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  1. When do nudges undermine voluntary consent?Maximilian Kiener - 2021 - Philosophical Studies 178 (12):4201-4226.
    The permissibility of nudging in public policy is often assessed in terms of the conditions of transparency, rationality, and easy resistibility. This debate has produced important resources for any ethical inquiry into nudging, but it has also failed to focus sufficiently on a different yet very important question, namely: when do nudges undermine a patient’s voluntary consent to a medical procedure? In this paper, I take on this further question and, more precisely, I ask to which extent the three conditions (...)
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  • Public Health Nudges: Weighing Individual Liberty and Population Health Benefits.Derek Soled - 2021 - Journal of Medical Ethics 47 (11):756-760.
    Libertarian paternalism describes the idea of nudging —that is, steering individual decision-making while preserving freedom of choice. In medicine, libertarian paternalism has gained widespread attention, specifically with respect to interventions designed to promote healthy behaviours. Some scholars argue that nudges appropriately balance autonomy and paternalistic beneficence, while others argue that nudges inherently exploit cognitive weaknesses. This paper further explores the ethics of libertarian paternalism in public health. The use of nudges may infringe on an individual’s voluntary choice, autonomy and informed (...)
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  • Ethical Issues in the Use of Nudges to Obtain Informed Consent for Biomedical Research.Maxwell J. Mehlman, Eric Kodish & Jessica Berg - 2018 - IRB: Ethics & Human Research 40 (3):1-5.
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  • Talking the Talk: Enhancing Clinical Ethics with Health Literacy Best Practices.Jamie Watson - 2019 - HEC Forum 31 (3):177-199.
    A significant proportion of the U.S. population exhibits low health literacy. Evidence suggests that low health literacy is correlated with higher medical costs and poorer health outcomes. Even more concerning, evidence suggests that low health literacy threatens patients’ and families’ autonomy and exacerbates injustices in patients who are already vulnerable to difficulties navigating the health care system. There is also, however, increasing evidence that health literacy interventions—including initiatives such as plain language practices and teach-back—improve comprehension and usefulness of health care (...)
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  • The Patient Perspective in Health Care Networks.Kasper Raus, Eric Mortier & Kristof Eeckloo - 2018 - BMC Medical Ethics 19 (1):52.
    Health care organization is entering a new age. Focus is increasingly shifting from individual health care institutions to interorganizational collaboration and health care networks. Much hope is set on such networks which have been argued to improve economic efficiency and quality of care. However, this does not automatically mean they are always ethically justified. A relevant question that remains is what ethical obligations or duties one can ascribe to these networks especially because networks involve many risks. Due to their often (...)
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  • Authenticity, Best Interest, and Clinical Nudging.Søren Holm - 2017 - Hastings Center Report 47 (2):38-40.
    In this issue of the Hastings Center Report, Moti Gorin, Steven Joffe, Neal Dickert, and Scott Halpern offer a comprehensive defense of the use of nudging techniques in the clinical context, with the aim of promoting the best interests of patients. Their argument is built on three important claims: Nudging is ubiquitous and inescapable in clinical choice situations, and there is no neutral way of informing patients about their treatment choices; many patients do not have authentic preferences concerning their treatment (...)
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