Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Creative Argumentation: When and Why People Commit the Metaphoric Fallacy.Francesca Ervas, Antonio Ledda, Amitash Ojha, Giuseppe Antonio Pierro & Bipin Indurkhya - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Reuniting Perception and Conception.Robert L. Goldstone & Lawrence W. Barsalou - 1998 - Cognition 65 (2-3):231-262.
  • Enhancement of Visual Attention Precedes the Emergence of Novel Metaphor Interpretations.Asuka Terai, Masanori Nakagawa, Takashi Kusumi, Yasuharu Koike & Koji Jimura - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Censoring Metaphors in Translation: Shakespeare's Hamlet Under Franco.Karen Sullivan & Elena Bandín - 2014 - Cognitive Linguistics 25 (2):177-202.
  • MAC/FAC: A Model of Similarity‐Based Retrieval.Kenneth D. Forbus, Dedre Gentner & Keith Law - 1995 - Cognitive Science 19 (2):141-205.
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   61 citations  
  • Metaphor and the 'Emergent Property' Problem: A Relevance-Theoretic Approach.Deirdre Wilson & Robyn Carston - 2007 - The Baltic International Yearbook of Cognition, Logic and Communication 3.
    The interpretation of metaphorical utterances often results in the attribution of emergent properties; these are properties which are neither standardly associated with the individual constituents of the utterance in isolation nor derivable by standard rules of semantic composition. For example, an utterance of ‘Robert is a bulldozer’ may be understood as attributing to Robert such properties as single-mindedness, insistence on having things done in his way, and insensitivity to the opinions/feelings of others, although none of these is included in the (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Resources for Research on Analogy: A Multi-Disciplinary Guide.Marcello Guarini, Amy Butchart, Paul Simard Smith & Andrei Moldovan - 2009 - Informal Logic 29 (2):84-197.
    Work on analogy has been done from a number of disciplinary perspectives throughout the history of Western thought. This work is a multidisciplinary guide to theorizing about analogy. It contains 1,406 references, primarily to journal articles and monographs, and primarily to English language material. classical through to contemporary sources are included. The work is classified into eight different sections (with a number of subsections). A brief introduction to each section is provided. Keywords and key expressions of importance to research on (...)
    Direct download (13 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  • Metaphoric Reference: An Eye Movement Analysis of Spanish–English and English–Spanish Bilingual Readers.Roberto R. Heredia & Anna B. Cieślicka - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Creation as Reconfiguration: Art in the Advancement of Science.Catherine Z. Elgin - 2002 - International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 16 (1):13 – 25.
    Cognitive advancement is not always a matter of acquiring new information. It often consists in reconfiguration--in reorganizing a domain so that hitherto overlooked or underemphasized features, patterns, opportunities, and resources come to light. Several modes of reconfiguration prominent in the arts--metaphor, fiction, exemplification, and perspective--play important roles in science as well. They do not perform the same roles as literal, descriptive, perspectiveless scientific truths. But to understand how science advances understanding, we need to appreciate the ineliminable cognitive contributions of non-literal, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • MACIFAC: A Model of Si~ I~ Ari~-~ s~ Retrieval.Kenneth D. Forsus, Dedre Gentner & L. A. W. Keith - 1994 - Cognitive Science 19:141-205.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Metaphor Between Embodiment and Imaginative Processes.Tiziana Giudice - 2008 - Anthropology and Philosophy 9 (1/2):42-57.
    In this paper I will analyse the relationship between metaphor and imagination. This issue has been recently studied by cognitive linguists who appreciate its importance, while other semantic perspectives neglect it. I will analyse the thesis which affirms that metaphors are based on cognitive components which are not logical-propositional but imaginative: the “image schemata” are recurrent models of corporeal experiences, centres of knowledge organization which structure – in a non-propositional form – an amount of salient information. This information emerges from (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Metaphor and Knowledge Change.Dedre Gentner & Phillip Wolff - 2000 - In Eric Dietrich Art Markman (ed.), Cognitive Dynamics: Conceptual Change in Humans and Machines. Lawrence Erlbaum. pp. 295--342.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  • Rating the Similarity of Simple Perceptual Stimuli: Asymmetries Induced by Manipulating Exposure Frequency.Thad A. Polk, Charles Behensky, Richard Gonzalez & Edward E. Smith - 2002 - Cognition 82 (3):B75-B88.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • The Life and Death of a Metaphor, or the Metaphysics of Metaphor.Josef Stern - 2007 - The Baltic International Yearbook of Cognition, Logic and Communication 3.
    This paper addresses two issues: what it is for a metaphor to be either alive or dead and what a metaphor must be in order to be either alive or dead. Both issues, in turn, bear on the contemporary debate whether metaphor is a pragmatic or semantic phenomenon and on the dispute between Contextualists and Literalists. In the first part of the paper, I survey examples of what I take to be live metaphors and dead metaphors in order to establish (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Structure-Mapping in Metaphor Comprehension.Phillip Wolff & Dedre Gentner - 2011 - Cognitive Science 35 (8):1456-1488.
    Metaphor has a double life. It can be described as a directional process in which a stable, familiar base domain provides inferential structure to a less clearly specified target. But metaphor is also described as a process of finding commonalities, an inherently symmetric process. In this second view, both concepts may be altered by the metaphorical comparison. Whereas most theories of metaphor capture one of these aspects, we offer a model based on structure-mapping that captures both sides of metaphor processing. (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  • Why Many Concepts Are Metaphorical.Raymond W. Gibbs - 1996 - Cognition 61 (3):309-319.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  • Analogy and Abstraction.Dedre Gentner & Christian Hoyos - 2017 - Topics in Cognitive Science 9 (3):672-693.
    A central question in human development is how young children gain knowledge so fast. We propose that analogical generalization drives much of this early learning and allows children to generate new abstractions from experience. In this paper, we review evidence for analogical generalization in both children and adults. We discuss how analogical processes interact with the child's changing knowledge base to predict the course of learning, from conservative to domain-general understanding. This line of research leads to challenges to existing assumptions (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Productivity and Schematicity in Metaphors.Timothy C. Clausner & William Croft - 1997 - Cognitive Science 21 (3):247-282.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Predication.Walter Kintsch - 2001 - Cognitive Science 25 (2):173-202.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   15 citations  
  • Familiarity, Priming, and Perception in Similarity Judgments.M. Hiatt Laura & J. Gregory Trafton - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (6):1450-1484.
    We present a novel way of accounting for similarity judgments. Our approach posits that similarity stems from three main sources—familiarity, priming, and inherent perceptual likeness. Here, we explore each of these constructs and demonstrate their individual and combined effectiveness in explaining similarity judgments. Using these three measures, our account of similarity explains ratings of simple, color-based perceptual stimuli that display asymmetry effects, as well as more complicated perceptual stimuli with structural properties; more traditional approaches to similarity solve one or the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Career of Metaphor.Brian F. Bowdle & Dedre Gentner - 2005 - Psychological Review 112 (1):193-216.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   63 citations  
  • Computational Exploration of Metaphor Comprehension Processes Using a Semantic Space Model.Akira Utsumi - 2011 - Cognitive Science 35 (2):251-296.
    Recent metaphor research has revealed that metaphor comprehension involves both categorization and comparison processes. This finding has triggered the following central question: Which property determines the choice between these two processes for metaphor comprehension? Three competing views have been proposed to answer this question: the conventionality view (Bowdle & Gentner, 2005), aptness view (Glucksberg & Haught, 2006b), and interpretive diversity view (Utsumi, 2007); these views, respectively, argue that vehicle conventionality, metaphor aptness, and interpretive diversity determine the choice between the categorization (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Metaphor in the Mind: The Cognition of Metaphor.Elisabeth Camp - 2006 - Philosophy Compass 1 (2):154-170.
    Philosophers have often adopted a dismissive attitude toward metaphor. Hobbes (1651, ch. 8) advocated excluding metaphors from rational discourse because they “openly profess deceit,” while Locke (1690, Bk. 3, ch. 10) claimed that figurative uses of language serve only “to insinuate wrong ideas, move the passions, and thereby mislead the judgment; and so indeed are perfect cheats.” Later, logical positivists like Ayer and Carnap assumed that because metaphors like..
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   13 citations  
  • Is an Apple Like a Fruit? A Study on Comparison and Categorisation Statements.Paula Rubio-Fernández, Bart Geurts & Chris Cummins - 2017 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 8 (2):367-390.
    Categorisation models of metaphor interpretation are based on the premiss that categorisation statements and comparison statements are fundamentally different types of assertion. Against this assumption, we argue that the difference is merely a quantitative one: ‘x is a y’ unilaterally entails ‘x is like a y’, and therefore the latter is merely weaker than the former. Moreover, if ‘x is like a y’ licenses the inference that x is not a y, then that inference is a scalar implicature. We defend (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Is the Mystery of Thought Demystified by Context‐Dependent Categorisation? Towards a New Relation Between Language and Thought.Michael S. C. Thomas, Harry R. M. Purser & Denis Mareschal - 2012 - Mind and Language 27 (5):595-618.
    We argue that are no such things as literal categories in human cognition. Instead, we argue that there are merely temporary coalescences of dimensions of similarity, which are brought together by context in order to create the similarity structure in mental representations appropriate for the task at hand. Fodor contends that context‐sensitive cognition cannot be realised by current computational theories of mind. We address this challenge by describing a simple computational implementation that exhibits internal knowledge representations whose similarity structure alters (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • On the Relation Between Metaphor and Simile: When Comparison Fails.Sam Glucksberg & Catrinel Haught - 2006 - Mind and Language 21 (3):360-378.
    Since Aristotle, many writers have treated metaphors and similes as equals: any metaphor can be paraphrased as a simile, and vice-versa. This property of metaphors is the basis for psycholinguistic comparison theories of metaphor comprehension. However, if metaphors cannot always be paraphrased as similes, then comparison theories must be abandoned. The different forms of a metaphor—the comparison and categorical forms—have different referents. In comparison form, the metaphor vehicle refers to the literal concept, e.g. 'in my lawyer is like a shark', (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  • Metaphor-Proof Expressions: A Dimensional Account of the Metaphorical Uninterpretability of Aesthetic Terms.Hanna Kim - 2015 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 73 (4):391-405.
    In this article, I start with the observation that aesthetic terms resist metaphorical interpretation; that is, it makes little sense to say that something is beautiful metaphorically speaking or to say something is metaphorically elegant, harmonious, or sublime. I argue that aesthetic terms’ lack of metaphorical interpretations is not explained by the fact that their applicability is not limited to a particular category of objects, at least in the standard sense of ‘category.’ In general, I challenge category-based accounts of metaphorical (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Conceptual Integration Networks.Gilles Fauconnier & Mark Turner - 1998 - Cognitive Science 22 (2):133-187.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   42 citations  
  • Metaphor, Relevance and the 'Emergent Property' Issue.Deirdre Wilson & Robyn Carston - 2006 - Mind and Language 21 (3):404–433.
    The interpretation of metaphorical utterances often results in the attribution of emergent properties, which are neither standardly associated with the individual constituents in isolation nor derivable by standard rules of semantic composition. An adequate pragmatic account of metaphor interpretation must explain how these properties are derived. Using the framework of relevance theory, we propose a wholly inferential account, and argue that the derivation of emergent properties involves no special interpretive mechanisms not required for the interpretation of ordinary, literal utterances.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   14 citations  
  • Metaphor and Metonymy: Making Their Connections More Slippery.John A. Barnden - 2010 - Cognitive Linguistics 21 (1):1-34.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Reconstructing Metaphorical Meaning.Fabrizio Macagno & Benedetta Zavatta - 2014 - Argumentation 28 (4):453-488.
    Metaphorical meaning can be analyzed as triggered by an apparent communicative breach, an incongruity that leads to a default of the presumptive interpretation of a vehicle. This breach can be solved through contextual renegotiations of meaning guided by the communicative intention, or rather the presumed purpose of the metaphorical utterance. This paper addresses the problem of analyzing the complex process of reasoning underlying the reconstruction of metaphorical meaning. This process will be described as a type of abductive argument, aimed at (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations