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  1. The Relative Importance of Social Responsibility in Determining Organizational Effectiveness: Student Responses II.Kenneth L. Kraft & Anusorn Singhapakdi - 1995 - Journal of Business Ethics 14 (4):315-326.
    This paper, Study II, is the second in a series of papers investigating the relative importance of social responsibility criteria in determining organizational effectiveness, using student samples. A revised version of the Organizational Effectiveness Menu was used as a questionnaire with a sample of 182 senior undergraduate and the MBA students from three universities. Each respondent was asked to rate the importance of the criteria from a manager's perspective. The results support the earlier findings that students responding as managers rate (...)
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  • A Problem-Based Learning Approach to Business Ethics Education.Yusuf M. Sidani & Jon Thornberry - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics Education 9:215-231.
    There are several challenges associated with traditional business ethics education. While case studies have been used extensively in ethics education, such use can be complemented by using Problem Based Learning. PBL represents a pedagogy employing more collaborative tools that involve students more extensively in the learning process. A well-designed teaching approach based on PBL can have significant positive impact on students’ learning. This paper supplies a representative teaching interaction based on PBL, and discusses the implications of its structure. Introducing PBL (...)
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  • Business Ethics Course and Readiness of MBA Students to Manage Ethically.Wilson Muyinda Mande - 2012 - African Journal of Business Ethics 6 (2):133.
    The study explored the contribution of a business ethics course at Nkumba University, Uganda to the readiness of MBA students to manage enterprises ethically. A purposely designed questionnaire was distributed to 42 students who had completed the course. The major finding was that these MBA students had 30% readiness to manage ethically. To establish whether this readiness was a function of the business ethics course, a path analysis was done to develop a hypothesised model. This model revealed that the readiness (...)
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  • The Effect of an Ethical Decision-Making Training on Young Athletes’ Attitudes Toward Doping.Anne-Marie Elbe & Ralf Brand - 2016 - Ethics and Behavior 26 (1):32-44.
    This article examines whether a training program in ethical decision making can change young athletes’ doping attitudes. Fifty-two young elite athletes were randomly assigned to either an ethical decision-making training group or a standard-knowledge-based educational program group. Another 17 young elite athletes were recruited for no-treatment control purposes. The ethical decision-making training comprised six 30-min online sessions in which the participants had to work through 18 ethical dilemmas related to doping. The standard-knowledge-based educational program was also conducted in six online (...)
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  • Teaching Business Ethics Through Strategically Integrated Micro-Insertions.Alesia Slocum, Sylvia Rohlfer & Cesar Gonzalez-Canton - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 125 (1):1-14.
    This article identifies an integrated teaching strategy that was originally developed for engineers, the so-called ‘micro-insertion’ approach, as a practical and effective means to teach ethics at business schools. It is argued that instructors can incorporate not only generic or thematic learning objectives for students into this method (i.e., the intended content of what is being taught: in our case, an underlying ethical base for doing business), but also do so via a strategically integrated approach regarding the appropriate mix and (...)
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  • A Case Example: Integrating Ethics Into the Academic Business Curriculum.Gael M. McDonald - 2004 - Journal of Business Ethics 54 (4):371-384.
    This paper combines a review of existing literature in the field of business ethics education and a case study relating to the integration of ethics into an undergraduate degree. Prior to any discussion relating to the integration of ethics into the business curriculum, we need to be cognisant of, and prepared for, the arguments raised by sceptics in both the business and academic environments, in regard to the teaching of ethics. Having laid this foundation, the paper moves to practical questions (...)
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  • The Ethics of Gamification in a Marketing Context.Andrea Stevenson Thorpe & Stephen Roper - 2019 - Journal of Business Ethics 155 (2):597-609.
    Gamification is an increasingly common marketing tool. Yet, to date, there has been little examination of its ethical implications. In light of the potential implications of this type of stealth marketing for consumer welfare, this paper discusses the ethical dilemmas raised by the use of gamified approaches to marketing. The paper draws on different schools of ethics to examine gamification as an overall system, as well as its constituent parts. This discussion leads to a rationale and suggestions for how gamification (...)
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  • Does Ethical Reinforcement Pay? Evidence From the Canadian Mutual Fund Industry in the Post‐Financial Crisis Era.K. Smimou & Mohamed A. Ayadi - 2019 - Business and Society Review 124 (1):73-114.
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  • Managers’ Attitudes Toward Codes of Ethics: Are There Gender Differences?Nabil Ibrahim, John Angelidis & Igor M. Tomic - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 90 (S3):343-353.
    This article extends previous research by investigating the basis for attitudes toward codes of ethics. Specifically, its purposes are threefold. First, to examine business managers' attitudes toward codes of ethics. Second, to ascertain whether gender differences do exist with respect to these attitudes. Third, to provide a benchmark for future studies of attitudes toward codes of ethics. A survey of 286 managers revealed significant differences between the female and male managers with respect to six of the eight variables studied.
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  • Student Experiences with Service Learning in a Business Ethics Course.John Kohls - 1996 - Journal of Business Ethics 15 (1):45 - 57.
    Service learning provides many challenges and opportunities for the instructor who wishes to test its potential. This paper looks at some of the promise for service learning in the undergraduate Business Ethics course and describes one experience with this project. Quotations from student journals and reflective papers are utilized to present the student's perspective on the project. Some suggestions are offered for insuring effective service learning in courses like Business Ethics.
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  • Comparing Virtue, Consequentialist, and Deontological Ethics-Based Corporate Social Responsibility: Mitigating Microfinance Risk in Institutional Voids.Subrata Chakrabarty & A. Erin Bass - 2015 - Journal of Business Ethics 126 (3):487-512.
    Due to the nature of lending practices and support services offered to the poor in developing countries, portfolio risk is a growing concern for the microfinance industry. Though previous research highlights the importance of risk for microfinance organizations, not much is known about how microfinance organizations can mitigate risks incurred from providing loans to the poor in developing countries. Further, though many microfinance organizations practice corporate social responsibility to help create economic and social wealth in developing countries, the impact of (...)
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  • Meta-Learning About Business Ethics: Building Honorable Business School Communities. [REVIEW]Linda Klebe Trevino & Donald McCabe - 1994 - Journal of Business Ethics 13 (6):405 - 416.
    We propose extending business ethics education beyond the formal curriculum to the hidden curriculum where messages about ethics and values are implicitly sent and received. In this meta-learning approach, students learn by becoming active participants in an honorable business school community where real ethical issues are openly discussed and acted upon. When combined with formal ethics instruction, this meta-learning approach provides a framework for a proposed comprehensive program of business ethics education.
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  • Using a Faculty Survey to Kick-Start an Ethics Curriculum Upgrade.Montgomery Van Wart, David Baker & Anna Ni - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 122 (4):571-585.
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  • A Question of Ethics: Developing Information System Ethics. [REVIEW]Eli Cohen & Larry Cornwell - 1989 - Journal of Business Ethics 8 (6):431 - 437.
    This study develops a pedagogy for the teaching of ethical principles in information systems (IS) classes, and reports on an empirical study that supports the efficacy of the approach. The proposed pedagogy involves having management information systems professors lead questioning and discussion on a list of ethical issues as part of their existing IS courses. The rationale for this pedagogy involves (1) the maturational aspects of ethics, and (2) the importance of repetition, challenge, and practice in developing a personal set (...)
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  • An Applied Ethical Analysis System in Business.Alan Wong & Eugene Beckman - 1992 - Journal of Business Ethics 11 (3):173 - 178.
    Much of the discussion on business ethics is philosophical in nature. There is no lack of theories and ideals on moral reasoning. What is missing is translating these moral theories and principles into specific, operational procedures that can indicate a proper course of action. Although most business actions are routine and do not raise serious ethical questions, many people experience difficulty in applying their personal moral principles to specific business decisions in ethically-dilemmatic situations.This study seeks to develop a framework that (...)
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  • Case Studies of Ethics Scandals: Effects on Ethical Perceptions of Finance Students.Julie A. B. Cagle & Melissa S. Baucus - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 64 (3):213-229.
    Ethics instructors often use cases to help students understand ethics within a corporate context, but we need to know more about the impact a case-based pedagogy has on students’ ability to make ethical decisions. We used a pre- and post-test methodology to assess the effect of using cases to teach ethics in a finance course. We also wanted to determine whether recent corporate ethics scandals might have impacted students’ perceptions of the importance and prevalence of ethics in business, so we (...)
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  • A Case Example: Integrating Ethics Into the Academic Business Curriculum. [REVIEW]Gael M. McDonald - 2004 - Journal of Business Ethics 54 (4):371 - 384.
    This paper combines a review of existing literature in the field of business ethics education and a case study relating to the integration of ethics into an undergraduate degree. Prior to any discussion relating to the integration of ethics into the business curriculum, we need to be cognisant of, and prepared for, the arguments raised by sceptics in both the business and academic environments, in regard to the teaching of ethics. Having laid this foundation, the paper moves to practical questions (...)
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  • A Note on the Teaching of Ethics in the MBA Macroeconomics Course.John D. Abell - 1990 - Journal of Business Ethics 9 (1):21 - 29.
    While there is general agreement on the need to teach ethics in the MBA classroom, there are great difficulties in completely integrating such material within the confines of an actual MBA program. This paper attempts to address these difficulties by focusing on the teaching of such issues in one particular class — MBA macroeconomics.Ethical dilemmas often arise due to failures of the market place or due to inappropriate assumptions regarding the market model. Thus, specific suggestions are offered in regard to (...)
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  • Accounting Education, Socialisation and the Ethics of Business.John Ferguson, David Collison, David Power & Lorna Stevenson - 2011 - Business Ethics 20 (1):12-29.
    This study provides empirical evidence in relation to a growing body of literature concerned with the ‘socialisation’ effects of accounting and business education. A prevalent criticism within this literature is that accounting and business education in the United Kingdom and the United States, by assuming a ‘value-neutral’ appearance, ignores the implicit ethical and moral assumptions by which it is underpinned. In particular, it has been noted that accounting and business education tends to prioritise the interests of shareholders above all other (...)
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  • The Relative Importance of Social Responsibility in Determining Organizational Effectiveness: Student Responses. [REVIEW]Kenneth L. Kraft - 1991 - Journal of Business Ethics 10 (3):315 - 326.
    This paper investigates the relative importance of social responsibility criteria in determining organizational effectiveness. The organizational effectiveness menu was used as a questionnaire with a sample of 151 senior undergraduates. Each respondent was asked to rate the importance of the criteria from three constituent perspectives within a service organization: (1) as a manager, (2) as an investor, (3) as an employee. Later, a subsample of students (n=61) responded to the same questionnaire acting as a manager in an assigned case study. (...)
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  • The Role of Ethics and Social Responsibility in Achieving Organizational Effectiveness: Students Versus Managers. [REVIEW]Kenneth L. Kraft & Anusorn Singhapakdi - 1991 - Journal of Business Ethics 10 (9):679 - 686.
    This paper investigates the differences in perceptions between business students and service-sector managers regarding the role that ethics and social responsibility serve in determining organizational effectiveness. An organizational effectiveness instrument containing business ethics and social responsibility items served as a questionnaire for a sample of 151 senior business undergraduates and 53 service-sector managers. The results indicated that while students acting as managers rate some social responsibility issues as more important than do managers, they also rate ethical conduct and a few (...)
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  • Teaching Business Ethics: Targeted Outputs.Edward L. Felton & Ronald R. Sims - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 60 (4):377-391.
    Business ethics is once again a hot topic as examples of improper business practices that violate commonly accepted ethical norms are brought to our attention. With the increasing number of scandals business schools find themselves on the defensive in explaining what they are doing to help respond to the call to teach ‘‘more’’ business ethics. This paper focuses on two issues germane to business ethics teaching efforts: the ‘‘targeted output’’ goals of teaching business ethics and when in the curriculum business (...)
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  • Using Role Play to Integrate Ethics Into the Business Curriculum a Financial Management Example.Kate M. Brown - 1994 - Journal of Business Ethics 13 (2):105 - 110.
    Calls for increasing integration of ethical considerations into business education are well documented. Business graduates are perceived to be ethically naive at best, and at worst, constrained in their moral development by the lack of ethical content in their courses. The pedagogic concern is to find effective methods of incorporating ethics into the fabric of business education. The purpose of this paper is to suggest and illustrate role play as an appropriate method for integrating ethical concerns.
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  • Business Moral Values of Supervisors and Subordinates and Their Effect on Employee Effectiveness.Ding-Yu Jiang, Yi-Chen Lin & Lin-Chin Lin - 2011 - Journal of Business Ethics 100 (2):239 - 252.
    Business moral values are defined as the personal moral values held by individuals who are engaged in business interactions. Direct supervisors may play an important role in shaping the business moral values of their subordinates. Using 264 supervisor— subordinate dyadic data from Taiwanese organizations, the study investigated the relationships among supervisor business moral values, subordinate business moral values, subordinate organizational commitment, job performance, and attendance. The results indicated that supervisor business moral values were positively associated with subordinate business moral values, (...)
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  • Corporate Social Responsibility: A Comparative Analysis of Perceptions of Practicing Accountants and Accounting Students.Nabil A. Ibrahim, John P. Angelidis & Donald P. Howard - 2006 - Journal of Business Ethics 66 (2-3):157-167.
    The results of a survey of 272 practicing accountants and 374 accounting students enrolled in six universities are analyzed. Differences and similarities between the two groups with regard to their attitudes toward corporate social responsibility are examined. The results indicate that the students exhibit greater concern about the ethical and discretionary components of corporate responsibility and a weaker orientation toward economic performance. No significant differences between the two groups were observed with respect to the legal dimension of corporate social responsibility. (...)
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  • Managers' Attitudes Toward Codes of Ethics: Are There Gender Differences?Nabil Ibrahim, John Angelidis & Igor M. Tomic - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 90 (S3):343 - 353.
    This article extends previous research by investigating the basis for attitudes toward codes of ethics. Specifically, its purposes are threefold. First, to examine business managers' attitudes toward codes of ethics. Second, to ascertain whether gender differences do exist with respect to these attitudes. Third, to provide a benchmark for future studies of attitudes toward codes of ethics. A survey of 286 managers revealed significant differences between the female and male managers with respect to six of the eight variables studied.
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  • The Role of Ethical Values in an Expanded Psychological Contract.Wayne O’Donohue & Lindsay Nelson - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 90 (2):251-263.
    Social values and beliefs systems are playing an increasingly influential role in shaping the attitudes and behavior of individuals and organizations towards the employment relationship. Many individuals seek a broader meaning in their work that will let them feel that they are contributing to the broader community. For many organizations, a willingness to behave ethically and assume responsibility for social and environmental consequences of their activities has become essential to maintaining their 'license to operate.' The appearance of these trends in (...)
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  • Accounting Education, Socialisation and the Ethics of Business.John Ferguson, David Collison, David Power & Lorna Stevenson - 2011 - Business Ethics: A European Review 20 (1):12-29.
  • Organizational Factors Encouraging Ethical Decision Making: An Exploration Into the Case of an Exemplar.Shannon Bowen - 2004 - Journal of Business Ethics 52 (4):311-324.
    What factors in the organizational culture of an ethically exemplary corporation are responsible for encouraging ethical decision making? This question was analyzed through an exploratory case study of a top pharmaceutical company that is a global leader in ethics. The participating organization is renowned in public opinion polls of ethics, credibility, and trust. This research explored organizational culture, communication in issues management and public relations, management theory, and deontological or utilitarian moral philosophy as factors that might encourage ethical analysis. Our (...)
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  • Using Inside Job to Teach Business Ethics.Ernest N. Biktimirov & Don Cyr - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 117 (1):209-219.
    This article recommends the film Inside Job as an effective teaching tool for illustrating the ethical issues that surrounded the global financial crisis of 2008 and the subsequent economic downturn. The study discusses issues such as the revolving door, conflicts of interest, fiduciary duty, executive compensation, and financial regulation. The presentation of each ethical issue comprises suggested questions, background information, and guides to specific sections of the film. An overview of the film is provided as well.
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  • Internationalizing the Business Ethics Curriculum: A Survey. [REVIEW]Christopher J. Cowton & Thomas W. Dunfee - 1995 - Journal of Business Ethics 14 (5):331 - 338.
    This article reports on a telephone survey of business school faculty in the United Kingdom, Asia and North America concerning efforts to internationalize the teaching of business ethics. International dimensions of business ethics are currently given only limited coverage in the business school curriculum with over half of the faculty surveyed indicating that less then 10% of their ethics teaching focuses on global issues. Teaching objectives vary widely with some faculty emphasizing a relativistic, diversity oriented perspective while others stress the (...)
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  • Objections to the Teaching of Business Ethics.Gael M. McDonald & Gabriel D. Donleavy - 1995 - Journal of Business Ethics 14 (10):839 - 853.
    To date the teaching of business ethics has been examined from the descriptive, prescriptive, and analytical perspectives. The descriptive perspective has reviewed the existence of ethics courses (e.g., Schoenfeldtet al., 1991; Bassiry, 1990; Mahoney, 1990; Singh, 1989), their historical development (e.g., Sims and Sims, 1991), and the format and syllabi of ethics courses (e.g., Hoffman and Moore, 1982). Alternatively, the prescriptive literature has centred on the pedagogical issues of teaching ethics (e.g., Hunt and Bullis, 1991; Strong and Hoffman, 1990; Reeves, (...)
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