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  1. Should Liberal-Egalitarians Support a Basic Income? An Examination of the Effectiveness and Stability of Ideal Welfare Regimes.Jürgen Sirsch - 2021 - Moral Philosophy and Politics 8 (2):209-233.
    The article deals with the question whether an unconditional basic income is part of an ideal liberal-egalitarian welfare regime. Analyzing UBI from an ideal-theoretical perspective requires a comparison of the justice performance of ideal welfare regimes instead of comparing isolated institutional designs. This holistic perspective allows for a more systematic consideration of issues like institutional complementarity. I compare three potential ideal welfare regimes from a liberal-egalitarian perspective of justice: An ideal social democratic regime, a mixed regime containing a moderate UBI (...)
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  • Green Republicanism and the Shift to Post-Productivism: A Defence of an Unconditional Basic Income.Jorge Pinto - 2020 - Res Publica 26 (2):257-274.
    Green republicanism can be described as a subset of republican political theory that aims at promoting human flourishing by ensuring a non-dominating and ecologically sustainable republic. An essential aspect of green republicanism is the promotion of post-productivism while preserving or expanding republican freedom as non-domination. Post-productivism implies the promotion of personal autonomy rather than the pursuit of permanent economic growth and the promotion of labour as an intrinsically positive human activity, which for green republicans will have three positive aspects: reduced (...)
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  • How Much Care is Enough? Carer’s Guilt and Bergsonian Time.Will Johncock - 2018 - Health Care Analysis 26 (1):94-107.
    Despite devoting their time to another person’s needs, many carers paradoxically experience guilt during their caregiving tenure concerning whether they are providing enough care. When discussing the “enough” of anything, what is at stake is that thing’s quantification. Given that there are seemingly no quantifiable units of care by which to measure the role, concerns regarding whether enough care is being provided often focus on what constitutes enough time as a carer. In exploring this aspect of the carer’s experience, two (...)
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  • Temporal Autonomy in a Laboring Society.Rutger Claassen - 2012 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 55 (5):543-562.
    Abstract The aim of this paper is to discuss which stance towards the allocation of labor and leisure would be defensible from the perspective of modern liberal political theory. There is a long tradition in philosophy defending an ideal of leisure, but this tradition has been rightly criticized for being too perfectionist. A liberal perspective seems more attractive in not dictating how much time people spend in labor or leisure, but leaving this choice to individuals. The question is whether this (...)
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  • Worth Your Time: Free Time by Julie Rose: Princeton University Press, 184 Pp, $35.00, ISBN: 9780691163451.Douglas Bamford - 2017 - Res Publica 23 (3):387-390.
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  • The Value of Time Matters for Temporal Justice.Jens Jørund Tyssedal - 2021 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 24 (1):183-196.
    There has recently been a revived interest in temporal justice among political philosophers. For example, lone mothers have, on average, 30 h less free time per week than people in couples without children. Recent work has focussed on free time as a distinct distributive good, but this paper argues that it would be a mistake for a theory of temporal justice to focus only on shares of free time. First, I argue that the concept of free time does not succeed (...)
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  • De-Gendering Social Justice in the 21st Century: An Immanent Critique of Neoliberal Capitalism.Albena Azmanova - 2012 - European Journal of Social Theory 15 (2):143-156.
    This article presents a blueprint of a feminist agenda for the twenty-first century that is oriented not by the telos of gender parity, but instead evolves as an ‘immanent critique’ of the key structural dynamics of contemporary capitalism – within a framework of analysis derived from the tenets of Critical Theory of Frankfurt School origin. This activates a form of critique whose double focus on shared conceptions of justice; and structural sources of injustice, allows criteria of social justice to emerge (...)
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  • Epistemic Network Injustice.Kai Spiekermann - 2019 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 19 (1):83-101.
    To find out what is in one’s own best interest, it is helpful to ask one’s epistemic peers. However, identifying one’s epistemic peers is not a trivial task. I consider a stylized political setting, an electoral competition of ‘Masses’ and ‘Elites’. To succeed, the Masses need to know which alternative on offer is truly in their interest. To find out, the Masses can pool their privately held information in a pre-election ballot, provided that they can reliably find out with whom (...)
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  • On the Value of Economic Growth.Julie L. Rose - 2019 - Politics, Philosophy and Economics 19 (2):128-153.
    Must a society aim indefinitely for continued economic growth? Proponents of economic growth advance three central challenges to the idea that a society, having attained high levels of income and wealth, may justly cease to pursue further economic growth: if environmentally sustainable and the gains fairly distributed, first, continued economic growth could make everyone within a society and globally, and especially the worst off, progressively better off; second, the pursuit of economic growth spurs ongoing innovation, which enhances people’s opportunities and (...)
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  • Is Time Money? Philosophical Perspectives on the Monetary Valuation of Travel Time.Maria Nordström - unknown
    This licentiate thesis consists of an introduction and three papers discussing various aspects of time as a commodity and the practice of valuing travel time. The first paper is an analysis of the properties of time as an economic resource taking into account literature on behavior with regard to time. The intent is to provide better understanding of the underlying assumption of transferability between time and money in the context of transportation. The second paper builds on the analysis in the (...)
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  • Environmentalism, Ecologism, and Basic Income.Jorge Pinto - 2020 - Basic Income Studies 15 (1).
    The Greens are the political group in which the support for the implementation of a basic income is stronger. Nevertheless, the reasons for that support are not always clear and quite often not related to environmental issues. For this reason, two different approaches to a green BI – environmental and ecological – are discussed in this article. The first could be part of a green growth strategy, whereas the second would require structural changes to the economic model, in support of (...)
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  • We Fight for Roses Too: Time-Use and Global Gender Justice.Alison M. Jaggar - 2013 - Journal of Global Ethics 9 (2):115 - 129.
    The World Development Report 2012: Gender Equality and Development has recently confirmed the widely held belief that women across the world tend to perform different work from men who otherwise are situated similarly. Women also work longer hours than similarly situated men. In analyzing the justice of these gendered disparities in time-use, WDR 2012 uses a moral framework that is largely distributive. Although this framework illuminates some aspects of the injustice of the situation, I contend that it obscures other crucial (...)
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  • Had We but World Enough, and Time: Integrating the Dimensions of Global Justice.Tim Hayward & Yukinori Iwaki - 2016 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 19 (4):383-399.
  • Money Does Not Guarantee Time: Discretionary Time as a Distinct Object of Distributive Justice.Julie L. Rose - 2014 - Journal of Political Philosophy 22 (4):438-457.