center of the theoretical concerns of social epistemologists. In this essay, Foucault?s notion of an ?archive,? a set of practices that operates between the corpus and the language to produce ?statements,? is used to identify a site for a practicing (as distinct from theorizing) social epistemologist. By supporting the efforts of researchers to publish their work, and hence participate in the conversations that define their area of expertise, social (...)
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  • Could Gambling Save Science? Encouraging an Honest Consensus.Robin Hanson - 1995 - Social Epistemology 9 (1):3-33.
    The pace of scientific progress may be hindered by the tendency of our academic institutions to reward being popular rather than being right. A market-based alternative, where scientists can more formally 'stake their reputation', is presented here. It offers clear incentives to be careful and honest while contributing to a visible, self-consistent consensus on controversial scientific questions. In addition, it allows patrons to choose questions to be researched without choosing people or methods. The bulk of this paper is spent in (...)
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  • Gene Talk in Sociobiology.Henry Howe & John Lyne - 1992 - Social Epistemology 6 (2):109 – 163.
    Abstract Terminology within the biological sciences gets its import not just from semantic meaning, but also from the way it functions within the rhetorics of the various disciplinary practices. The ?sociobiology? of human behavior inherits three distinct rhetorics from the genetic disciplines. Sociobiologists use population genetic, biometrical genetic, and molecular genetic rhetorics, without acknowledging the conceptual and experimental constraints that are assumed by geneticists. The eclectic blending of these three rhetorics obscures important differences of context and meaning. Sociobiologists use foundational (...)
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  • Social Epistemology, Scientific Practice and the Elusive Social.Brian S. Baigrie - 1994 - Argumentation 8 (2):125-144.
    Social Epistemology, as formulated by Steve Fuller, is based on the suggestion that rational knowledge policy must be held accountable to ‘brute facts’ about the nature of our human cognitive pursuits, whatever these may be. One difficulty for Fuller concerns the conception of the social which underwrites social epistemology. I argue that social epistemology conflates the social with human psychological properties that are available for public scrutiny and, accordingly, that social epistemology is best viewed as a brand of psychologism. Though (...)
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  • Cross-Cultural Epistemic Practices.Soraj Hongladarom - 2002 - Social Epistemology 16 (1):83 – 92.
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  • The Social Epistemologist in Search of a Position From Which to Argue.Steve Fuller - 1994 - Argumentation 8 (2):163-183.
    The relevance of Fuller's version of social epistemology to argumentation theory is highlighted, in response to critics who claim that I am not sufficiently critical of the social grounds of knowledge production. Responding to Lyne, I first consider the strengths and weaknesses of relying on economic images to capture the social. Then, I tackle two contrary objections: Brian Baigrie claims social epistemology is “not social enough,” while Angelo Corlett wonders whether it may be “too social.” Finally, I counter Malcolm Ashmore, (...)
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  • Introduction: Education, Social Epistemology and Virtue Epistemology.Ben Kotzee - 2013 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 47 (2):157-167.
  • The Interplay of Psychology and Mathematics Education: From the Attraction of Psychology to the Discovery of the Social.Karen François, Kathleen Coessens & Jean Paul Van Bendegem - 2012 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 46 (3):370-385.
    It is a rather safe statement to claim that the social dimensions of the scientific process are accepted in a fair share of studies in the philosophy of science. It is a somewhat safe statement to claim that the social dimensions are now seen as an essential element in the understanding of what human cognition is and how it functions. But it would be a rather unsafe statement to claim that the social is fully accepted in the philosophy of mathematics. (...)
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  • Habermas and the Force of Dialectical Argument.Mary Hesse - 1995 - History of European Ideas 21 (3):367-378.
    In his theory of rational discourse, Habermas has made essential use of the concept of 'force of the better argument'. He does not explicitly discuss the theories of meaning and of inference that must underpin this concept, but usually construes it in terms of univocal meaning and propositional inference. These assumptions are challenged by means of examples from the use of metaphor and analogical argument in science, and it is suggested that a generalisation of such arguments applies to philosophical discourse (...)
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  • The Logic of Intervention in Knowledge Production.Osamu Kanamori - 1999 - Social Epistemology 13 (3 & 4):263 – 267.
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  • Science Education as an Exercise in Foreign Affairs.William W. Cobern - 1995 - Science & Education 4 (3):287-302.
  • Realism, Relativism, and Naturalized Meta-Epistemology.James Maffie - 1993 - Metaphilosophy 24 (1-2):1-13.
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  • Toward a Social Psychology of Science.Serge Moscovici - 1993 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 23 (4):343-374.
  • Social Epistemology: A Quarter-Century Itinerary.Steve Fuller - 2012 - Social Epistemology 26 (3-4):267-283.
    Examining the origin and development of my views of social epistemology, I contrast my position with the position held by analytic social epistemologists. Analytic social epistemology (ASE) has failed to make significant progress owing, in part, to a minimal understanding of actual knowledge practices, a minimised role for philosophers in ongoing inquiry, and a focus on maintaining the status quo of epistemology as a field. As a way forward, I propose questions and future areas of inquiry for a post-ASE to (...)
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  • Social Knowing: The Social Sense of 'Scientific Knowledge'.Alexander Bird - 2010 - Philosophical Perspectives 24 (1):23-56.
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  • What is Social About Social Epistemics?James Maffie - 1991 - Social Epistemology 5 (2):101 – 110.