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Social Epistemology

Erkenntnis 33 (1):131-135 (1990)

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  1. Philosophy as Undogmatic Procedure: Is Perfect Knowledge Good Enough?Stratos Ramoglou - 2013 - Philosophy of Management 12 (1):7-15.
    In the effort to defend and demonstrate the role of philosophy as an activity aiming at uncovering and questioning dogmas underlying our cognitive practices, the present article places under critical scrutiny the epistemic axiology informing organisation/management studies. That is, the plausibility of the largely unquestioned presumption that it is only the quest for truth that matters. This critical endeavour is effected by juxtaposing the conditions under which this would be the case, and in the prism of present conditions concludes that (...)
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  • Max Weber on Science, in the Context of Our Days Thinking.Lyudmila A. Markova - 2020 - Russian Journal of Philosophical Sciences 63 (8):56-71.
    Max Weber analyzes the science of the Modern Period. The revolution in physics at the beginning of the 20th century, the creation of quantum mechanics bring to the fore another type of scientific thinking. It is important to note that past knowledge in this case is not refuted, not destroyed, it becomes marginal and enters into communication with its competitor. It is this type of communication with Weber’s philosophy of scientific thinking that helps us to understand its specificity. According to (...)
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  • For A Service Conception of Epistemic Authority: A Collective Approach.Michel Croce - 2019 - Social Epistemology (2):1-11.
    This paper attempts to provide a remedy to a surprising lacuna in the current discussion in the epistemology of expertise, namely the lack of a theory accounting for the epistemic authority of collective agents. After introducing a service conception of epistemic authority based on Alvin Goldman’s account of a cognitive expert, I argue that this service conception is well suited to account for the epistemic authority of collective bodies on a non-summativist perspective, and I show in detail how the defining (...)
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  • The Metaphysical Standing of the Human: A Future for the History of the Human Sciences.Steve Fuller - 2019 - History of the Human Sciences 32 (1):23-40.
    I reconstruct my own journey into the history of the human sciences, which I show to have been a process of discovering the metaphysical standing of the human. I begin with Alexandre Koyré’s encounter with Edmund Husserl in the 1930s, which I use to throw light on the legacy of Kant’s ‘anthropological’ understanding of the human, which dominated and limited 19th-century science. As I show, those who broke from Kant’s strictures and set the stage for the 20th-century revolutions in science (...)
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  • Fuller's Project of Humanity: Social Sciences or Sociobiology.Francis Remedios - 2009 - History of the Human Sciences 22 (2):115-129.
  • Fuller's Project of Humanity: Social Sciences or Sociobiology?: Steve Fuller, The New Sociological Imagination. London: Sage Publications, 2006.Francis Remedios - 2009 - History of the Human Sciences 22 (2):115-120.
  • Review Symposium on John R. Searle: John R. Searle, The Construction of Social Reality. London: Allen Lane, 1995. Xviii + 241 Pp. £20.00, ISBN 0-713-99112-7.Ian Hacking - 1997 - History of the Human Sciences 10 (4):83-92.
  • Between Kin Selection and Cultural Relativism: Cultural Evolution and the Origin of Inequality.William T. Lynch - 2019 - Perspectives on Science 27 (2):278-315.
    One way to interpret the significance of the "Kuhnian revolution" in the history and philosophy of science is as implying that successful scientific theories are complex cultural adaptations. Like the complex cultural practices studied by anthropologists in traditional societies, scientific paradigms are the result of cultural evolution and come as a package that functions well for guiding the practice of a scientific community, but that cannot be taken apart into discrete truth claims that are tested directly against nature. A complex (...)
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  • The Janus Head of Bachelard’s Phenomenotechnique: From Purification to Proliferation and Back.Massimiliano Simons - 2017 - European Journal for Philosophy of Science 8 (3):689-707.
    The work of Gaston Bachelard is known for two crucial concepts, that of the epistemological rupture and that of phenomenotechnique. A crucial question is, however, how these two concepts relate to one another. Are they in fact essentially connected or must they be seen as two separate elements of Bachelard’s thinking? This paper aims to analyse the relation between these two Bachelardian moments and the significance of the concept of phenomenotechnique for today. This will be done by examining how the (...)
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  • Science Studies Goes Public: A Report on an Ongoing Performance.Steve Fuller - 2008 - Spontaneous Generations 2 (1):11.
    I believe that tenured historians, philosophers, and sociologists of science—when presented with the opportunity—have a professional obligation to get involved in public controversies over what should count as science. I stress ‘tenured’ because the involved academics need to be materially protected from the consequences of their involvement, given the amount of misrepresentation and abuse that is likely to follow, whatever position they take. Indeed, the institution of academic tenure justifies itself most clearly in such heat-seeking situations, where one may appear (...)
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  • Thinking the Unthinkable as a Radical Scientific Project.Steve Fuller - 2010 - Critical Review 22 (4):397-413.
    Philip Tetlock underestimates the import of his own Expert Political Judgment. It is much more than a critical scientific evaluation of the accuracy and consistency of political pundits. It also offers a blueprint for challenging expertise more generally-in the name of scientific advancement. “Thinking the unthinkable”-a strategy Tetlock employs when he gets experts to consider counterfactual scenarios that are far from their epistemic comfort zones-has had explosive consequences historically for both knowledge and morality by extending our sense of what is (...)
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  • Steve Fuller and Intelligent Design.Jeremy Shearmur - 2010 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 40 (3):433-445.
    This essay offers a critical introduction to the intellectual issues involved in the Kitzmiller case relating to intelligent design, and to Steve Fuller’s involvement in it. It offers a brief appraisal of the intelligent design movement stemming from the work of Phillip E. Johnson, and of Steve Fuller’s case for intelligent design in a rather different sense.
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  • Economics Imperialism in Social Epistemology: A Critical Assessment.Manuela Fernández Pinto - 2016 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 46 (5):443-472.
    Expanding on recent philosophical contributions to the conceptual and normative framework of scientific imperialism, I examine whether the economics approach to social epistemology can be considered a case of economics imperialism and determine whether economics’ explanatory expansionism appropriately contributes to this philosophical subfield or not. I argue first that the economics approach to social epistemology counts as a case of economics imperialism under a broad conception of the term, and second that we have good reasons to doubt the appropriateness of (...)
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  • Critical Science Studies as Argumentation Theory: Who’s Afraid of SSK?William Rehg - 2000 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 30 (1):33-48.
    This article asks whether an interdisciplinary "critical science studies" (CSS) is possible between a critical theory in the Frankfurt School tradition, with its commitment to universal standards of reason, and relativistic sociologies of scientific knowledge (e.g., David Bloor's strong programme). It is argued that CSS is possible if its practitioners adopt the epistemological equivalent of Rawls's method of avoidance. A discriminating, public policy–relevant critique of science can then proceed on the basis of an argumentation theory that employs an immanent standard (...)
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  • Kuhnenstein: Or, the Importance of Being Read.Steve Fuller - 2005 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 35 (4):480-498.
    I respond to Rupert Read's highly critical review of my Kuhn vs Popper: The Struggle for the Soul Science . In contrast to my pro-Popper take on the debate, Read promotes a Wittgenstein-inflected Kuhn, whom I dub "Kuhnenstein." Kuhnenstein is largely the figment of Read's—and others'—fertile philosophical imagination as channeled through scholastic philosophical practice. Contra Read, I argue that Kuhnenstein provides not only a poor basis for social epistemology but Kuhnenstein's prominence itself exemplifies a poor social epistemology for philosophy. Nevertheless, (...)
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  • Optimizing Reasonableness, Critical Thinking, and Cyberspace.Polycarp Ikuenobe - 2003 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 35 (4):407-424.
  • Toward Pragmatist Methodological Relationalism: From Philosophizing Sociology to Sociologizing Philosophy.Osmo Kivinen & Tero Piiroinen - 2006 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 36 (3):303-329.
    University of Turku, Finland In this article, relationalist approaches to social sciences are analyzed in terms of a conceptual distinction between "philosophizing sociology" and "sociologizing philosophy." These mark two different attitudes toward philosophical metaphysics and ontological commitments. The authors’ own pragmatist methodological relationalism of Deweyan origin is compared with ontologically committed realist approaches, as well as with Bourdieuan methodological relationalism. It is argued that pragmatist philosophy of social sciences is an appropriate tool for assisting social scientists in their methodological work, (...)
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  • Ciencia, Inconmensurabilidad Y Reglas: Crítica a Thomas Kuhn.Cristian Santibáñez Yáñez - 2008 - Revista de filosofía (Chile) 64.
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  • The Rationalitätstreit Revisited: A Note on Roth’s “Methodological Pluralism”.Steven I. Miller - 1999 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 29 (3):339-353.
    Roth's analysis of the Rationalitätstreit (i.e., the debate(s) about rationality) stands as one of the major works on how the debate affects a wide range of issues in the philosophy of science and the social sciences. His principal thesis is that the debate may be seen as a series of Quine-type "translation manuals," exhibiting characteristics of paradigms (following Kuhn 1970) that can be treated as testable scientific theories by adequate empirical tests. The author argues that Roth's notion of empirically testing (...)
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  • Hierarchy of Scientific Consensus and the Flow of Dissensus Over Time.Kyung-Man Kim - 1996 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 26 (1):3-25.
    During the last few years, several sociological accounts of scientific consensus appeared in which a radically skeptical view of cognitive consensus in science was advocated. Challenging the traditional realist conception of scientific consensus as a sui generis social fact, the radical skeptics claim to have shown that the traditional historical sociologist's supposedly definitive account of scientific consensus is only a linguistic chimera that easily can be deconstructed by the application of different interpretive schema to the given data. I will argue (...)
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  • The Ghost of Wittgenstein: Forms of Life, Scientific Method, and Cultural Critique.William T. Lynch - 2005 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 35 (2):139-174.
    In developing an "internal" sociology of science, the sociology of scientific knowledge drew on Wittgenstein’s later philosophy to reinterpret traditional epistemological topics in sociological terms. By construing scientific reasoning as rule following within a collective, sociologists David Bloor and Harry Collins effectively blocked outside criticism of a scientific field, whether scientific, philosophical, or political. Ethnomethodologist Michael Lynch developed an alternative, Wittgensteinian reading that similarly blocked philosophical or political critique, while also disallowing analytical appeals to historical or institutional contexts. I criticize (...)
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  • “Repressive Tolerance”: Herbert Marcuse’s Exercise in Social Epistemology.Rodney Fopp - 2010 - Social Epistemology 24 (2):105-122.
    When Herbert Marcuse's essay entitled “Repressive tolerance” was published in the mid-1960s it was trenchantly criticised because it was anti-democratic and defied the academic canon of value neutrality. Yet his argument is attracting renewed interest in the 21st century, particularly when, post 9/11, the thresholds or limits of tolerance are being contested. This article argues that Marcuse's original essay was concerned to problematise the dominant social understandings of tolerance at the time, which were more about insisting that individual citizens tolerate (...)
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  • Bullshit as a Problem of Social Epistemology.Joshua Wakeham - 2017 - Sociological Theory 35 (1):15-38.
    Bullshit is a widely recognized problem. While philosophy has given the topic some consideration, the analysis it offers is limited by an individualistic understanding of knowledge and epistemology. This article reframes bullshit as a problem of social epistemology, drawing on philosophical work on social epistemology as well as related research in psychology and the sociology of knowledge to explore the problem of epistemic vigilance. The article then draws on interactional sociology as well as Glaeser’s recent work on understanding and institutions (...)
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  • Book Review: Knowledge. The Philosophical Quest in History, by Steve FullerFullerSteveKnowledge. The Philosophical Quest in History, New York, NY, Routledge, 2015. 304 Pp., $54.95, ISBN 9781844658183. [REVIEW]Iván E. Gómez-Aguilar - 2017 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 47 (1):86-92.
  • Response to Lynch: Fuller Transformed—Back to the USSR.Francis Remedios & Val Dusek - 2018 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 48 (5):524-529.
    Remedios’s and Dusek’s response to Lynch’s review is that Lynch misreads Fuller on knowledge and misdirects his criticism of Fuller’s turn to agency.
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  • After the Gold Rush: Cleaning Up After Steve Fuller’s Theosis.William T. Lynch - 2018 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 48 (5):505-523.
    Remedios and Dusek have provided a useful contextualization of Steve Fuller’s recent work in social epistemology. While they have provided some good criticisms of some of Fuller’s new ideas, they fail to provide a systematic critique of Fuller’s retreat from a naturalistic and materialist social epistemology for one embracing transhumanism, intelligent design, and the proactionary imperative. An alternative approach is developed, drawing on Fuller’s early work and incorporating recent work on our biological and cultural evolution as a species.
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  • Going Full Circle in the Sociology of Knowledge: Comment on Lynch and Fuhrman.Michael Lynch - 1992 - Science, Technology and Human Values 17 (2):228-233.
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  • Recovering and Expanding the Normative: Marx and the New Sociology of Scientific Knowledge.Ellsworth R. Fuhrman & William T. Lynch - 1991 - Science, Technology and Human Values 16 (2):233-248.
    It was customary in traditional approaches to the sociology of knowledge to bracket either questions about the possibility of the social determination of natural scientific ideas or questions about the ability of the sociology of knowledge to evaluate other types of knowledge claims. The current strong program in the sociology of knowledge, a typical representative of the new approach to the sociology of science, wants to study the production of natural scientific knowledge scientifically and simultaneously bracket normative considerations. We criticize (...)
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  • Book Reviews : Philosophy, Rhetoric, and the End of Knowledge: The Coming of Science and Technology Studies, by Steve Fuller. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 1993, 421 + Xxii Pp. $54.00 (Cloth); $22.50 (Paper. [REVIEW]Warren Schmaus - 1994 - Science, Technology and Human Values 19 (4):526-528.
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  • Engineering Practice and Engineering Ethics.Ronald Kline & William T. Lynch - 2000 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 25 (2):195-225.
    Diane Vaughan’s analysis of the causes of the Challenger accident suggests ways to apply science and technology studies to the teaching of engineering ethics. By sensitizing future engineers to the ongoing construction of risk during mundane engineering practice, we can better prepare them to address issues of public health, safety, and welfare before they require heroic intervention. Understanding the importance of precedents, incremental change, and fallible engineering judgment in engineering design may help them anticipate potential threats to public safety arising (...)
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  • Review Essay : The Turn Toward Society? Social Reconstruction of Science. [REVIEW]E. J. Woodhouse - 1991 - Science, Technology and Human Values 16 (3):390-404.
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  • When Math Worlds Collide: Intention and Invention in Ethnomathematics.Ron Eglash - 1997 - Science, Technology and Human Values 22 (1):79-97.
    Ethnomathematics is a relatively new discipline that investigates mathematical knowl edge in small-scale, indigenous cultures. This essay locates ethnomathematics as one of five distinct subfields within a general anthropology of mathematics and describes interactions between cultural and epistemological features that have created these divisions. It reviews the political and pedagogical issues in which ethnomathematics research and practice is immersed and examines the possibilities for both conflict and collaboration with the goals, theories, and methods of social constructivism.
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  • Technology Theory and Deliberative Democracy.Patrick W. Hamlett - 2003 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 28 (1):112-140.
    This article examines the debate about the normative relevance of social constructivism, arguing that the criticisms of Winner, Radder, and others are fundamentally accurate. The article argues that a combination of Radder's notion of nonlocal values and Martin's concern for deliberative interventions may offer a theoretical exit from the normative irrelevance that marks constructivism. The article goes on to suggest that theoretical and praxeological developments in two other literatures, participatory public policy analysis and deliberative democracy, may provide fruitful initiatives for (...)
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  • Book Review : Shaping Written Knowledge: The Genre and Activity of the Experimental Article in Science, by Charles Bazerman. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press, 1988. [REVIEW]Steve Fuller - 1991 - Science, Technology and Human Values 16 (1):122-125.
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  • Divining the Future of Social Theory: From Theology to Rhetoric Via Social Epistemology.Steve Fuller - 1998 - European Journal of Social Theory 1 (1):107-126.
    The fertility of contemporary social theory is matched only by its problematic relationship to its past. The future of social theory therefore lies with a renegotiation of that relationship. I begin by unearthing the theological origins of theorizing and its secularization as epistemology in the 19th century. I then provide an account of the recent renaissance in social theory - epitomized by the various `structure-agency' debates - that reveals its intellectual kinship to scholastic theology. I diagnose this scholasticism in terms (...)
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  • Technoscience Rent: Toward a Theory of Rentiership for Technoscientific Capitalism.Kean Birch - 2020 - Science, Technology, and Human Values 45 (1):3-33.
    Contemporary, technoscientific capitalism is characterized by the configuration of a range of “things” as assets or capitalized property. Accumulation strategies have changed as a result of this assetization process. Rather than entrepreneurial strategies based on commodity production, technoscientific capitalism is increasingly underpinned by rentiership or the appropriation of value through ownership and control rights, monopoly conditions, and regulatory or market devices and practices. While rentiership is often presented as a negative phenomenon in both neoclassical and Marxist political economy literatures—and much (...)
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  • What Strong Sociologists Can Learn From Critical Realism: Bloor on the History of Aerodynamics.Christopher Norris - 2014 - Journal of Critical Realism 13 (1):3-37.
    This essay presents a long, detailed, in many ways critical but also appreciative account, of David Bloor’s recent book The Enigma of the Aerofoil. I take that work as the crowning statement of ideas and principles developed over the past four decades by Bloor and other exponents of the ‘strong programme’ in the sociology of scientific knowledge. It therefore offers both a test-case of that approach and a welcome opportunity to review, clarify and extend some of the arguments brought against (...)
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  • Agents and Norms in the New Economics of Science.Stephen M. Downes - 2001 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 31 (2):224-238.
    In this article, the author focuses on Philip Kitcher's and Alvin Goldman's economic models of the social character of scientific knowledge production. After introducing some relevant methodological issues in the social sciences and characterizing Kitcher's and Goldman's models, the author goes on to show that special problems arise directly from the concept of an agent invoked in the models. The author argues that the two distinct concepts of agents, borrowed from economics and cognitive psychology, are inconsistent. Finally, the author discusses (...)
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  • Fuller and Rouse on the Legitimation of Scientific Knowledge.Francis Remedios - 2003 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 33 (4):444-463.
    Fullerand Rouse are both political social epistemologists concerned with the cognitive authority of science, though both disagree on what role it should play in science. Fullerar gues that political factors such as knowledge policy and a constitution play a primary role in the global legitimation of scientific knowledge, while Rouse holds that politics play a role on the local (practices) level but not on the global (metascientific) level of legitimation. While Fullerpr ovides a political response to the legitimation project, Rouse (...)
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  • The Unended Quest for Legitimacy in Science.Steve W. Fuller - 2003 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 33 (4):472-478.
  • Is History and Philosophy of Science Withering on the Vine?Steve Fuller - 1991 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 21 (2):149-174.
    Nearly thirty years after the first stirrings of the Kuhnian revolution, history and philosophy of science continues to galvanize methodological discussions in all corners of the academy except its own. Evidence for this domestic stagnation appears in Warren Schmaus's thoughtful review of Social Epistemology in which Schmaus takes for granted that history of science is the ultimate court of appeal for disputes between philosophers and sociologists. As against this, this essay argues that such disputes may be better treated by experimental (...)
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  • Whither Social Epistemology? A Reply to Fuller.Warren Schmaus - 1991 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 21 (2):196-202.
  • Social Epistemology and the Brave New World of Science and Technology Studies.Steve Fuller - 1991 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 21 (2):232-244.
  • Why Science Studies has Never Been Critical of Science: Some Recent Lessons on How to Be a Helpful Nuisance and a Harmless Radical.Steve Fuller - 2000 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 30 (1):5-32.
    Research in Science and Technology Studies (STS) tends to presume that intellectual and political radicalism go hand in hand. One would therefore expect that the most intellectually radical movement in the field relates critically to its social conditions. However, this is not the case, as demonstrated by the trajectory of the Parisian School of STS spearheaded by Michel Callon and Bruno Latour. Their position, "actor-network theory," turns out to be little more than a strategic adaptation to the democratization of expertise (...)
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  • The Integration of Theological Perspectives in Communication Studies.Juan D. Rogers - 2002 - Transformation: An International Journal of Holistic Mission Studies 19 (4):233-243.
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  • Making Up the Past: A Response to Sharrock and Leudar.Steve Fuller - 2002 - History of the Human Sciences 15 (4):115-123.
  • Beyond Curriculum: Groundwork for a Non-Instrumental Theory of Education.Deborah Osberg & Gert Biesta - 2020 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 53 (1):57-70.
    This paper problematizes current thinking about education by arguing that the question of educational purpose is not simply a socio-political question concerned with what the ends should be and why...
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  • Hypertextual Thoughts.Jordi Vallverdú - 2007 - Revista Portuguesa de Filosofia 63 (1/3):703 - 720.
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  • Competition Among Scientific Disciplines in Cold Nuclear Fusion Research.James W. McAllister - 1992 - Science in Context 5 (1):17-49.
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  • Different Experimental Lives: Michael Faraday and William Sturgeon.Iwan Rhys Morus - 1992 - History of Science 30 (1):1-28.