Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Unconscious Influences on Decision Making: A Critical Review.Ben R. Newell & David R. Shanks - 2014 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 37 (2):1-19.
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   52 citations  
  • Virtues for Agents in Directed Social Networks.Mark Alfano - forthcoming - Synthese.
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Ignorant Cognition: A Response to Copeland, Ervas, and Osta-Vélez. [REVIEW]Selene Arfini - 2021 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 40 (2):237-241.
    Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Book: Cognitive Design for Artificial Minds.Antonio Lieto - 2021 - London, UK: Routledge, Taylor & Francis Ltd.
    Book Description (Blurb): Cognitive Design for Artificial Minds explains the crucial role that human cognition research plays in the design and realization of artificial intelligence systems, illustrating the steps necessary for the design of artificial models of cognition. It bridges the gap between the theoretical, experimental and technological issues addressed in the context of AI of cognitive inspiration and computational cognitive science. -/- Beginning with an overview of the historical, methodological and technical issues in the field of Cognitively-Inspired Artificial Intelligence, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • A Tutorial Introduction to Bayesian Models of Cognitive Development.Amy Perfors, Joshua B. Tenenbaum, Thomas L. Griffiths & Fei Xu - 2011 - Cognition 120 (3):302-321.
  • The Past of Predicting the Future: A Review of the Multidisciplinary History of Affective Forecasting.Maya A. Pilin - forthcoming - History of the Human Sciences:095269512097633.
    Affective forecasting refers to the ability to predict future emotions, a skill that is essential to making decisions on a daily basis. Studies of the concept have determined that individuals are often inaccurate in making such affective forecasts. However, the mechanisms of these errors are not yet clear. In order to better understand why affective forecasting errors occur, this article seeks to trace the theoretical roots of this theory with a focus on its multidisciplinary history. The roots of affective forecasting (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Web‐Based Experiments for the Study of Collective Social Dynamics in Cultural Markets.Matthew J. Salganik & Duncan J. Watts - 2009 - Topics in Cognitive Science 1 (3):439-468.
  • How to Explain Behavior?Gerd Gigerenzer - 2020 - Topics in Cognitive Science 12 (4):1363-1381.
    Unlike behaviorism, cognitive psychology relies on mental concepts to explain behavior. Yet mental processes are not directly observable and multiple explanations are possible, which poses a challenge for finding a useful framework. In this article, I distinguish three new frameworks for explanations that emerged after the cognitive revolution. The first is called tools‐to‐theories: Psychologists' new tools for data analysis, such as computers and statistics, are turned into theories of mind. The second proposes as‐if theories: Expected utility theory and Bayesian statistics (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • The Interpretation of Uncertainty in Ecological Rationality.Anastasia Kozyreva & Ralph Hertwig - 2019 - Synthese 198 (2):1517-1547.
    Despite the ubiquity of uncertainty, scientific attention has focused primarily on probabilistic approaches, which predominantly rely on the assumption that uncertainty can be measured and expressed numerically. At the same time, the increasing amount of research from a range of areas including psychology, economics, and sociology testify that in the real world, people’s understanding of risky and uncertain situations cannot be satisfactorily explained in probabilistic and decision-theoretical terms. In this article, we offer a theoretical overview of an alternative approach to (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • A Dynamical Perspective on the Generality Problem.Andreas Stephens, Trond A. Tjøstheim, Maximilian K. Roszko & Erik J. Olsson - forthcoming - Acta Analytica:1-14.
    The generality problem is commonly considered to be a critical difficulty for reliabilism. In this paper, we present a dynamical perspective on the problem in the spirit of naturalized epistemology. According to this outlook, it is worth investigating how token belief-forming processes instantiate specific types in the biological agent’s cognitive architecture and background experience, consisting in the process of attractor-guided neural activation. While our discussion of the generality problem assigns “scientific types” to token processes, it represents a unified account in (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Ecological Rationality of Explanatory Reasoning.Igor Douven - 2020 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 79:1-14.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Epistemic Status of Processing Fluency as Source for Judgments of Truth.Rolf Reber & Christian Unkelbach - 2010 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 1 (4):563-581.
    This article combines findings from cognitive psychology on the role of processing fluency in truth judgments with epistemological theory on justification of belief. We first review evidence that repeated exposure to a statement increases the subjective ease with which that statement is processed. This increased processing fluency, in turn, increases the probability that the statement is judged to be true. The basic question discussed here is whether the use of processing fluency as a cue to truth is epistemically justified. In (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   19 citations  
  • Subjective Moral Biases & Fallacies: Developing Scientifically & Practically Adequate Moral Analogues of Cognitive Heuristics & Biases.Mark H. Herman - 2019 - Dissertation, Bowling Green State University
    In this dissertation, I construct scientifically and practically adequate moral analogs of cognitive heuristics and biases. Cognitive heuristics are reasoning “shortcuts” that are efficient but flawed. Such flaws yield systematic judgment errors—i.e., cognitive biases. For example, the availability heuristic infers an event’s probability by seeing how easy it is to recall similar events. Since dramatic events, such as airplane crashes, are disproportionately easy to recall, this heuristic explains systematic overestimations of their probability (availability bias). The research program on cognitive heuristics (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Pseudo‐Mechanistic Explanations in Psychology and Cognitive Neuroscience.Bernhard Hommel - 2020 - Topics in Cognitive Science 12 (4):1294-1305.
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Formal Versus Bounded Norms in the Psychology of Rationality: Toward a Multilevel Analysis of Their Relationship.Thomas Sturm - 2019 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 49 (3):190-209.
    It is often claimed that formal and optimizing norms of the standard conception of rationality and the heuristics of the bounded rationality approach are at odds with one another. This claim, I arg...
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Models of Cognition and Their Applications in Behavioral Economics: A Conceptual Framework for Nudging Derived From Behavior Analysis and Relational Frame Theory.Marco Tagliabue, Valeria Squatrito & Giovambattista Presti - 2019 - Frontiers in Psychology 10.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • How Intractability Spans the Cognitive and Evolutionary Levels of Explanation.Patricia Rich, Mark Blokpoel, Ronald Haan & Iris Rooij - 2020 - Topics in Cognitive Science 12 (4):1382-1402.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • The Relative Success of Recognition-Based Inference in Multichoice Decisions.Rachel McCloy, C. Philip Beaman & Philip T. Smith - 2008 - Cognitive Science 32 (6):1037-1048.
  • Implications of Cognitive Load for Hypothesis Generation and Probability Judgment.Amber M. Sprenger, Michael R. Dougherty, Sharona M. Atkins, Ana M. Franco-Watkins, Rick P. Thomas, Nicholas Lange & Brandon Abbs - 2011 - Frontiers in Psychology 2.
  • The Power of Simplicity: A Fast-and-Frugal Heuristics Approach to Performance Science.Markus Raab & Gerd Gigerenzer - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
  • A Blind Spot in Research on Foreign Language Effects in Judgment and Decision-Making.Andrea Polonioli - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Commentary: Folk-Economic Beliefs: An Evolutionary Cognitive Model.Tobias Otterbring & Panagiotis Mitkidis - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • A Neural Network Framework for Cognitive Bias.Johan E. Korteling, Anne-Marie Brouwer & Alexander Toet - 2018 - Frontiers in Psychology 9.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Sound Mind, Irrational Behavior?R. Kim Guenther & Matthew H. Olson - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Deciding for Future Selves Reduces Loss Aversion.Qiqi Cheng & Guibing He - 2017 - Frontiers in Psychology 8.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Homo Heuristicus Outnumbered: Comment on Gigerenzer and Brighton (2009).Benjamin E. Hilbig & Tobias Richter - 2011 - Topics in Cognitive Science 3 (1):187-196.
    Gigerenzer and Brighton (2009) have argued for a “Homo heuristicus” view of judgment and decision making, claiming that there is evidence for a majority of individuals using fast and frugal heuristics. In this vein, they criticize previous studies that tested the descriptive adequacy of some of these heuristics. In addition, they provide a reanalysis of experimental data on the recognition heuristic that allegedly supports Gigerenzer and Brighton’s view of pervasive reliance on heuristics. However, their arguments and reanalyses are both conceptually (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Homo Heuristicus: Why Biased Minds Make Better Inferences.Gerd Gigerenzer & Henry Brighton - 2009 - Topics in Cognitive Science 1 (1):107-143.
    Heuristics are efficient cognitive processes that ignore information. In contrast to the widely held view that less processing reduces accuracy, the study of heuristics shows that less information, computation, and time can in fact improve accuracy. We review the major progress made so far: the discovery of less-is-more effects; the study of the ecological rationality of heuristics, which examines in which environments a given strategy succeeds or fails, and why; an advancement from vague labels to computational models of heuristics; the (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   109 citations  
  • Towards Competitive Instead of Biased Testing of Heuristics: A Reply to Hilbig and Richter (2011).Henry Brighton & Gerd Gigerenzer - 2011 - Topics in Cognitive Science 3 (1):197-205.
    Our programmatic article on Homo heuristicus (Gigerenzer & Brighton, 2009) included a methodological section specifying three minimum criteria for testing heuristics: competitive tests, individual-level tests, and tests of adaptive selection of heuristics. Using Richter and Späth’s (2006) study on the recognition heuristic, we illustrated how violations of these criteria can lead to unsupported conclusions. In their comment, Hilbig and Richter conduct a reanalysis, but again without competitive testing. They neither test nor specify the compensatory model of inference they argue for. (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • A Large‐Scale Analysis of Variance in Written Language.Brendan T. Johns & Randall K. Jamieson - 2018 - Cognitive Science 42 (4):1360-1374.
    The collection of very large text sources has revolutionized the study of natural language, leading to the development of several models of language learning and distributional semantics that extract sophisticated semantic representations of words based on the statistical redundancies contained within natural language. The models treat knowledge as an interaction of processing mechanisms and the structure of language experience. But language experience is often treated agnostically. We report a distributional semantic analysis that shows written language in fiction books varies appreciably (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Memory‐Based Simple Heuristics as Attribute Substitution: Competitive Tests of Binary Choice Inference Models.Honda Hidehito, Matsuka Toshihiko & Ueda Kazuhiro - 2017 - Cognitive Science 41 (S5):1093-1118.
    Some researchers on binary choice inference have argued that people make inferences based on simple heuristics, such as recognition, fluency, or familiarity. Others have argued that people make inferences based on available knowledge. To examine the boundary between heuristic and knowledge usage, we examine binary choice inference processes in terms of attribute substitution in heuristic use. In this framework, it is predicted that people will rely on heuristic or knowledge-based inference depending on the subjective difficulty of the inference task. We (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Not so Fast! : Rethinking the Recognition Heuristic.Daniel M. Oppenheimer - 2003 - Cognition 90 (1):B1-B9.
  • Naturalistic Multiattribute Choice.Sudeep Bhatia & Neil Stewart - 2018 - Cognition 179:71-88.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • A Hierarchical Bayesian Modeling Approach to Searching and Stopping in Multi-Attribute Judgment.Don van Ravenzwaaij, Chris P. Moore, Michael D. Lee & Ben R. Newell - 2014 - Cognitive Science 38 (7):1384-1405.
    In most decision-making situations, there is a plethora of information potentially available to people. Deciding what information to gather and what to ignore is no small feat. How do decision makers determine in what sequence to collect information and when to stop? In two experiments, we administered a version of the German cities task developed by Gigerenzer and Goldstein (1996), in which participants had to decide which of two cities had the larger population. Decision makers were not provided with the (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Use of Recognition in Group Decision‐Making.Torsten Reimer & Konstantinos V. Katsikopoulos - 2004 - Cognitive Science 28 (6):1009-1029.
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Language Encodes Geographical Information.Max M. Louwerse & Rolf A. Zwaan - 2009 - Cognitive Science 33 (1):51-73.
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  • The Wisdom of Individuals: Exploring People's Knowledge About Everyday Events Using Iterated Learning.Stephan Lewandowsky, Thomas L. Griffiths & Michael L. Kalish - 2009 - Cognitive Science 33 (6):969-998.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  • The Adaptive Use of Recognition in Group Decision Making.Juliane E. Kämmer, Wolfgang Gaissmaier, Torsten Reimer & Carsten C. Schermuly - 2014 - Cognitive Science 38 (5):911-942.
    Applying the framework of ecological rationality, the authors studied the adaptivity of group decision making. In detail, they investigated whether groups apply decision strategies conditional on their composition in terms of task-relevant features. The authors focused on the recognition heuristic, so the task-relevant features were the validity of the group members' recognition and knowledge, which influenced the potential performance of group strategies. Forty-three three-member groups performed an inference task in which they had to infer which of two German companies had (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Long Live the King! Beginnings Loom Larger Than Endings of Past and Recurrent Events.Karl Halvor Teigen, Gisela Böhm, Susanne Bruckmüller, Peter Hegarty & Olivier Luminet - 2017 - Cognition 163:26-41.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Strategies for Memory-Based Decision Making: Modeling Behavioral and Neural Signatures Within a Cognitive Architecture.Hanna B. Fechner, Thorsten Pachur, Lael J. Schooler, Katja Mehlhorn, Ceren Battal, Kirsten G. Volz & Jelmer P. Borst - 2016 - Cognition 157:77-99.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  • Arguing to Defeat: Eristic Argumentation and Irrationality in Resolving Moral Concerns.Rasim Serdar Kurdoglu & Nüfer Yasin Ateş - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • The Evolution of Misbelief.Ryan T. McKay & Daniel C. Dennett - 2009 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (6):493.
    From an evolutionary standpoint, a default presumption is that true beliefs are adaptive and misbeliefs maladaptive. But if humans are biologically engineered to appraise the world accurately and to form true beliefs, how are we to explain the routine exceptions to this rule? How can we account for mistaken beliefs, bizarre delusions, and instances of self-deception? We explore this question in some detail. We begin by articulating a distinction between two general types of misbelief: those resulting from a breakdown in (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   107 citations  
  • When is Mindreading Accurate? A Commentary on Shannon Spaulding’s How We Understand Others: Philosophy and Social Cognition. [REVIEW]Evan Westra - 2020 - Philosophical Psychology 33 (6):868-882.
    In How We Understand Others: Philosophy and Social Cognition, Shannon Spaulding develops a novel account of social cognition with pessimistic implications for mindreading accuracy: according to Spaulding, mistakes in mentalizing are much more common than traditional theories of mindreading commonly assume. In this commentary, I push against Spaulding’s pessimism from two directions. First, I argue that a number of the heuristic mindreading strategies that Spaulding views as especially error prone might be quite reliable in practice. Second, I argue that current (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Normative Ecological Rationality: Normative Rationality in the Fast-and-Frugal-Heuristics Research Program.D. Wade Hands - 2014 - Journal of Economic Methodology 21 (4):396-410.
    The purpose of this paper is to examine the normative interpretation of the fast-and-frugal research program and in particular to contrast it with the normative reading of rational choice theory and behavioral economics. The ecological rationality of fast-and-frugal heuristics is admittedly a form of normative naturalism – it derives what agents “ought” to do from that which “is” ecologically rational – and the paper will examine how this differs from the normative rationality associated with rational choice theory. I will also (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  • Come Now, Let Us Reason Together.Austin Dacey - 2020 - Informal Logic 40 (1):47-76.
    In defending a new framework for incorporating metacognitive debiasing strategies into critical thinking education, Jeffrey Maynes draws on ecological rationality theory to argue that in felicitous environments, agents will achieve greater epistemic success by relying on heuristics rather than more ideally rational procedures. He considers a challenge presented by Mercier and Sperber’s “interactionist” thesis that individual biases contribute to successful group reasoning. I argue that the challenge can be met without assuming an individualist ideal of the critical thinker as a (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Literal Perceptual Inference.Alex Kiefer - 2017 - In Thomas Metzinger & Wanja Wiese (eds.), Philosophy and predictive processing. Frankfurt, Germany:
    In this paper, I argue that theories of perception that appeal to Helmholtz’s idea of unconscious inference (“Helmholtzian” theories) should be taken literally, i.e. that the inferences appealed to in such theories are inferences in the full sense of the term, as employed elsewhere in philosophy and in ordinary discourse. -/- In the course of the argument, I consider constraints on inference based on the idea that inference is a deliberate acton, and on the idea that inferences depend on the (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  • Intuitive and Deliberate Judgments Are Based on Common Principles.Arie W. Kruglanski & Gerd Gigerenzer - 2011 - Psychological Review 118 (1):97-109.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   59 citations  
  • Two-Stage Dynamic Signal Detection: A Theory of Choice, Decision Time, and Confidence.Timothy J. Pleskac & Jerome R. Busemeyer - 2010 - Psychological Review 117 (3):864-901.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   43 citations  
  • How (Far) Can Rationality Be Naturalized?Gerd Gigerenzer & Thomas Sturm - 2012 - Synthese 187 (1):243-268.
    The paper shows why and how an empirical study of fast-and-frugal heuristics can provide norms of good reasoning, and thus how (and how far) rationality can be naturalized. We explain the heuristics that humans often rely on in solving problems, for example, choosing investment strategies or apartments, placing bets in sports, or making library searches. We then show that heuristics can lead to judgments that are as accurate as or even more accurate than strategies that use more information and computation, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   29 citations  
  • False Beliefs and Naive Beliefs: They Can Be Good for You.Roberto Casati & Marco Bertamini - 2009 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (6):512-513.
    Naive physics beliefs can be systematically mistaken. They provide a useful test-bed because they are common, and also because their existence must rely on some adaptive advantage, within a given context. In the second part of the commentary we also ask questions about when a whole family of misbeliefs should be considered together as a single phenomenon.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Précis of Neuroconstructivism: How the Brain Constructs Cognition.Sylvain Sirois, Michael Spratling, Michael S. C. Thomas, Gert Westermann, Denis Mareschal & Mark H. Johnson - 2008 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (3):321-331.
    Neuroconstructivism: How the Brain Constructs Cognition proposes a unifying framework for the study of cognitive development that brings together (1) constructivism (which views development as the progressive elaboration of increasingly complex structures), (2) cognitive neuroscience (which aims to understand the neural mechanisms underlying behavior), and (3) computational modeling (which proposes formal and explicit specifications of information processing). The guiding principle of our approach is context dependence, within and (in contrast to Marr [1982]) between levels of organization. We propose that three (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations