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  1. The Frankfurt School, Science and Technology Studies, and the Humanities.Finn Collin & David Budtz Pedersen - 2015 - Social Epistemology 29 (1):44-72.
    This paper examines the often overlooked parallels between the critical theory of the German Frankfurt School and Science and Technology Studies in Britain, as an attempt to articulate a critique of science as a social phenomenon. The cultural aspect of the German and British arguments is in focus, especially the role attributed to the humanities in balancing cultural and techno-scientific values in society. Here, we draw parallels between the German argument and the Two Cultures debate in Britain. The third and (...)
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  • Scrutinizing Scientism From a Hermeneutic Point of View.Dimitri Ginev - 2013 - Social Epistemology 27 (1):68 - 89.
    The paper suggests a critique of scientism by revealing the existential genesis of knowledge-constitutive interests in scientific research. This scenario of overcoming scientism is spelled out in terms of the doctrine of cognitive existentialism. On the doctrine?s central claim, a knowledge-constitutive interest is not fixed and determined by a strongly situated epistemic position that is distinguished by invariant norms of theorizing, methodological devices, cognitive aims, goals, and values. In reflecting upon its situated transcendence, scientific research has a potentiality for discarding (...)
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  • Primazia da Democracia E Autonomia da Ciência: O Pensamento de Feyerabend No Contexto Dos Science Studies.André Luis Mendonça, Priscila Araújo & Antonio Augusto Videira - 2010 - Filosofia Unisinos 11 (1):44-61.
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  • The Multidimensionality of Environmental Problems: The GMO Controversy and the Limits of Scientific Materialism.Michael S. Carolan - 2008 - Environmental Values 17 (1):67 - 82.
    This paper argues for a broader understanding of complexity; an understanding that speaks to the multidimensionality of environmental problems. As argued, environmental problems rest upon ontological, epistemological, and moral claims; they rest, in other words, upon statements about what is, knowledge, and what ought to be, respectively. To develop and illustrate this argument, the GMO (genetically modified organism) controversy is broken down according to these three dimensions. Dissecting environmental problems in this manner reveals why we cannot look solely toward the (...)
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  • Peer Production and Collective Intelligence as the Basis for the Public Digital University.Michael A. Peters & Petar Jandrić - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (13):1271-1284.
    This paper reviews two main historical approaches to creativity: the Romanticist approach, based on the culture of the irrational, and the Enlightenment approach, based on the culture of the objective. It defends a paradigm of creativity as a sum of rich semiotic systems that form the basis of distributed knowledge and learning, reviews historical ideas of the university, and identifies two conflicting mainstream models in regards to understanding of the university as a public good: the ‘Public’ University circa 1960–1980, and (...)
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  • How Medical Technologies Shape the Experience of Illness.Bjørn Hofmann & Fredrik Svenaeus - 2018 - Life Sciences, Society and Policy 14 (1):1-11.
    In this article we explore how diagnostic and therapeutic technologies shape the lived experiences of illness for patients. By analysing a wide range of examples, we identify six ways that technology can form the experience of illness. First, technology may create awareness of disease by revealing asymptomatic signs or markers. Second, the technology can reveal risk factors for developing diseases. Third, the technology can affect and change an already present illness experience. Fourth, therapeutic technologies may redefine our experiences of a (...)
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  • Deviant Interdisciplinarity as Philosophical Practice: Prolegomena to Deep Intellectual History.Steve Fuller - 2013 - Synthese 190 (11):1899-1916.
    Philosophy may relate to interdisciplinarity in two distinct ways On the one hand, philosophy may play an auxiliary role in the process of interdisciplinarity, typically through conceptual analysis, in the understanding that the disciplines themselves are the main epistemic players. This version of the relationship I characterise as ‘normal’ because it captures the more common pattern of the relationship, which in turn reflects an acceptance of the division of organized inquiry into disciplines. On the other hand, philosophy may be itself (...)
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  • Complementary Frameworks of Scientific Inquiry: Hypothetico-Deductive, Hypothetico-Inductive, and Observational-Inductive.T. E. Eastman & F. Mahootian - 2009 - World Futures 65 (1):61-75.
    The 20th century philosophy of science began on a positivistic note. Its focal point was scientific explanation and the hypothetico-deductive (HD) framework of explanation was proposed as the standard of what is meant by “science.” HD framework, its inductive and statistical variants, and other logic-based approaches to modeling scientific explanation were developed long before the dawn of the information age. Since that time, the volume of observational data and power of high performance computing have increased by several orders of magnitude (...)
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  • A Social Licence for Science: Capturing the Public or Co-Constructing Research?Sujatha Raman & Alison Mohr - 2014 - Social Epistemology 28 (3-4):258-276.
    The “social licence to operate” has been invoked in science policy discussions including the 2007 Universal Ethical Code for scientists issued by the UK Government Office for Science. Drawing from sociological research on social licence and STS interventions in science policy, the authors explore the relevance of expectations of a social licence for scientific research and scientific contributions to public decision-making, and what might be involved in seeking to create one. The process of seeking a social licence is not the (...)
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  • Social Epistemology: A Quarter-Century Itinerary.Steve Fuller - 2012 - Social Epistemology 26 (3-4):267-283.
    Examining the origin and development of my views of social epistemology, I contrast my position with the position held by analytic social epistemologists. Analytic social epistemology (ASE) has failed to make significant progress owing, in part, to a minimal understanding of actual knowledge practices, a minimised role for philosophers in ongoing inquiry, and a focus on maintaining the status quo of epistemology as a field. As a way forward, I propose questions and future areas of inquiry for a post-ASE to (...)
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  • The Art of Being Human: A Project for General Philosophy of Science. [REVIEW]Steve Fuller - 2012 - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 43 (1):113-123.
    Throughout the medieval and modern periods, in various sacred and secular guises, the unification of all forms of knowledge under the rubric of ‘science’ has been taken as the prerogative of humanity as a species. However, as our sense of species privilege has been called increasingly into question, so too has the very salience of ‘humanity’ and ‘science’ as general categories, let alone ones that might bear some essential relationship to each other. After showing how the ascendant Stanford School in (...)
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  • The Scope and Multidimensionality of the Scientific Realism Debate.Howard Sankey & Dimitri Ginev - 2011 - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 42 (2):263-283.
    At stake in the classical realism-debate is the clash between realist and anti-realist positions. In recent years, the classical form of this debate has undergone a double transformation. On the one hand, the champions of realism began to pay more attention to the interpretative dimensions of scientific research. On the other hand, anti-realists of various sorts realized that the rejection of the hypostatization of a “reality out there” does not imply the denial of working out a philosophically adequate concept of (...)
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