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  1. A Multidimensional Assessment of Ethical Codes: The Professional Business Association Perspective. [REVIEW]Lewis R. Tucker, Vlasis Stathakopolous & Charles H. Patti - 1999 - Journal of Business Ethics 19 (3):287 - 300.
    This article develops a multidimensional approach for the investigation of the ethical codes of professional associations. The authors: (a) examine various ethical frameworks to identify ethical constructs, (b) select ethical constructs to apply to the assessment of professional codes of ethics, (c) content analyze conceptual and descriptive similarities and differences across a large sample of professional codes of ethics, (d) address organizational variables that affect the development of ethical codes, and (e) investigate through survey research the beliefs and attitudes of (...)
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  • Codes of Ethics for Political Parties and Their Role in Communication.Nicolai Gori - 2018 - Postmodern Openings 9 (1):147-164.
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  • Ethical Codes in Sports Organizations: Classification Framework, Content Analysis, and the Influence of Content on Code Effectiveness.Els De Waegeneer, Jeroen Van De Sompele & Annick Willem - 2016 - Journal of Business Ethics 136 (3):587-598.
  • Business and Peace: Sketching the Terrain.Jennifer Oetzel, Michelle Westermann-Behaylo, Charles Koerber, Timothy L. Fort & Jorge Rivera - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 89 (S4):351-373.
    Our goals in this article are to summarize the existing literature on the role business can play in creating sustainable peace and to discuss important avenues for extending this research. As part of our discussion, we review the ethical arguments and related research made to date, including the rationale and motivation for businesses to engage in conflict resolution and peace building, and discuss how scholars are extending research in this area. We also focus on specific ways companies can actively engage (...)
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  • An Ethical Decision-Making Framework for Competitor Intelligence Gathering.Terri L. Rittenburg, Sean R. Valentine & James B. Faircloth - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 70 (3):235-245.
    Competitor intelligence gathering involves the aggregation of competitive information to facilitate strategic development and a competitive advantage. Unfortunately, companies are sometimes willing to carry out questionable gathering practices to collect such information. An ethical decision making framework for competitor intelligence gathering is presented in this paper that outlines the impact of several strengthening and weakening factors on individual ethical reasoning. Dialogue is provided about the management of intelligence gathering from various viewpoints, and the implications of these managerial suggestions are discussed.
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  • Host Country Sourcing of Multinational Enterprises: A Corporate Social Responsibility Perspective.Jae C. Jung & Khan-Pyo Lee - 2018 - Journal of Business Ethics 152 (3):683-701.
    Through corporate social responsibility activities, a firm can develop the capability for managing and benefiting from stakeholder relationships. This study refers to such a capability as stakeholder influence capacity. In a host country, locally sourcing parts and/or materials can generate economic value and improve social welfare. Moreover, local sourcing provides opportunities for a foreign firm to apply and advance SIC while closely interacting with host-country stakeholders. Accordingly, we expect that a firm, having gained SIC through CSR activities in its home (...)
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  • Ethics in the Transnational Corporation; the “Moral Buck” Stops Where?John Dobson - 1992 - Journal of Business Ethics 11 (1):21 - 27.
    This paper addresses two issues. The first issue relates directly to transnational corporations, while the second issue is broader and relates to all diversely held companies. To address the first issue I cite three representative instances where wanton environmental damage has signalled a lack of moral judgment on the part of a transnational corporation. I conclude from these instances that ethical considerations are not given adequate weight in corporate investment decisions.This leads to the second issue. Who should be making ethical (...)
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  • Universal Moral Values for Corporate Codes of Ethics.Mark S. Schwartz - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 59 (1-2):27-44.
    How can one establish if a corporate code of ethics is ethical in terms of its content? One important first step might be the establishment of core universal moral values by which corporate codes of ethics can be ethically constructed and evaluated. Following a review of normative research on corporate codes of ethics, a set of universal moral values is generated by considering three sources: (1) corporate codes of ethics; (2) global codes of ethics; and (3) the business ethics literature. (...)
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  • The Dissolution of Ethical Decision-Making in Organizations: A Comprehensive Review and Model. [REVIEW]Ralph W. Jackson, Charles M. Wood & James J. Zboja - 2013 - Journal of Business Ethics 116 (2):233-250.
    The purpose of this research is to present the major factors that lead to ethical dissolution in an organization. Specifically, drawing from a wide spectrum of sources, this study explores the impact of organizational, individual, and contextual factors that converge to contribute to ethical dissolution. Acknowledging that ethical decisions are, in the final analysis, made by individuals, this study presents a model of ethical dissolution that gives insight into how a variety of elements coalesce to draw individuals into decisions that (...)
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  • Interactive Effects of External Environmental Conditions and Internal Firm Characteristics on Mnes' Choice of Strategy in the Development of a Code of Conduct.Linda M. Sama - 2006 - Business Ethics Quarterly 16 (2):137-166.
    Abstract: Effects of globalization have amplified the magnitude and frequency of corporate abuses, particularly in developing economies where weak or absent rules undermine social norms and principles. Improving multinational enterprises’ (MNEs) ethical conduct is a factor of both the ability of firms to change behaviors in the direction of the moral good, and their willingness to do so. Constraints and enablers of a firm’s ability to act ethically emanate from the external environment, including the industry environment of which the firm (...)
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  • Multiple Communities and Controlling Corruption.Philip M. Nichols - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 88 (4):805 - 813.
    Corruption presents an assurance problem to businesses: all businesses are best off if none act corruptly but in the event that corruption occurs are better off if they act corruptly than if they do not, and because there is no assurance that other actors are not cheating a business does not know how to act. The usual solution to an assurance problem – criminal sanctions imposed on cheaters – does not work in a corrupt system. Integrative Social Contract Theory suggests (...)
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  • TNCs and the Corruption of GATT: Free Trade Versus Fair Trade. [REVIEW]John Dobson - 1993 - Journal of Business Ethics 12 (7):573 - 578.
    In order to enrich global corporate culture, a distinction must be made between the economic ideology of free trade and the moral ideology of fair trade. GATT has failed to make this distinction. Its sole ethos of free trade is only applicable among developmentally equivalent nations, and has been used by TNCs as a means for attaining their commercial ends in the third world. GATT''s lack of commitment to an objective of fair trade necessitates its replacement. This article suggests a (...)
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  • Trans-Ideological Business Values in International Codes of Conduct.Kathleen A. Getz - 1995 - International Journal of Value-Based Management 8 (2):117-134.
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