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  1. Information Compression as a Unifying Principle in Human Learning, Perception, and Cognition.J. Gerard Wolff - 2019 - Complexity 2019:1-38.
    This paper describes a novel perspective on the foundations of mathematics: how mathematics may be seen to be largely about “information compression via the matching and unification of patterns”. That is itself a novel approach to IC, couched in terms of nonmathematical primitives, as is necessary in any investigation of the foundations of mathematics. This new perspective on the foundations of mathematics reflects the facts that mathematics is almost exclusively the product of human brains, and has been developed, as an (...)
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  • An Active Symbols Theory of Chess Intuition.Alexandre Linhares - 2005 - Minds and Machines 15 (2):131-181.
    The well-known game of chess has traditionally been modeled in artificial intelligence studies by search engines with advanced pruning techniques. The models were thus centered on an inference engine manipulating passive symbols in the form of tokens. It is beyond doubt, however, that human players do not carry out such processes. Instead, chess masters instead carry out perceptual processes, carefully categorizing the chunks perceived in a position and gradually building complex dynamic structures to represent the subtle pressures embedded in the (...)
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  • Archaeology and the Evolutionary Neuroscience of Language.Dietrich Stout - 2018 - Interaction Studies: Social Behaviour and Communication in Biological and Artificial Systems 19 (1-2):256-271.
    Comparative approaches to language evolution are essential but cannot by themselves resolve the timing and context of evolutionary events since the last common ancestor with chimpanzees. Archaeology can help to fill this gap, but only if properly integrated with evolutionary theory and the ethnographic, ethological, and experimental analogies required to reconstruct the broader social, behavioral, and neurocognitive implications of ancient artifacts. The current contribution elaborates a technological pedagogy hypothesis of language origins by developing the concept of an evolving human technological (...)
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  • Three Views on Expertise: Philosophical Implications for Rationality, Knowledge, Intuition and Education.Fernand Gobet - 2017 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 51 (3):605-619.
  • The Role of Multiword Building Blocks in Explaining L1–L2 Differences.Inbal Arnon & Morten H. Christiansen - 2017 - Topics in Cognitive Science 9 (3):621-636.
    Why are children better language learners than adults despite being worse at a range of other cognitive tasks? Here, we explore the role of multiword sequences in explaining L1–L2 differences in learning. In particular, we propose that children and adults differ in their reliance on such multiword units in learning, and that this difference affects learning strategies and outcomes, and leads to difficulty in learning certain grammatical relations. In the first part, we review recent findings that suggest that MWUs play (...)
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  • Offline Optimization of the Relative Timing of Movements in a Sequence Is Blocked by Retroactive Behavioral Interference.Jason Friedman & Maria Korman - 2016 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 10.
  • The Racer’s Brain – How Domain Expertise is Reflected in the Neural Substrates of Driving.Otto Lappi - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  • The Now-or-Never Bottleneck: A Fundamental Constraint on Language.Morten H. Christiansen & Nick Chater - 2016 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 39:1-52.
    Memory is fleeting. New material rapidly obliterates previous material. How, then, can the brain deal successfully with the continual deluge of linguistic input? We argue that, to deal with this “Now-or-Never” bottleneck, the brain must compress and recode linguistic input as rapidly as possible. This observation has strong implications for the nature of language processing: the language system must “eagerly” recode and compress linguistic input; as the bottleneck recurs at each new representational level, the language system must build a multilevel (...)
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  • Optimizing Performative Skills in Social Interaction: Insights From Embodied Cognition, Music Education, and Sport Psychology.Andrea Schiavio, Vincent Gesbert, Mark Reybrouck, Denis Hauw & Richard Parncutt - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
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  • Science and the Special Composition Question.Andrew Brenner - 2018 - Synthese 195 (2):657-678.
    Mereological nihilism is the thesis that composition never occurs. Some philosophers have thought that science gives us compelling evidence against nihilism. In this article I respond to this concern. An initial challenge for nihilism stems from the fact that composition is such a ubiquitous feature of scientific theories. In response I motivate a restricted form of scientific anti-realism with respect to those components of scientific theories which make reference to composition. A second scientifically based worry for nihilism is that certain (...)
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  • Sparse Distributed Memory: Understanding the Speed and Robustness of Expert Memory.Marcelo S. Brogliato, Daniel M. Chada & Alexandre Linhares - 2014 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.
  • Compression in Visual Working Memory: Using Statistical Regularities to Form More Efficient Memory Representations.Timothy F. Brady, Talia Konkle & George A. Alvarez - 2009 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 138 (4):487-502.
  • Developmental Abilities to Form Chunks in Immediate Memory and Its Non-Relationship to Span Development.Fabien Mathy, Michael Fartoukh, Nicolas Gauvrit & Alessandro Guida - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
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  • What's in a Name? The Multiple Meanings of “Chunk” and “Chunking”.Fernand Gobet, Martyn Lloyd-Kelly & Peter C. R. Lane - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
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  • Questioning Short-Term Memory and its Measurement: Why Digit Span Measures Long-Term Associative Learning.Gary Jones & Bill Macken - 2015 - Cognition 144:1-13.
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  • Motor Skill Learning Between Selection and Execution.Jörn Diedrichsen & Katja Kornysheva - 2015 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 19 (4):227-233.
  • Segmentation in the Perception and Memory of Events.Christopher A. Kurby & Jeffrey M. Zacks - 2008 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 12 (2):72-79.
  • Emergence of Rhythm During Motor Learning.Katsuyuki Sakai, Okihide Hikosaka & Kae Nakamura - 2004 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 8 (12):547-553.
  • Event Segmentation Ability Uniquely Predicts Event Memory.Jesse Q. Sargent, Jeffrey M. Zacks, David Z. Hambrick, Rose T. Zacks, Christopher A. Kurby, Heather R. Bailey, Michelle L. Eisenberg & Taylor M. Beck - 2013 - Cognition 129 (2):241-255.
  • Separating Cognitive Capacity From Knowledge: A New Hypothesis.Glenda Andrews Graeme S. Halford, Nelson Cowan - 2007 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 11 (6):236.
  • Expertise and Intuition: A Tale of Three Theories. [REVIEW]Fernand Gobet & Philippe Chassy - 2009 - Minds and Machines 19 (2):151-180.
    Several authors have hailed intuition as one of the defining features of expertise. In particular, while disagreeing on almost anything that touches on human cognition and artificial intelligence, Hubert Dreyfus and Herbert Simon agreed on this point. However, the highly influential theories of intuition they proposed differed in major ways, especially with respect to the role given to search and as to whether intuition is holistic or analytic. Both theories suffer from empirical weaknesses. In this paper, we show how, with (...)
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  • The Time Course and Characteristics of Procedural Learning in Schizophrenia Patients and Healthy Individuals.Yael Adini, Yoram S. Bonneh, Seva Komm, Lisa Deutsch & David Israeli - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  • Becoming an Expert: Ontogeny of Expertise as an Example of Neural Reuse.Alessandro Guida, Guillermo Campitelli & Fernand Gobet - 2016 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 39.
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  • Debunking Rationalist Defenses of Common-Sense Ontology: An Empirical Approach.Robert Carry Osborne - 2016 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 7 (1):197-221.
    Debunking arguments typically attempt to show that a set of beliefs or other intensional mental states bear no appropriate explanatory connection to the facts they purport to be about. That is, a debunking argument will attempt to show that beliefs about p are not held because of the facts about p. Such beliefs, if true, would then only be accidentally so. Thus, their causal origins constitute an undermining defeater. Debunking arguments arise in various philosophical domains, targeting beliefs about morality, the (...)
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  • Cognitive Science: Emerging Perspectives and Approaches.Narayanan Srinivasan - 2011 - In Girishwar Misra (ed.), Handbook of Psychology in India. Oxford University Press. pp. 46--57.
  • Why Good Thoughts Block Better Ones: The Mechanism of the Pernicious Einstellung Effect.Merim Bilalić, Peter McLeod & Fernand Gobet - 2008 - Cognition 108 (3):652-661.
  • Codes and Their Vicissitudes.Bernhard Hommel, Jochen Müsseler, Gisa Aschersleben & Wolfgang Prinz - 2001 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (5):910-926.
    First, we discuss issues raised with respect to the Theory of Event Coding (TEC)'s scope, that is, its limitations and possible extensions. Then, we address the issue of specificity, that is, the widespread concern that TEC is too unspecified and, therefore, too vague in a number of important respects. Finally, we elaborate on our views about TEC's relations to other important frameworks and approaches in the field like stages models, ecological approaches, and the two-visual-pathways model. Footnotes1 We acknowledge the precedence (...)
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  • Models of Misbelief: Integrating Motivational and Deficit Theories of Delusions.Ryan McKay, Robyn Langdon & Max Coltheart - 2007 - Consciousness and Cognition 16 (4):932-941.
    The impact of our desires and preferences upon our ordinary, everyday beliefs is well-documented [Gilovich, T. . How we know what isn’t so: The fallibility of human reason in everyday life. New York: The Free Press.]. The influence of such motivational factors on delusions, which are instances of pathological misbelief, has tended however to be neglected by certain prevailing models of delusion formation and maintenance. This paper explores a distinction between two general classes of theoretical explanation for delusions; the motivational (...)
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  • A General Structure for Legal Arguments About Evidence Using Bayesian Networks.Norman Fenton, Martin Neil & David A. Lagnado - 2013 - Cognitive Science 37 (1):61-102.
    A Bayesian network (BN) is a graphical model of uncertainty that is especially well suited to legal arguments. It enables us to visualize and model dependencies between different hypotheses and pieces of evidence and to calculate the revised probability beliefs about all uncertain factors when any piece of new evidence is presented. Although BNs have been widely discussed and recently used in the context of legal arguments, there is no systematic, repeatable method for modeling legal arguments as BNs. Hence, where (...)
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  • Sequential Learning in Non-Human Primates.Christopher M. Conway & Morten H. Christiansen - 2001 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 5 (12):539-546.
  • The Racer's Mind—How Core Perceptual-Cognitive Expertise Is Reflected in Deliberate Practice Procedures in Professional Motorsport.Otto Lappi - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  • Chunks, Schemata, and Retrieval Structures: Past and Current Computational Models.Fernand Gobet, Peter C. R. Lane & Martyn Lloyd-Kelly - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  • How Should We Measure Chunks? A Continuing Issue in Chunking Research and a Way Forward.Amanda L. Gilchrist - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  • MDLChunker: A MDL-Based Cognitive Model of Inductive Learning.Vivien Robinet, Benoît Lemaire & Mirta B. Gordon - 2011 - Cognitive Science 35 (7):1352-1389.
    This paper presents a computational model of the way humans inductively identify and aggregate concepts from the low-level stimuli they are exposed to. Based on the idea that humans tend to select the simplest structures, it implements a dynamic hierarchical chunking mechanism in which the decision whether to create a new chunk is based on an information-theoretic criterion, the Minimum Description Length (MDL) principle. We present theoretical justifications for this approach together with results of an experiment in which participants, exposed (...)
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  • Sculpting the Space of Actions. Explaining Human Action by Integrating Intentions and Mechanisms.Machiel Keestra - 2014 - Dissertation, University of Amsterdam
    How can we explain the intentional nature of an expert’s actions, performed without immediate and conscious control, relying instead on automatic cognitive processes? How can we account for the differences and similarities with a novice’s performance of the same actions? Can a naturalist explanation of intentional expert action be in line with a philosophical concept of intentional action? Answering these and related questions in a positive sense, this dissertation develops a three-step argument. Part I considers different methods of explanations in (...)
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  • Understanding and Resolving Failures in Human-Robot Interaction: Literature Review and Model Development.Shanee Honig & Tal Oron-Gilad - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
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  • Chunk Formation in Immediate Memory and How It Relates to Data Compression.Mustapha Chekaf, Nelson Cowan & Fabien Mathy - 2016 - Cognition 155:96-107.
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  • Late Positive Slow Waves as Markers of Chunking During Encoding.Ana M. L. Nogueira, Orlando F. A. Bueno, Gilberto M. Manzano, André F. Kohn & Sabine Pompéia - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  • Modeling the Development of Children's Use of Optional Infinitives in Dutch and English Using MOSAIC.Daniel Freudenthal, Julian M. Pine & Fernand Gobet - 2006 - Cognitive Science 30 (2):277-310.
    In this study we use a computational model of language learning called model of syntax acquisition in children (MOSAIC) to investigate the extent to which the optional infinitive (OI) phenomenon in Dutch and English can be explained in terms of a resource-limited distributional analysis of Dutch and English child-directed speech. The results show that the same version of MOSAIC is able to simulate changes in the pattern of finiteness marking in 2 children learning Dutch and 2 children learning English as (...)
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  • Lexical and Sublexical Units in Speech Perception.Ibrahima Giroux & Arnaud Rey - 2009 - Cognitive Science 33 (2):260-272.
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  • Investigating Implicit Statistical Learning Mechanisms Through Contextual Cueing.Annabelle Goujon, André Didierjean & Simon Thorpe - 2015 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 19 (9):524-533.
  • From Amateur to Professional: A Neuro-Cognitive Model of Categories and Expert Development. [REVIEW]Michael S. Harré - 2013 - Minds and Machines 23 (4):443-472.
    The ability to group perceptual objects into functionally relevant categories is vital to our comprehension of the world. Such categorisation aids in how we search for objects in familiar scenes and how we identify an object and its likely uses despite never having seen that specific object before. The systems that mediate this process are only now coming to be understood through considerable research efforts combining neurological, psychological and behavioural studies. What is much less well understood are the differences between (...)
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  • Game‐XP: Action Games as Experimental Paradigms for Cognitive Science.Wayne D. Gray - 2017 - Topics in Cognitive Science 9 (2):289-307.
    Why games? How could anyone consider action games an experimental paradigm for Cognitive Science? In 1973, as one of three strategies he proposed for advancing Cognitive Science, Allen Newell exhorted us to “accept a single complex task and do all of it.” More specifically, he told us that rather than taking an “experimental psychology as usual approach,” we should “focus on a series of experimental and theoretical studies around a single complex task” so as to demonstrate that our theories of (...)
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  • The Case for Moral Perception.J. Jeremy Wisnewski - 2015 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 14 (1):129-148.
    In this paper, I defend the view that we can literally perceive the morally right and wrong, or something near enough. In defending this claim, I will try to meet three primary objectives: to clarify how an investigation into moral phenomenology should proceed, to respond to a number of misconceptions and objections that are most frequently raised against the very idea of moral perception, and to provide a model for how some moral perception can be seen as literal perception. Because (...)
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  • The Influence of Children’s Exposure to Language From Two to Six Years: The Case of Nonword Repetition.Gary Jones - 2016 - Cognition 153:79-88.
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  • Simulating the Cross-Linguistic Pattern of Optional Infinitive Errors in Children’s Declaratives and Wh- Questions.Daniel Freudenthal, Julian M. Pine, Gary Jones & Fernand Gobet - 2015 - Cognition 143:61-76.
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  • Style, but Substance: An Epistemology of Visual Versus Numerical Representation in Scientific Practice.Zachary C. Irving - 2011 - Philosophy of Science 78 (5):774-787.
  • Separating Cognitive Capacity From Knowledge: A New Hypothesis.Graeme S. Halford, Nelson Cowan & Glenda Andrews - 2007 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 11 (6):236-242.
  • What’s Magic About Magic Numbers? Chunking and Data Compression in Short-Term Memory.Fabien Mathy & Jacob Feldman - 2012 - Cognition 122 (3):346-362.
  • Spatial Cognition Through the Keyhole: How Studying a Real-World Domain Can Inform Basic Science—and Vice Versa.Madeleine Keehner - 2011 - Topics in Cognitive Science 3 (4):632-647.
    This paper discusses spatial cognition in the domain of minimally invasive surgery. It draws on studies from this domain to shed light on a range of spatial cognitive processes and to consider individual differences in performance. In relation to modeling, the aim is to identify potential opportunities for characterizing the complex interplay between perception, action, and cognition, and to consider how theoretical models of the relevant processes might prove valuable for addressing applied questions about surgical performance and training.
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