Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. The Vegetative State and the Science of Consciousness.Nicholas Shea & Tim Bayne - 2010 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 61 (3):459.
    Consciousness in experimental subjects is typically inferred from reports and other forms of voluntary behaviour. A wealth of everyday experience confirms that healthy subjects do not ordinarily behave in these ways unless they are conscious. Investigation of consciousness in vegetative state patients has been based on the search for neural evidence that such broad functional capacities are preserved in some vegetative state patients. We call this the standard approach. To date, the results of the standard approach have suggested that some (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   22 citations  
  • Functional Neuroimaging and Withdrawal of Life-Sustaining Treatment From Vegetative Patients.D. J. Wilkinson, G. Kahane, M. Horne & J. Savulescu - 2009 - Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (8):508-511.
    Recent studies using functional magnetic resonance imaging of patients in a vegetative state have raised the possibility that such patients retain some degree of consciousness. In this paper, the ethical implications of such findings are outlined, in particular in relation to decisions about withdrawing life-sustaining treatment. It is sometimes assumed that if there is evidence of consciousness, treatment should not be withdrawn. But, paradoxically, the discovery of consciousness in very severely brain-damaged patients may provide more reason to let them die. (...)
    Direct download (11 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  • Detailed Behavioral Assessment Promotes Accurate Diagnosis in Patients with Disorders of Consciousness.Yael Gilutz, Avraham Lazary, Hana Karpin, Jean-Jacques Vatine, Tamar Misha, Hadassah Fortinsky & Haggai Sharon - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  • Detection of Mental Imagery and Attempted Movements in Patients with Disorders of Consciousness Using EEG.Petar Horki, Gã¼Nther Bauernfeind, Daniela S. Klobassa, Christoph Pokorny, Gerald Pichler, Walter Schippinger & Gernot R. Mã¼Ller-Putz - 2014 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.
  • Detection of Response to Command Using Voluntary Control of Breathing in Disorders of Consciousness.Vanessa Charland-Verville, Damien Lesenfants, Lee Sela, Quentin Noirhomme, Erik Ziegler, Camille Chatelle, Anton Plotkin, Noam Sobel & Steven Laureys - 2014 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.
  • ‘In a Twilight World’? Judging the Value of Life for the Minimally Conscious Patient.Richard Huxtable - 2013 - Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (9):565-569.
    The recent ruling from England on the case of M is one of very few worldwide to consider whether life-sustaining treatment, in the form of clinically assisted nutrition and hydration, should continue to be provided to a patient in a minimally conscious state. Formally concerned with the English law pertaining to precedent autonomy (specifically advance decision-making) and the best interests of the incapacitated patient, the judgment issued in M's case implicitly engages with three different accounts of the value of human (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • How Family Caregivers' Medical and Moral Assumptions Influence Decision Making for Patients in the Vegetative State: A Qualitative Interview Study.K. Kuehlmeyer, G. D. Borasio & R. J. Jox - 2012 - Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (6):332-337.
    Background Decisions on limiting life-sustaining treatment for patients in the vegetative state (VS) are emotionally and morally challenging. In Germany, doctors have to discuss, together with the legal surrogate (often a family member), whether the proposed treatment is in accordance with the patient's will. However, it is unknown whether family members of the patient in the VS actually base their decisions on the patient's wishes. Objective To examine the role of advance directives, orally expressed wishes, or the presumed will of (...)
    Direct download (13 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  • Neuroethics and the Problem of Other Minds: Implications of Neuroscience for the Moral Status of Brain-Damaged Patients and Nonhuman Animals. [REVIEW]Martha J. Farah - 2008 - Neuroethics 1 (1):9-18.
    Our ethical obligations to another being depend at least in part on that being’s capacity for a mental life. Our usual approach to inferring the mental state of another is to reason by analogy: If another being behaves as I do in a circumstance that engenders a certain mental state in me, I conclude that it has engendered the same mental state in him or her. Unfortunately, as philosophers have long noted, this analogy is fallible because behavior and mental states (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  • Pain Perception in Disorders of Consciousness: Neuroscience, Clinical Care, and Ethics in Dialogue. [REVIEW]A. Demertzi, E. Racine, M.-A. Bruno, D. Ledoux, O. Gosseries, A. Vanhaudenhuyse, M. Thonnard, A. Soddu, G. Moonen & S. Laureys - 2013 - Neuroethics 6 (1):37-50.
    Pain, suffering and positive emotions in patients in vegetative state/unresponsive wakefulness syndrome (VS/UWS) and minimally conscious states (MCS) pose clinical and ethical challenges. Clinically, we evaluate behavioural responses after painful stimulation and also emotionally-contingent behaviours (e.g., smiling). Using stimuli with emotional valence, neuroimaging and electrophysiology technologies can detect subclinical remnants of preserved capacities for pain which might influence decisions about treatment limitation. To date, no data exist as to how healthcare providers think about end-of-life options (e.g., withdrawal of artificial nutrition (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • The Dissociation Between Command Following and Communication in Disorders of Consciousness: An fMRI Study in Healthy Subjects.Natalie R. Osborne, Adrian M. Owen & Davinia Fernández-Espejo - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  • The Steady-State Response of the Cerebral Cortex to the Beat of Music Reflects Both the Comprehension of Music and Attention.Benjamin Meltzer, Chagit S. Reichenbach, Chananel Braiman, Nicholas D. Schiff, A. J. Hudspeth & Tobias Reichenbach - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  • Electroencephalography Measures of Neural Connectivity in the Assessment of Brain Responses to Salient Auditory Stimuli in Patients with Disorders of Consciousness.Victoria Lord & Jolanta Opacka-Juffry - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Promoting the Use of Personally Relevant Stimuli for Investigating Patients with Disorders of Consciousness.Fabien Perrin, Maïté Castro, Barbara Tillmann & Jacques Luauté - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Feasibility of the Music Therapy Assessment Tool for Awareness in Disorders of Consciousness for Use with Pediatric Populations.Wendy L. Magee, Claire M. Ghetti & Alvin Moyer - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Pascal’s Wager and Deciding About the Life-Sustaining Treatment of Patients in Persistent Vegetative State.Jukka Varelius - 2013 - Neuroethics 6 (2):277-285.
    An adaptation of Pascal’s Wager argument has been considered useful in deciding about the provision of life-sustaining treatment for patients in persistent vegetative state. In this article, I assess whether people making such decisions should resort to the application of Pascal’s idea. I argue that there is no sufficient reason to give it an important role in making the decisions.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Border Zones of Consciousness: Another Immigration Debate?Joseph J. Fins - 2007 - American Journal of Bioethics 7 (1):51-54.
  • Can We Scan For Truth in a Society of Liars?Tom Buller - 2005 - American Journal of Bioethics 5 (2):58-60.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • The Orwellian Threat to Emerging Neurodiagnostic Technologies.Joseph J. Fins - 2005 - American Journal of Bioethics 5 (2):56-58.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • The History of BCI: From a Vision for the Future to Real Support for Personhood in People with Locked-in Syndrome.Andrea Kübler - forthcoming - Neuroethics:1-18.
    The history of brain-computer interfaces developed from a mere idea in the days of early digital technology to today’s highly sophisticated approaches for signal detection, recording, and analysis. In the 1960s, electroencephalography was tied to the laboratory due to equipment and recording requirements. Today, amplifiers exist that are built in the electrode cap and are so resistant to movement artefacts that data collection in the field is no longer a critical issue. Within 60 years, the field has moved from simple (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Neuroethics and Neuroimaging: Moving Toward Transparency.Joseph J. Fins - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (9):46 – 52.
    Without exaggeration, it could be said that we are entering a golden age of neuroscience. Informed by recent developments in neuroimaging that allow us to peer into the working brain at both a structural and functional level, neuroscientists are beginning to untangle mechanisms of recovery after brain injury and grapple with age-old questions about brain and mind and their correlates neural mechanisms and consciousness. Neuroimaging, coupled with new diagnostic categories and assessment scales are helping us develop a new diagnostic nosology (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • Long-Lasting Coma.Sergio Bagnato, Cristina Boccagni, A. Sant'Angelo, Alexander A. Fingelkurts, Andrew A. Fingelkurts, C. Gagliardo & G. Galardi - 2014 - Functional Neurology 29 (3):201-205.
    In this report, we describe the case of a patient who has remained in a comatose state for more than one year after a traumatic and hypoxic brain injury. This state, which we refer to as long-lasting coma (LLC), may be a disorder of consciousness with significantly different features from those of conventional coma, the vegetative state, or brain death. On the basis of clinical, neurophysiological and neuroimaging data, we hypothesize that a multilevel involvement of the ascending reticular activating system (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Using Best Interests Meetings for People in a Prolonged Disorder of Consciousness to Improve Clinical and Ethical Management.Derick T. Wade - 2018 - Journal of Medical Ethics 44 (5):336-342.
    Current management of people with prolonged disorders of consciousness is failing patients, families and society. The causes include a general lack of concern, knowledge and expertise; a legal and professional framework which impedes timely and appropriate decision-making and/or enactment of the decision; and the exclusive focus on the patient, with no legitimate means to consider the broader consequences of healthcare decisions. This article argues that a clinical pathway based on the principles of the English Mental Capacity Act 2005 and using (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Back to the Bedside? Making Clinical Decisions in Patients with Prolonged Unconsciousness.Derick Wade - 2017 - Journal of Medical Ethics 43 (7):457.1-458.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Eye Gaze and Conscious Processing in Severely Brain-Injured Patients.Camille Chatelle, Steven Laureys, Steve Majerus, Caroline Schnakers, Paula M. Niedenthal, Martial Mermillod, Marcus Maringer & Ursula Hess - 2010 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 33 (6):442.
    Niedenthal et al. discuss the importance of eye gaze in embodied simulation and, more globally, in the processing of emotional visual stimulation (such as facial expression). In this commentary, we illustrate the relationship between oriented eye movements, consciousness, and emotion by using the case of severely brain-injured patients recovering from coma (i.e., vegetative and minimally conscious patients).
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Persistent Vegetative State, Akinetic Mutism and Consciousness.Will Davies & Neil Levy - 2016 - In Walter Sinnott-Armstrong (ed.), Finding Consciousness: The Neuroscience, Ethics, and Law of Severe Brain Damage. Oxford University Press. pp. 122-136.
  • Exploration of Functional Connectivity During Preferred Music Stimulation in Patients with Disorders of Consciousness.Lizette Heine, Maïté Castro, Charlotte Martial, Barbara Tillmann, Steven Laureys & Fabien Perrin - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Editorial: Music and Disorders of Consciousness: Emerging Research, Practice and Theory.Wendy L. Magee, Barbara Tillmann, Fabien Perrin & Caroline Schnakers - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Neurological Diagnosis is More Than a State of Mind: Diagnostic Clarity and Impaired Consciousness.Joseph J. Fins & F. Plum - 2004 - Archives of Neurology 61 (9):1354-1355.
  • Brain Response to One's Own Name in Vegetative State, Minimally Conscious State, and Locked-in Syndrome.Fabien Perrin, Caroline Schnakers, Manuel Schabus, Christian Degueldre, Serge Goldman, Serge Brédart, Marie-Elisabeth E. Faymonville, Maurice Lamy, Gustave Moonen, André Luxen, Pierre Maquet & Steven Laureys - 2006 - Archives of Neurology 63 (4):562-569.
  • Assessing Decision-Making Capacity After Severe Brain Injury.Peterson Andrew - unknown
    Severe brain injury is a leading cause of death and disability. Following severe brain injury diagnosis is difficult and errors frequently occur. Recent findings in clinical neuroscience may offer a solution. Neuroimaging has been used to detect preserved cognitive function and awareness in some patients clinically diagnosed as being in a vegetative state. Remarkably, neuroimaging has also been used to communicate with some vegetative patients through a series of yes/no questions. Some have speculated that, one day, this method may allow (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Challenge of Disentangling Reportability and Phenomenal Consciousness in Post-Comatose States.Audrey Vanhaudenhuyse, Marie-Aurélie Bruno, Serge Brédart, Alain Plenevaux & Steven Laureys - 2007 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (5-6):529-530.
    Determining whether or not noncommunicative patients are phenomenally conscious is a major clinical and ethical challenge. Clinical assessment is usually limited to the observation of these patients' motor responses. Recent neuroimaging technology and brain computer interfaces help clinicians to assess whether patients are conscious or not, and to avoid diagnostic errors.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Development of the Italian Version of the Near-Death Experience Scale.Francesca Pistoia, Giulia Mattiacci, Marco Sarà, Luca Padua, Claudio Macchi & Simona Sacco - 2018 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 12.
  • EEG Oscillatory States as Neuro-Phenomenology of Consciousness as Revealed From Patients in Vegetative and Minimally Conscious States.Alexander A. Fingelkurts, Andrew A. Fingelkurts, Sergio Bagnato, Cristina Boccagni & Giuseppe Galardi - 2012 - Consciousness and Cognition 21 (1):149-169.
    The value of resting electroencephalogram (EEG) in revealing neural constitutes of consciousness (NCC) was examined. We quantified the dynamic repertoire, duration and oscillatory type of EEG microstates in eyes-closed rest in relation to the degree of expression of clinical self-consciousness. For NCC a model was suggested that contrasted normal, severely disturbed state of consciousness and state without consciousness. Patients with disorders of consciousness were used. Results suggested that the repertoire, duration and oscillatory type of EEG microstates in resting condition quantitatively (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • Minimally Conscious State and Human Dignity.Jukka Varelius - 2009 - Neuroethics 2 (1):35-50.
    Recent progress in neurosciences has improved our understanding of chronic disorders of consciousness. One example of this advancement is the emergence of the new diagnostic category of minimally conscious state (MCS). The central characteristic of MCS is impaired consciousness. Though the phenomenon now referred to as MCS pre-existed its inclusion in diagnostic classifications, the current medical ethical concepts mainly apply to patients with normal consciousness and to non-conscious patients. Accordingly, how we morally should stand with persons in minimally conscious state (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • The Thalamic Dynamic Core Theory of Conscious Experience.Lawrence M. Ward - 2011 - Consciousness and Cognition 20 (2):464-486.
    I propose that primary conscious awareness arises from synchronized activity in dendrites of neurons in dorsal thalamic nuclei, mediated particularly by inhibitory interactions with thalamic reticular neurons. In support, I offer four evidential pillars: consciousness is restricted to the results of cortical computations; thalamus is the common locus of action of brain injury in vegetative state and of general anesthetics; the anatomy and physiology of the thalamus imply a central role in consciousness; neural synchronization is a neural correlate of consciousness.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Perception of Value and the Minimally Conscious State.Stephen Napier - 2015 - HEC Forum 27 (3):265-286.
    The “disability paradox” is the idea that for those who become severely disabled, their own quality of life assessment remains at or slightly below the QoL assessments of normal controls. This is a source of skepticism regarding third-person QoL judgments of the disabled. I argue here that this skepticism applies as well to those who are in the minimally conscious state. For rather simple means of sustaining an MCS patient’s life, the cost of being wrong that the patient would not (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Are There Levels of Consciousness?Tim Bayne, Jakob Hohwy & Adrian M. Owen - 2016 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 20 (6):405-413.
    The notion of a level of consciousness is a key construct in the science of consciousness. Not only is the term employed to describe the global states of consciousness that are associated with post-comatose disorders, epileptic absence seizures, anaesthesia, and sleep, it plays an increasingly influential role in theoretical and methodological contexts. However, it is far from clear what precisely a level of consciousness is supposed to be. This paper argues that the levels-based framework for conceptualizing global states of consciousness (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   20 citations  
  • Pascal's Wager and the Persistent Vegetative State.Jim Stone - 2007 - Bioethics 21 (2):84–92.
    I argue that a version of Pascal's Wager applies to the persistent vegetative state with sufficient force that it ought to part of advance directives.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Is It Better to Be Minimally Conscious Than Vegetative?D. Wilkinson & J. Savulescu - 2013 - Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (9):557-558.
    In the case of Re M, summarised in the paper by Julian Sheather, Justice Baker faced the difficult task of weighing up objectively whether or not it was in Mâs best interests to withdraw artificial feeding and to let her die.1 The judge concluded that M was ârecognisably aliveâ, and that the advantages of continued life outweighed the disadvantages. He compared her minimally conscious state favourably to that of a persistent vegetative state .2 It was clear that artificial feeding would (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • EEG and fMRI Agree: Mental Arithmetic is the Easiest Form of Imagery to Detect.Amabilis H. Harrison, Michael D. Noseworthy, James P. Reilly, Weiguang Guan & John F. Connolly - 2017 - Consciousness and Cognition 48:104-116.
  • Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Induced Slow Wave Activity Modification: A Possible Role in Disorder of Consciousness Differential Diagnosis?Laura Rosa Pisani, Antonino Naro, Antonino Leo, Irene Aricò, Francesco Pisani, Rosalia Silvestri, Placido Bramanti & Rocco Salvatore Calabrò - 2015 - Consciousness and Cognition 38:1-8.
  • Neuroimaging and Disorders of Consciousness: Envisioning an Ethical Research Agenda.Joseph J. Fins, Judy Illes, James L. Bernat, Joy Hirsch, Steven Laureys & Emily Murphy - 2008 - American Journal of Bioethics 8 (9):3 – 12.
    The application of neuroimaging technology to the study of the injured brain has transformed how neuroscientists understand disorders of consciousness, such as the vegetative and minimally conscious states, and deepened our understanding of mechanisms of recovery. This scientific progress, and its potential clinical translation, provides an opportunity for ethical reflection. It was against this scientific backdrop that we convened a conference of leading investigators in neuroimaging, disorders of consciousness and neuroethics. Our goal was to develop an ethical frame to move (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   24 citations  
  • Implications of Recent Neuroscientific Findings in Patients with Disorders of Consciousness.L. Syd M. Johnson - 2010 - Neuroethics 3 (2):185-196.
    A pressing issue in neuroscience is the high rate of misdiagnosis of disorders of consciousness. As new research on patients with disorders of consciousness has revealed surprising and previously unknown cognitive capacities, the need to develop better and more reliable methods of diagnosing these disorders becomes more urgent. So too the need to expand our ethical and social frameworks for thinking about these patients, to accommodate new concerns that will accompany new revelations. A recent study on trace conditioning and learning (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Minimally Conscious States, Deep Brain Stimulation, and What is Worse Than Futility.Grant Gillett - 2011 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 8 (2):145-149.
    The concept of futility is sometimes regarded as a cloak for medical paternalism in that it rolls together medical and value judgments. Often, despite attempts to disambiguate the concept, that is true and it can be applied in such a way as to marginalize the real interests of a patient. I suggest we replace it with a conceptual toolkit that includes physiological futility, substantial benefit (SB), and the risk of unacceptable badness (RUB) in that these concepts allow us to articulate (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • The Ethical Pain.Michele Farisco - 2013 - Neuroethics 6 (2):265-276.
    The intriguing issue of pain and suffering in patients with disorders of consciousness (DOCs), particularly in Unresponsive Wakefulness Syndrome/Vegetative State (UWS/VS) and Minimally Conscious State (MCS), is assessed from a theoretical point of view, through an overview of recent neuroscientific literature, in order to sketch an ethical analysis. In conclusion, from a legal and ethical point of view, formal guidelines and a situationist ethics are proposed in order to best manage the critical scientific uncertainty about pain and suffering in DOCs (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Recent Case Developments in Health Law.Sally Wang, Jeremy O. Bressman & Jay S. Reidler - 2010 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 38 (3):708-716.
  • Leben und Moral.Sebastian Rödl - 2014 - Jahrbuch für Wissenschaft Und Ethik 18 (1).
    Name der Zeitschrift: Jahrbuch für Wissenschaft und Ethik Jahrgang: 18 Heft: 1 Seiten: 261-278.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Minimally Conscious State, Human Dignity, and the Significance of Species: A Reply to Kaczor.Jukka Varelius - 2011 - Neuroethics (Browse Results) 6 (1):85-95.
    Abstract In a recent issue of Neuroethics , I considered whether the notion of human dignity could help us in solving the moral problems the advent of the diagnostic category of minimally conscious state (MCS) has brought forth. I argued that there is no adequate account of what justifies bestowing all MCS patients with the special worth referred to as human dignity. Therefore, I concluded, unless that difficulty can be solved we should resort to other values than human dignity in (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Self-Consciousness in Non-Communicative Patients.Steven Laureys, Fabien Perrin & Serge Brédart - 2007 - Consciousness and Cognition 16 (3):722-741.
    The clinical and para-clinical examination of residual self-consciousness in non-communicative severely brain damaged patients remains exceptionally challenging. Passive presentation of the patient’s own name and own face are known to be effective attention-grabbing stimuli when clinically assessing consciousness at the patient’s bedside. Event-related potential and functional neuroimaging studies using such self-referential stimuli are currently being used to disentangle the cognitive hierarchy of self-processing. We here review neuropsychological, neuropathological, electrophysiological and neuroimaging studies using the own name and own face paradigm obtained (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   16 citations  
  • The Case of Jahi McMath: A Neurologist's View.D. Alan Shewmon - 2018 - Hastings Center Report 48 (S4):S74-S76.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark