Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Putting Together Connectionism – Again.Paul Smolensky - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (1):59-74.
  • The Reality of the Symbolic and Subsymbolic Systems.Andrew Woodfield & Adam Morton - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (1):58-58.
  • Has the Case Been Made Against the Ecumenical View of Connectionism?Robert Van Gulick - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (1):57-58.
  • The Essential Opacity of Modular Systems: Why Even Connectionism Cannot Give Complete Formal Accounts of Cognition.Marten J. den Uyl - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (1):56-57.
  • On the Proper Treatment of Thermostats.David S. Touretzky - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (1):55-56.
    A set of hypotheses is formulated for a connectionist approach to cognitive modeling. These hypotheses are shown to be incompatible with the hypotheses underlying traditional cognitive models. The connectionist models considered are massively parallel numerical computational systems that are a kind of continuous dynamical system. The numerical variables in the system correspond semantically to fine-grained features below the level of the concepts consciously used to describe the task domain. The level of analysis is intermediate between those of symbolic cognitive models (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • From Data to Dynamics: The Use of Multiple Levels of Analysis.Gregory O. Stone - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (1):54-55.
  • From Connectionism to Eliminativism.Stephen P. Stich - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (1):53-54.
  • How Fully Should Connectionism Be Activated? Two Sources of Excitation and One of Inhibition.Roger N. Shepard - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (1):52-52.
  • Structure and Controlling Subsymbolic Processing.Walter Schneider - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (1):51-52.
  • Making the Connections.Jay G. Rueckl - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (1):50-51.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Sanity Surrounded by Madness.Georges Rey - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (1):48-50.
  • A Two-Dimensional Array of Models of Cognitive Function.Gardner C. Quarton - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (1):48-48.
  • Subsymbols Aren't Much Good Outside of a Symbol-Processing Architecture.Alan Prince & Steven Pinker - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (1):46-47.
  • Connections Among Connections.R. J. Nelson - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (1):45-46.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • In Defence of Neurons.Chris Mortensen - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (1):44-45.
  • Epistemological Challenges for Connectionism.John McCarthy - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (1):44-44.
  • Symbols, Subsymbols, Neurons.William G. Lycan - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (1):43-44.
  • Connectionism in the Golden Age of Cognitive Science.Dan Lloyd - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (1):42-43.
  • Can This Treatment Raise the Dead?Robert K. Lindsay - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (1):41-42.
  • Physics, Cognition, and Connectionism: An Interdisciplinary Alchemy.Wendy G. Lehnert - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (1):40-41.
  • Smolensky, Semantics, and the Sensorimotor System.George Lakoff - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (1):39-40.
  • On the Obvious Treatment of Connectionism.Stephen José Hanson - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (1):38-39.
  • Some Memory, but No Mind.Lawrence E. Hunter - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (1):37-38.
  • Common Sense and Conceptual Halos.Douglas R. Hofstadter - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (1):35-37.
  • Statistical Rationality.Richard M. Golden - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (1):35-35.
  • Connectionism and the Study of Language.R. Freidin - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (1):34-35.
  • Dynamic Systems and the “Subsymbolic Level”.Walter J. Freeman - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (1):33-34.
  • On the Proper Treatment of Smolensky.Hubert L. Dreyfus & Stuart E. Dreyfus - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (1):31-32.
  • The Promise and Problems of Connectionism.Michael G. Dyer - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (1):32-33.
  • Some Assumptions Underlying Smolensky's Treatment of Connectionism.Eric Dietrich & Chris Fields - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (1):29-31.
  • Is Smolensky's Treatment of Connectionism on the Level?Carol E. Cleland - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (1):27-28.
  • The Psychological Appeal of Connectionism.Denise Dellarosa - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (1):28-29.
  • Information Processing Abstractions: The Message Still Counts More Than the Medium.B. Chandrasekaran, Ashok Goel & Dean Allemang - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (1):26-27.
  • Two Constructive Themes.Richard K. Belew - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (1):25-26.
  • Connectionism and Interlevel Relations.William Bechtel - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (1):24-25.
  • On the Proper Treatment of the Connection Between Connectionism and Symbolism.Louise Antony & Joseph Levine - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (1):23-24.
  • On the Proper Treatment of Connectionism.Paul Smolensky - 1988 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (1):1-23.
    A set of hypotheses is formulated for a connectionist approach to cognitive modeling. These hypotheses are shown to be incompatible with the hypotheses underlying traditional cognitive models. The connectionist models considered are massively parallel numerical computational systems that are a kind of continuous dynamical system. The numerical variables in the system correspond semantically to fine-grained features below the level of the concepts consciously used to describe the task domain. The level of analysis is intermediate between those of symbolic cognitive models (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   617 citations  
  • De-Centring the ‘Big Picture’: The Origins of Modern Science and the Modern Origins of Science.Andrew Cunningham & Perry Williams - 1993 - British Journal for the History of Science 26 (4):407-432.
    Like it or not, a big picture of the history of science is something which we cannot avoid. Big pictures are, of course, thoroughly out of fashion at the moment; those committed to specialist research find them simplistic and insufficiently complex and nuanced, while postmodernists regard them as simply impossible. But however specialist we may be in our research, however scornful of the immaturity of grand narratives, it is not so easy to escape from dependence – acknowledged or not – (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   61 citations