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  1. Animals and Humans, Thinking and Nature.David Morris - 2005 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 4 (1):49-72.
    Studies that compare human and animal behaviour suspend prejudices about mind, body and their relation, by approaching thinking in terms of behaviour. Yet comparative approaches typically engage another prejudice, motivated by human social and bodily experience: taking the lone animal as the unit of comparison. This prejudice informs Heidegger’s and Merleau-Ponty’s comparative studies, and conceals something important: that animals moving as a group in an environment can develop new sorts of “sense.” The study of animal group-life suggests a new way (...)
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  • Bergsonian Intuition, Husserlian Variation, Peirceian Abduction: Toward a Relation Between Method, Sense and Nature.David Morris - 2005 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 43 (2):267-298.
    Husserlian variation, Bergsonian intuition and Peircean abduction are contrasted as methodological responses to the traditional philosophical problem of deriving knowledge of universals from singulars. Each method implies a correspondingly different view of the generation of the variations from which knowledge is derived. To make sense of the latter differences, and to distinguish the different sorts of variation sought by philosophers and scientists, a distinction between extensive, intensive, and abductive-intensive variation is introduced. The link between philosophical method and the generation of (...)
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  • The Specter of the Past: What the History of Theoretical Biology Means Today.Manfred D. Laubichler - 2007 - Biological Theory 2 (2):131-133.
  • Ernst Mayer, Karl Jordan, and the History of Systematics.Kristin Johnson - 2005 - History of Science 43 (1):1-35.
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  • The Organism is Dead. Long Live the Organism!Manfred D. Laubichler - 2000 - Perspectives on Science 8 (3):286-315.
  • On Guinea Pigs, Dogs and Men: Anaphylaxis and the Study of Biological Individuality, 1902-1939.I. Lowy - 2003 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 34 (3):399-423.
    In 1910, Charles Richet suggested that studying individual variations in anaphylactic responses might both open a way to experimental investigation of the biological basis of individuality and help unify the immunological and physiological approaches to biological phenomena. The very opposite would happen however. In the next two decades, physiologists and immunologists interested in anaphylaxis and allergy experienced more and more difficulties in communicating. This divergence between the physiopathological and immunological approaches derived from discrepancies between the experimental systems used by each (...)
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  • What’s so Special About Model Organisms?Rachel A. Ankeny & Sabina Leonelli - 2011 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 42 (2):313-323.
    This paper aims to identify the key characteristics of model organisms that make them a specific type of model within the contemporary life sciences: in particular, we argue that the term “model organism” does not apply to all organisms used for the purposes of experimental research. We explore the differences between experimental and model organisms in terms of their material and epistemic features, and argue that it is essential to distinguish between their representational scope and representational target. We also examine (...)
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  • Regeneration: Thomas Hunt Morgan's Window Into Development. [REVIEW]Mary Evelyn Sunderland - 2010 - Journal of the History of Biology 43 (2):325 - 361.
    Early in his career Thomas Hunt Morgan was interested in embryology and dedicated his research to studying organisms that could regenerate. Widely regarded as a regeneration expert, Morgan was invited to deliver a series of lectures on the topic that he developed into a book, Regeneration (1901). In addition to presenting experimental work that he had conducted and supervised, Morgan also synthesized and critiqued a great deal of work by his peers and predecessors. This essay probes into the history of (...)
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  • From the Genetic to the Computer Program: The Historicity of 'Data' and 'Computation' in the Investigations on the Nematode Worm C. Elegans (1963–1998). [REVIEW]Miguel García-Sancho - 2012 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 43 (1):16-28.