Citations of work:

Jay L. Garfield (ed.) (1987). Modularity in Knowledge Representation and Natural-Language Understanding.

29 found
Order:
Are we missing citations?

PhilPapers citations & references are currently in beta testing. We expect to add many more in the future.

Meanwhile, you can use our bibliography tool to import references for this or another work.

Or you can directly add citations for the above work:

Search for work by author name and title
Add directly by record ID

  1.  33
    Imitation, Mind Reading, and Social Learning.Philip S. Gerrans - 2013 - Biological Theory 8 (1):20-27.
    Imitation has been understood in different ways: as a cognitive adaptation subtended by genetically specified cognitive mechanisms; as an aspect of domain general human cognition. The second option has been advanced by Cecilia Heyes who treats imitation as an instance of associative learning. Her argument is part of a deflationary treatment of the “mirror neuron” phenomenon. I agree with Heyes about mirror neurons but argue that Kim Sterelny has provided the tools to provide a better account of the nature and (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  2.  20
    Diversity and Unity of Modularity.Bongrae Seok - 2006 - Cognitive Science 30 (2):347-380.
    Since the publication of Fodor's (1983) The Modularity of Mind, there have been quite a few discussions of cognitive modularity among cognitive scientists. Generally, in those discussions, modularity means a property of specialized cognitive processes or a domain-specific body of information. In actuality, scholars understand modularity in many different ways. Different characterizations of modularity and modules were proposed and discussed, but they created misunderstanding and confusion. In this article, I classified and analyzed different approaches to modularity and argued for the (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  3.  74
    Theory of Mind, Logical Form and Eliminativism.John M. Collins - 2000 - Philosophical Psychology 13 (4):465-490.
    I argue for a cognitive architecture in which folk psychology is supported by an interface of a ToM module and the language faculty, the latter providing the former with interpreted LF structures which form the content representations of ToM states. I show that LF structures satisfy a range of key features asked of contents. I confront this account of ToM with eliminativism and diagnose and combat the thought that "success" and innateness are inconsistent with the falsity of folk psychology. I (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  4.  55
    Knowledge of Grammar as a Propositional Attitude.Jonathan Knowles - 2000 - Philosophical Psychology 13 (3):325 – 353.
    Noam Chomsky claims that we know the grammatical principles of our languages in pretty much the same sense that we know ordinary things about the world (e.g. facts), a view about linguistic knowledge that I term ''cognitivism''. In much recent philosophy of linguistics (including that sympathetic to Chomsky's general approach to language), cognitivism has been rejected in favour of an account of grammatical competence as some or other form of mental mechanism, describable at various levels of abstraction (''non-cognitivism''). I argue (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  5.  31
    Biological Thinking in Evolutionary Psychology: Rockbottom or Quicksand?H. Looren De Jong & W. J. Van Der Steen - 1998 - Philosophical Psychology 11 (2):183 – 205.
    Evolutionary psychology is put forward by its defenders as an extension of evolutionary biology, bringing psychology within the integrated causal chain of the hard sciences. It is extolled as a new paradigm for integrating psychology with the rest of science. We argue that such claims misrepresent the methods and explanations of evolutionary biology, and present a distorted view of the consequences that might be drawn from evolutionary biology for views of human nature. General theses about adaptation in biology are empty (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  6.  6
    Internal Recurrence.Don Ross - 1998 - Dialogue 37 (1):155-161.
  7.  9
    An Innate Language Faculty Needs Neither Modularity nor Localization.Derek Bickerton - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):631-632.
  8.  12
    Double Dissociation, Modularity, and Distributed Organization.John A. Bullinaria & Nick Chater - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):632.
  9.  3
    How to Grow a Human.Michael C. Corballis - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):632-633.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10.  4
    Sign Language and the Brain: Apes, Apraxia, and Aphasia.David Corina - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):633-634.
  11.  8
    Autonomy of Syntactic Processing and the Role of Broca's Area.Angela D. Friederici - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):634-635.
  12.  9
    Familial Language Impairment: The Evidence.Myrna Gopnik - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):635-636.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13.  4
    Speaking of Language: Thoughts on Associations.Susan Graham & Diane Poulin-Dubois - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):636.
  14.  4
    Neurobiological Approaches to Language: Falsehoods and Fallacies.Yosef Grodzinsky - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):637.
  15.  9
    A Worthy Enterprise Injured by Overinterpretation and Misrepresentation.Marc D. Hauser & Jon Sakata - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):638.
  16.  2
    Pluripotentiality, Epigenesis, and Language Acquisition.Bob Jacobs & Lori Larsen - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):639.
  17.  3
    Innateness, Autonomy, Universality, and the Neurobiology of Regular and Irregular Inflectional Morphology.David Kemmerer - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):639-641.
  18.  6
    Neuroanatomical Structures and Segregated Circuits.Philip Lieberman - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):641.
  19.  13
    Innateness, Autonomy, Universality? Neurobiological Approaches to Language.Ralph-Axel Müller - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):611-631.
  20.  3
    The Epigenesis of Regional Specificity.Ralph-Axel Müller - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):650-675.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21.  2
    Müller's Conclusions and Linguistic Research.Frederick J. Newmeyer - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):641-642.
  22.  12
    Neurobiology and Linguistics Are Not yet Unifiable.David Poeppel - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):642-643.
  23.  6
    Biology of Language: Principle Predictions and Evidence.Friedemann Pulvermüller, Bettina Mohr & Hubert Preissl - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):643-645.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24.  5
    It's a Far Cry From Speech to Language.Maritza Rivera-Gaxiola & Annette Karmiloff-Smith - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):645-646.
  25.  18
    Evolutionary Principles and the Emergence of Syntax.P. Thomas Schoenemann & William S.-Y. Wang - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):646-647.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26.  4
    Autonomy and its Discontents.Chris Sinha - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):647-648.
  27.  4
    A Polyglot Perspective on Dissociation.Neil Smith - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):648.
  28.  3
    Genes, Specificity, and the Lexical/Functional Distinction in Language Acquisition.Karin Stromswold - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):648-649.
  29.  3
    Is Human Language Just Another Neurobiological Specialization?Stephen F. Walker - 1996 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (4):649-650.