Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Real Individuals in Fictions, Fictional Surrogates in Stories.Alberto Voltolini - 2020 - Philosophia 48 (2):803-820.
    In the philosophy of fiction, a majority view is continuism, i.e., the thesis that ordinary names, or genuine singular terms in general, directly refer to ordinary real individuals in fiction-involving sentences – e.g. “Napoleon” in the sentences that constitute the text of Tolstoy’s War and Peace. But there is also a minority view, exceptionalism, which is the thesis that such terms change their semantic value in such sentences, either by directly referring to fictional surrogates of those individuals – what we (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Inheriting the World.Michel-Antoine Xhignesse - 2020 - Journal of Applied Logics 7 (2):163-70.
    A critical reflection on John Woods's new monograph, Truth in Fiction – Rethinking its Logic. I focus in particular on Woods’s world-inheritance thesis (what others have variously called ‘background,’ ‘the principle of minimal departure,’ and ‘the reality assumption,’ and which replaces Woods’s earlier ‘fill-conditions’) and its interplay with auctorial say-so, arguing that world-inheritance actually constrains auctorial say-so in ways Woods has not anticipated.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Co‐Identification and Fictional Names.Manuel García‐Carpintero - 2020 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 101 (1):3-34.
    Philosophy and Phenomenological Research, EarlyView.
    No categories
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • Singular Terms in Fiction. Fictional and “Real” Names.Jordi Valor Abad - 2019 - Disputatio 11 (54):111-142.
    In this introduction, I consider different problems posed by the use of singular terms in fiction, paying especial attention to proper names and, in particular, to names of real people, places, etc. As we will see, descriptivist and Millian theories of reference face different kinds of problems in explaining the use of fictional names in fiction-related contexts. Moreover, the task of advancing a uniform account of names in these contexts—an account which deals not only with fictional names but also with (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark