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Societal dimensions of nanotechnology as a trading zone: results from a pilot project

In Baird D. (ed.), Discovering the Nanoscale. Ios. pp. 63--77 (2004)

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  1. The EPSRC’s Policy of Responsible Innovation From a Trading Zones Perspective.Joseph Murphy, Sarah Parry & John Walls - 2016 - Minerva 54 (2):151-174.
    Responsible innovation is gathering momentum as an academic and policy debate linking science and society. Advocates of RI in research policy argue that scientific research should be opened up at an early stage so that many actors and issues can steer innovation trajectories. If this is done, they suggest, new technologies will be more responsible in different ways, better aligned with what society wants, and mistakes of the past will be avoided. This paper analyses the dynamics of RI in policy (...)
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  • What Happens in the Lab: Applying Midstream Modulation to Enhance Critical Reflection in the Laboratory. [REVIEW]Daan Schuurbiers - 2011 - Science and Engineering Ethics 17 (4):769-788.
    In response to widespread policy prescriptions for responsible innovation, social scientists and engineering ethicists, among others, have sought to engage natural scientists and engineers at the ‘midstream’: building interdisciplinary collaborations to integrate social and ethical considerations with research and development processes. Two ‘laboratory engagement studies’ have explored how applying the framework of midstream modulation could enhance the reflections of natural scientists on the socio-ethical context of their work. The results of these interdisciplinary collaborations confirm the utility of midstream modulation in (...)
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  • Multidisciplinary Engagement with Nanoethics Through Education—The Nanobio-RAISE Advanced Courses as a Case Study and Model.Daan Schuurbiers, Susanne Sleenhoff, Johannes F. Jacobs & Patricia Osseweijer - 2009 - NanoEthics 3 (3):197-211.
    This paper presents and evaluates two advanced courses organised in Oxford as part of the European project Nanobio-RAISE and suggests using their format to encourage multidisciplinary engagement between nanoscientists and nanoethicists. Several nanoethicists have recently identified the need for ‘better’ ethics of emerging technologies, arguing that ethical reflection should become part and parcel of the research and development (R&D) process itself. Such new forms of ethical deliberation, it is argued, transcend traditional disciplinary boundaries and require the active engagement and involvement (...)
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  • Bibliography of Studies on Nanoscience and Nanotechnology.Joachim Schummer - 2004 - In Baird D. (ed.), Discovering the Nanoscale. Ios. pp. 311--316.
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  • Expertise in Interdisciplinary Science and EDucation.Mads Goddiksen & Hanne Andersen - unknown
    Many degree programs in science and engineering aim at enabling their students to perform interdisciplinary problem solving. In this paper we present three types of expertise that are involved in different ways in interdisciplinary problem solving. In doing so we shall first characterise two important epistemological challenges commonly faced in interdisciplinary problem solving, namely the communication challenge that arises from the use of different concepts within different scientific domains, and the integration challenge that arises from the differences between domain-specific epistemological (...)
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  • Moral Imagination, Trading Zones, and the Role of the Ethicist in Nanotechnology.Michael E. Gorman, Patricia H. Werhane & Nathan Swami - 2009 - NanoEthics 3 (3):185-195.
    The societal and ethical impacts of emerging technological and business systems cannot entirely be foreseen; therefore, management of these innovations will require at least some ethicists to work closely with researchers. This is particularly critical in the development of new systems because the maximum degrees of freedom for changing technological direction occurs at or just after the point of breakthrough; that is also the point where the long-term implications are hardest to visualize. Recent work on shared expertise in Science & (...)
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  • Moral Imagination, Trading Zones, and the Role of the Ethicist in Nanotechnology.E. Gorman Michael, H. Werhane Patricia & Nathan Swami - 2009 - NanoEthics 3 (3):185-195.
    The societal and ethical impacts of emerging technological and business systems cannot entirely be foreseen; therefore, management of these innovations will require at least some ethicists to work closely with researchers. This is particularly critical in the development of new systems because the maximum degrees of freedom for changing technological direction occurs at or just after the point of breakthrough; that is also the point where the long-term implications are hardest to visualize. Recent work on shared expertise in Science & (...)
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  • The Role of the Humanities and Social Sciences in Nanotechnology Research and Development.Mette Ebbesen - 2008 - NanoEthics 2 (1):1-13.
    The experience with genetically modified foods has been prominent in motivating science, industry and regulatory bodies to address the social and ethical dimensions of nanotechnology. The overall objective is to gain the general public’s acceptance of nanotechnology in order not to provoke a consumer boycott as it happened with genetically modified foods. It is stated implicitly in reports on nanotechnology research and development that this acceptance depends on the public’s confidence in the technology and that the confidence is created on (...)
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  • Ethics and Technology 'in the Making': An Essay on the Challenge of Nanoethics. [REVIEW]Deborah G. Johnson - 2007 - NanoEthics 1 (1):21-30.
    After reviewing portions of the 21st Century Nanotechnology Research and Development Act that call for examination of societal and ethical issues, this essay seeks to understand how nanoethics can play a role in nanotechnology development. What can and should nanoethics aim to achieve? The focus of the essay is on the challenges of examining ethical issues with regard to a technology that is still emerging, still ‘in the making.’ The literature of science and technology studies (STS) is used to understand (...)
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  • Responsible Development of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology: Contextualizing Socio-Technical Integration Into the Nanofabrication Laboratories in the USA. [REVIEW]Debasmita Patra - 2011 - NanoEthics 5 (2):143-157.
    There have been several conscious efforts made by different stakeholders in the area of nanoscience and nanotechnology to increase the awareness of social and ethical issues (SEI) among its practitioners. But so far, little has been done at the laboratory level to integrate a SEI component into the laboratory orientation schedule of practitioners. Since the laboratory serves as the locus of activities of the scientific community, it is important to introduce SEI there to stimulate thinking and discussion of SEI among (...)
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  • Clarifying Interactional and Contributory Expertise.Mads Goddiksen - 2014 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 47:111-117.
  • Social and Ethical Interactions with Nano: Mapping the Early Literature. [REVIEW]Kamilla Kjølberg & Fern Wickson - 2007 - NanoEthics 1 (2):89-104.
    There is a rapidly expanding field of research on social and ethical interactions with nano-scaled sciences and technologies. An important question is: What does social and ethical research actually mean when it is focussed on technological applications that are largely hypothetical, and a field of science spread out across multiple disciplines and lacking unification? This paper maps early literature in the field of research as a way of answering this question. Our aim is to describe how this field is developing (...)
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  • The Role of the Humanities and Social Sciences in Nanotechnology Research and Development.Mette Ebbesen - 2008 - NanoEthics 2 (3):333-333.
    The experience with genetically modified foods has been prominent in motivating science, industry and regulatory bodies to address the social and ethical dimensions of nanotechnology. The overall objective is to gain the general public’s acceptance of nanotechnology in order not to provoke a consumer boycott as it happened with genetically modified foods. It is stated implicitly in reports on nanotechnology research and development that this acceptance depends on the public’s confidence in the technology and that the confidence is created on (...)
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  • Integrating and Enacting 'Social and Ethical Issues' in Nanotechnology Practices.Ana Viseu & Heather Maguire - 2012 - NanoEthics 6 (3):195-209.
    The integration of nanotechnology’s ‘social and ethical issues’ (SEI) at the research and development stage is one of the defining features of nanotechnology governance in the United States. Mandated by law, integration extends the field of nanotechnology to include a role for the “social”, the “public” and the social sciences and humanities in research and development (R&D) practices and agendas. Drawing from interviews with scientists, engineers and policymakers who took part in an oral history of the “Future of Nanotechnology” symposium (...)
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