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Nihilism Before Nietzsche

University of Chicago Press (1995)

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  1. The Theological Origins of Modernity.Michael Allen Gillespie - 1999 - Critical Review 13 (1-2):1-30.
    Most critiques of modernity rest on an inadequate understanding of its complexity. Modernity should be seen in terms of the question that guides modern thought. 77ns is the question of divine omnipotence that arises out of the nominalist destruction of Scholasticism. Humanism, Reformation Christianity, empiricsim, and rationalism are different responses to this question.
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  • John Paul II and the New Evangelization.Carole M. Brown & Kevin E. O'Reilly - 2015 - Heythrop Journal 56 (5):n/a-n/a.
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  • The Ontological Turn: Philosophical Sources of American Literary Theory.Henry McDonald - 2002 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 45 (1):3-33.
    The most important sources of contemporary American literary theory are neither the linguistics-based movement of French structuralism, as the term 'poststructuralism' implies, nor a 'modernity' that has been superseded, as the term 'postmodernism' implies, but rather a modernist tradition of aesthetics shaped by eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century German romanticism and idealism, movements that culminated in the work of Heidegger during the Weimar period between the World Wars and afterward, exercising an increasingly dominant influence on French theorists after World War II, (...)
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  • Sherlock Holmes, Crime, and the Anxieties of Globalization.Michael Allen Gillespie & John Samuel Harpham - 2011 - Critical Review 23 (4):449-474.
    Abstract Before the establishment in the early 1800s of France's Sûreté Nationale and England's Scotland Yard, the detection of crimes was generally regarded as supernatural work, but the rise of modern science allowed mere mortals to systematize and categorize events?and thus to solve crimes. Reducing the amount of crime, however, did not reduce the fear of crime, which actually grew in the late-nineteenth century as the result of globalization and media sensationalism. Literary detectives offered an imaginary cure for an imaginary (...)
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  • On Nietzsche’s Concept of ‘European Nihilism’.Ruth Burch - 2014 - European Review 22 (2):196-208.
    In Nietzsche, ‘European nihilism’ has at its core valuelessness, meaninglessness and senselessness. This article argues that Nietzsche is not replacing God with the nothing, but rather that he regards ‘European nihilism’ as an ‘in-between state’ that is necessary for getting beyond Christian morality. An important characteristic of a Nietzschean philosopher is his ‘will to responsibility’. One of his responsibilities consists of the creation of the values and the concepts that are needed in order to overcome the intermediate state of nihilism. (...)
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  • Asclepius Against the Crucified: Medical Nihilism and Incarnational Life in Death.Kimbell Kornu - 2017 - Christian Bioethics 23 (1):38-59.
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  • Nietzsche and the Premodernist Critique of Postmodernity.Michael Allen Gillespie - 1997 - Critical Review 11 (4):537-554.
    The crisis of modern reason culminates in Nietzsche's proclamation of nihilism. Drawing upon Nietzsche, postmodernists suggest that reason itself is defective, while “premodernists” argue we can regain our balance by returning to premodern rationalism. Peter Berkowitz suggests, however, that Nietzsche is a contradictory thinker who fails in his attempt to combine ancient rationalism with modern voluntarism. Postmodernism thus rests upon a defective foundation. Berkowitz's critique of postmodernism is telling, but he does not recognize dangerous millenarian elements in Nietzsche's thought. Moreover, (...)
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  • Attunement in the Modern Age.Janko M. Lozar - 2009 - Human Studies 32 (1):19-31.
    This contribution starts from Max Scheler’s claim that modern philosophy holds two differing views on feelings. The first view, which Scheler attributes to René Descartes, presents them in their intentional role but rejects their independence; the other view, which Scheler attributes to Immanuel Kant, holds that they cannot be reduced to the rational part of the soul and thus affirms their independence, but deprives them of all cognitive powers. After considering both views, I discuss the views of Franz Brentano and (...)
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  • Is Hegel's Master–Slave Dialectic a Refutation of Solipsism?Robert Stern - 2012 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 20 (2):333-361.
    This paper considers whether Hegel's master/slave dialectic in the Phenomenology of Spirit should be considered as a refutation of solipsism. It focuses on a recent and detailed attempt to argue for this sort of reading that has been proposed by Frederick Beiser ? but it argues that this reading is unconvincing, both in the historical motivations given for it in the work of Jacobi and Fichte, and as an interpretation of the text itself. An alternative reading of the dialectic is (...)
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  • The Christian Difference: Surviving Postmodernism.Stanley Hauerwas - 1999 - Cultural Values 3 (2):164-181.