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  1. The Educational Cost of Philosophical Suicide: What It Means to Be Lucid.Simone Thornton - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 51 (6):608-618.
    The struggle to become lucid is at the heart of The Myth of Sisyphus. To understand the absurd is to understand that the fit between our conception of the world and the world itself is fraught with uncertainty; lucidity is the elucidation of the absurd. To be lucid is to revolt against the type of certainty that leads to suffering; to revolt against philosophical suicide. Camus teaches us the intellectual humility that stays hands; there is no reasoning that justifies suffering. (...)
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  • The Experience of Strangeness in Education: Camus, Jean-Baptiste Clamence and the Little Ease.Aidan Curzon-Hobson - 2017 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 49 (3):264-272.
    When The Myth of Sisyphus describes those who live in the ‘rarefied air of the absurd’, Camus uses the word fidelity. This signals a recognition of both defeat and the demand for struggle. This suggests a humility. Education can be said to have this characteristic; it is constantly in service to the new and yet understands these come with limits. And these limits are overcome as education develops the mind to see differently and change the world we live in. This (...)
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  • Camus, Habitat and the Art of Seeing.Aidan Hobson - 2017 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (13):1249-1258.
    The early essays of Camus have been underexplored as educational texts. The discussion here introduces these texts for educational consideration. The analysis uncovers themes which link to existing educational research on Camus. As these are autobiographical texts they also provide new insight on the genesis of Camus’ thinking on subjects of interest to education, and Camus’ own educational journey into the absurd. The discussion here suggests the lyrical essays explore the connections between learning and the natural landscape, and as a (...)
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  • On Being Musical: Education Towards Inclusion.Eve Ruddock - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (5):489-498.
    This article questions educational practices that undermine ‘being’ musical. Where Western misconceptions about the nature of human musicality distance many individuals from meaningful engagement with an intrinsic part of their humanity, I challenge the status quo to argue for an inclusive educational practice which gives everyone an opportunity to ‘be’ musical. Despite evidence from neuroscience now supporting the understanding that humans are a musical species, the widespread neo-liberal oriented focus on vocational training fails to recognise music as an essential aspect (...)
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  • Inoculation Against Wonder: Finding an Antidote in Camus, Pragmatism and the Community of Inquiry.Gilbert Burgh & Simone Thornton - 2016 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 48 (9):884-898.
    In this paper, we will explore how Albert Camus has much to offer philosophers of education. Although a number of educationalists have attempted to explicate the educational implications of Camus’ literary works, these analyses have not attempted to extrapolate pedagogical guidelines towards developing an educational framework for children’s philosophical practice in the way Matthew Lipman did from John Dewey’s philosophy of education, which informed his philosophy for children curriculum and pedagogy. We focus on the phenomenology of inquiry; that is, inquiry (...)
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  • On Being Musical: Education Towards Inclusion.Eve Ruddock - 2016 - Educational Philosophy and Theory:1-10.
    This article questions educational practices that undermine ‘being’ musical. Where Western misconceptions about the nature of human musicality distance many individuals from meaningful engagement with an intrinsic part of their humanity, I challenge the status quo to argue for an inclusive educational practice which gives everyone an opportunity to ‘be’ musical. Despite evidence from neuroscience now supporting the understanding that humans are a musical species, the widespread neo-liberal oriented focus on vocational training fails to recognise music as an essential aspect (...)
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