Switch to: References

Add citations

You must login to add citations.
  1. Insular Activation During Reward Anticipation Reflects Duration of Illness in Abstinent Pathological Gamblers.Kosuke Tsurumi, Ryosaku Kawada, Naoto Yokoyama, Genichi Sugihara, Nobukatsu Sawamoto, Toshihiko Aso, Hidenao Fukuyama, Toshiya Murai & Hidehiko Takahashi - 2014 - Frontiers in Psychology 5.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Measuring Anhedonia: Impaired Ability to Pursue, Experience, and Learn About Reward.Kristine Rømer Thomsen - 2015 - Frontiers in Psychology 6.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • An Affective Neuroscience Framework for the Molecular Study of Internet Addiction.Christian Montag, Cornelia Sindermann, Benjamin Becker & Jaak Panksepp - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
  • General Deficit in Inhibitory Control of Excessive Smartphone Users: Evidence From an Event-Related Potential Study.Jingwei Chen, Yunsi Liang, Chunmiao Mai, Xiyun Zhong & Chen Qu - 2016 - Frontiers in Psychology 7.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  • Free Will, Black Swans and Addiction.Ted Fenton & Reinout W. Wiers - 2017 - Neuroethics 10 (1):157-165.
    The current dominant perspective on addiction as a brain disease has been challenged recently by Marc Lewis, who argued that the brain-changes related to addiction are similar to everyday changes of the brain. From this alternative perspective, addictions are bad habits that can be broken, provided that people are motivated to change. In that case, autonomous choice or “free will” can overcome bad influences from genes and or environments and brain-changes related to addiction. Even though we concur with Lewis that (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • ‘My Name is Joe and I'm an Alcoholic’: Addiction, Self-Knowledge and the Dangers of Rationalism.Neil Levy - 2016 - Mind and Language 31 (3):265-276.
    Rationalist accounts of self-knowledge are motivated in important part by the claim that only by looking to our reasons to discover our beliefs and desires are we active in relation to them and only thereby do we take responsibility for them. These kinds of account seem to predict that self-knowledge generated using third-personal methods or analogues of these methods will tend to undermine the capacity to exercise self-control. In this light, the insistence by treatment programs that addicts acknowledge that they (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  • The Paradox of Addiction Neuroscience.Peter B. Reiner - 2011 - Neuroethics 4 (2):65-77.
    Neuroscience has substantially advanced the understanding of how changes in brain biochemistry contribute to mechanisms of tolerance and physical dependence via exposure to addictive drugs. Many scientists and mental health advocates scaffold this emerging knowledge by adding the imprimatur of disease, arguing that conceptualizing addiction as a brain disease will reduce stigma amongst the folk. Promoting a brain disease concept is grounded in beneficent and utilitarian thinking: the language makes room for individuals living with addiction to receive the same level (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  • Addiction: An Emergent Consequence of Elementary Choice Principles.Gene M. Heyman - 2013 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 56 (5):428 - 445.
    ABSTRACT Clinicians, researchers and the informed public have come to view addiction as a brain disease. However, in nature even extreme events often reflect normal processes, for instance the principles of plate tectonics explain earthquakes as well as the gradual changes in the face of the earth. In the same way, excessive drug use is predicted by general principles of choice. One of the implications of this result is that drugs do not turn addicts into compulsive drug users; they retain (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  • Self-Evaluation of Decision-Making: A General Bayesian Framework for Metacognitive Computation.Stephen M. Fleming & Nathaniel D. Daw - 2017 - Psychological Review 124 (1):91-114.
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  • The Neuroethics of Pleasure and Addiction in Public Health Strategies Moving Beyond Harm Reduction: Funding the Creation of Non-Addictive Drugs and Taxonomies of Pleasure.Robin Mackenzie - 2011 - Neuroethics 4 (2):103-117.
    We are unlikely to stop seeking pleasure, as this would prejudice our health and well-being. Yet many psychoactive substances providing pleasure are outlawed as illicit recreational drugs, despite the fact that only some of them are addictive to some people. Efforts to redress their prohibition, or to reform legislation so that penalties are proportionate to harm have largely failed. Yet, if choices over seeking pleasure are ethical insofar as they avoid harm to oneself or others, public health strategies should foster (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  • Impaired Self-Awareness in Human Addiction: Deficient Attribution of Personal Relevance.Scott J. Moeller & Rita Z. Goldstein - 2014 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 18 (12):635-641.
  • Cognitive Neuroscience of Self-Regulation Failure.Todd F. Heatherton & Dylan D. Wagner - 2011 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 15 (3):132-139.
  • Addiction: Decreased Reward Sensitivity and Increased Expectation Sensitivity Conspire to Overwhelm the Brain's Control Circuit.Nora D. Volkow, Gene-Jack Wang, Joanna S. Fowler, Dardo Tomasi, Frank Telang & Ruben Baler - 2010 - Bioessays 32 (9):748-755.